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Old 05-13-2009, 08:47 AM   #21
Jon Brody
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Interesting you mention the "visualization", which I def think it can reap huge benefits for performance in sports. But ya, when I gave it a 2nd thought, I personally can't even truly visualize -- at least not well and with searing focus -- if I'm all hopped up, antsy, and trying to (artificially?) boost my adrenaline first and foremost.
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Old 05-15-2009, 02:23 PM   #22
Rafe Kelley
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Thanks for the reply Gant, I went back and tried to lift calm all this week too decent effect hit a 5 rep set of 155 on the squat which is just 2kg of my max. I am aware of the ADHD hyper focus its wonderfull feeling one I chase but its not something I can access automatically the best way for me to get into it is honestly to have someone through a punch at me, it why I enjoyed working as bouncer cause every time there was confrontation I got to hit that state.

For me I don't have so much life distractions I don't think about stuff going on but its like I am trying to vizualize trying to focus to almost slow down time and sometimes the focus just doesn't come. Its like trying to focus on digital camera were it almost comes in focus but then get hazy and you can't seem to find the way to make it stay in that clear focus. Still going to work on it my recovery is enough of an issue that the potential benefits of lifting calm are compelling.
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Old 05-19-2009, 09:44 AM   #23
Reed Winn
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In the Weightlifting Encyclopedia the author says basically the same thing Pendlay said on page 1, ie that people that have less arousal when they lift intensely can go heavy more often. In the WL book he talks a lot about "nervous energy", how it needs to be controlled by mental training and used sparingly.

It's interesting to see another aspect of the "mind-body connection" at work.

A fellow on the first page said various mental practices lead to a 2-3 fold increase in recovery ability. I don't doubt it helped recovery but surely if it doubled or tripled recovery ability that would mean he could apply 2-3 times the stress per workout and progress 2-3 times faster. This seems quite unlikely.

Personally I try to do sets of a 5x5 with "calm confidence" talking myself through it but not getting worked up. When I do speed doubles I try to work myself up for each set to do them faster. When I do the classical movements I try to be calm and just think a few works as self-cues.
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Old 05-19-2009, 09:57 AM   #24
Gant Grimes
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Rafe, I know exactly what you are talking about. The hyperfocus related to ADHD is different than the one you're describing when someone throws a punch. They are both stress induced, but the first is a mental response, and the second is hormonal (adrenaline, time dilation, etc.).
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Old 05-19-2009, 12:33 PM   #25
Rafe Kelley
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Didn't realize their was difference. A more mundane example of hyperfocus for me ADHD related or not that I still couldn't control was in school. I pretty much was unable to force myself to study unless I hit a state of panic when I started university I would usually panic 3-4 days before Paper or test was due. I did pretty well academically this way I quit school when I was unable to panic anymore.

As far as I understand it hyperfocus is not voluntary at all for ADHD individuals, in fact rather the opposite studies have shown that ADHD brains become increasingly less able to focus the more effort the put into trying to focus. Studying for math exam focusing is ridiculously hard when there an emergency at the gym broken wrist, dislocated shoulder then it comes easy.
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