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Old 05-30-2009, 11:05 AM   #1
Matthieu Hertilus
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Default Is overtraining a myth?

I may get some heat for even raising such a question, but I read more and more interviews and beliefs from strength coaches and personal trainers that the term overtraining is used way too often and that it's more so a matter of not revoering enough. I know athletes work for years to be able to tolerate multiple sessions a day and long training hours a week, but they also eat right, sleep well, and use a bunch of revovery methods to make sure their mind and body are good to go. Just wanted to raise the topic and see what everyone thinks on the subject.
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Old 05-30-2009, 12:15 PM   #2
Patrick Donnelly
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Try this program, then tell me that you can never push yourself too far.
http://www.tmuscle.com/readArticle.do?id=1605986&cr

The average human being can not go without a day job, or live a stress-free life, or get 9 hours of sleep each night, or get daily massages, etc. All of those things would help deter overtraining, but you could still get it. It'd just require you to push harder. Much harder.

Steven Low can probably give a good explanation between the differences of "overtraining" and simply "overreaching." The first term is probably used too often where the second should be, but that doesn't mean it doesn't exist.

(No pressure, Steve. Hahah.)
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Old 05-30-2009, 04:23 PM   #3
Michael Hartman
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Good question for discussion. Overtraining is not a myth, but it is misunderstood and grossly overstated by most people. Fatigue is a normal response to training. For full blown overtraining to occur that fatigue would have to accumulate over a period of weeks and months. Most normal people will take a few days off, or an overuse injury limits their training, before OT develops. Competitive athletes are more susceptible because of the demands of competition, desire to win, etc., but mostly the inability to take time off due to their sport.
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Old 05-30-2009, 07:20 PM   #4
Garrett Smith
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Hartman View Post
Competitive athletes are more susceptible because of the demands of competition, desire to win, etc., but mostly the inability to take time off due to their sport.
Please provide an example of someone who is "unable" to take time off due to their sport?

My impression is more of "unwilling" or "too thickheaded..."
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Old 05-30-2009, 07:37 PM   #5
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Quote:
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Please provide an example of someone who is "unable" to take time off due to their sport?
"
anyone who wears a TAPOUT shirt. Once you don the golden fleece you need to back that shit up. TCB-24/7, Bro.
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Old 05-30-2009, 08:34 PM   #6
Michael Hartman
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Quote:
Please provide an example of someone who is "unable" to take time off due to their sport?

My impression is more of "unwilling" or "too thickheaded..."
I was coming from the perspective that a recreational athlete has the ability to skip a few workouts, or postpone their next comp. Whereas the competitive athlete "has" to train (for lack of a better term), which may eventually lead to overtraining. However, I agree, a certain amount of unwillingness to rest is usually the cause but there are different examples of athletes, either through their own doing or a misguided coach, who do not have extended breaks in training.

Team sport athletes at the HS level; where one might go from different sports in different seasons, or varsity and club teams, with pressure from different coaches and teams to practice/compete.

The collegiate distance runner who has to run XC, Indoor, and Outdoor to keep their 1/4 scholarship + books.

The post-collegiate athlete who gave up his day job to move to the OTC to train for the next Olympics, which also means placing at Nationals in May, Team Trials in August, Worlds in November, and a host of other competitions throughout the year to keep their spot and monthly stipend.
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Old 05-31-2009, 06:56 AM   #7
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I had one summer before high school where I had five sports going at once:
Swim team
Pony baseball
Seniors baseball
Two basketball teams

I was talented enough that coaches were okay with me missing many practices and mainly showing up for games/meets. This meant I was nearly always running at full tilt (did I mention I was a catcher, playing every inning for both teams?) Towards the end of the summer, I got extremely fatigued, sleeping 12-14 hours every day (got the full workups for mono and valley fever nothing came back positive), a mid-back pain that I still have to this day, and I basically had to quit all the sports at once. If there was ever overtraining, I was in it.

Take proper rest or the body will make you take proper rest. Ignore it further and bad things happen.
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Old 05-31-2009, 07:27 AM   #8
Matthieu Hertilus
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I'm beginning to think it's more a matter of CNS overload rather than muscle fatigue. Especially for anyone who does olympic weightlifting or powerlifting type training regularly. I've had lots of trouble sleeping for more than 6 hours straight and it's probably due to all the o'lifts I do. But if overtraining is more so related to CNS fatigue, is rest the only means of recovery in that sense?
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Old 05-31-2009, 09:54 AM   #9
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Training at night often screws up sleep, you might look there first if that's something you do and you have trouble sleeping.
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Old 05-31-2009, 11:02 AM   #10
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I've been guilty of not distinguishing between overreaching and overtraining - mainly because I didn't realize there WAS a distinction, until I actually looked it up.

I've definitely overreached, but a week off and I'm back in the game. I've not come close to actually overtraining...I'm not sure I ever could, as I'd most likely injure myself before it came to that.
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