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Old 09-25-2009, 01:33 PM   #21
Donald Lee
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I haven't been doing any German hangs. I am not purposely internally rotating in any exercise; I'm just doing the stretch.

I was doing the back lever with palms down, but since switching to palms up, the back lever has felt much better.

I think the issue may be more of a shoulder extension (shoulder articulated down and back like German hang) ROM issue than an internal rotation issue. Maybe it was both though. I'd like to someday do Bulgarian dips, so I might as well work on both shoulder extension and internal rotation.

I'll probably have a lot more time to stretch my upper body now that I've reinjured my lower body. I guess it's a blessing in disguise, since the last time I injured it, I started doing more gymnastics exercises for the upper body.

Thanks for the suggestions, Dr. G. I'll have to be more conscious of my shoulder rotation during exercises.
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Old 09-25-2009, 04:26 PM   #22
Steven Low
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Quote:
I was doing the back lever with palms down, but since switching to palms up, the back lever has felt much better.
Correct technique is palms down, so there's clearly something wrong if you can't do that without it hurting.

Where's the pain located at specifically?

I think you might have some biceps long head tendonitis.
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Old 09-25-2009, 04:31 PM   #23
Donald Lee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Low View Post
Correct technique is palms down, so there's clearly something wrong if you can't do that without it hurting.

Where's the pain located at specifically?

I think you might have some biceps long head tendonitis.
Isn't correct technique with the chinup grip? I think we're saying the same thing. And, I didn't have any pain doing it the other way, but it did start to click better when I switched.
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Old 09-26-2009, 05:32 AM   #24
Blair Lowe
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Donald, it is easier that way. That's why it clicked better. Which is why we are supposed to train it the hard way. This prepares the elbow for the Iron Cross while the other does not.
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Old 09-26-2009, 06:54 PM   #25
Donald Lee
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So I'm supposed to do it with the pullup grip?
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Old 09-01-2010, 04:51 AM   #26
luis sarabia
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Hello Donald! Hope you are feeling better.
My name's Luis Ernesto Sarabia and I'm an ex-gymnast, professional acrobat and Personal Trainer. I'm very familiar with does symptoms you are showing...got it myself for years...forearms, elbows, shoulder. In my opinion and if you don't mind me saying...you are overdoing it a bit!
I find this article very interesting, so I forward it to you.

Hope this help and you get well soon.


Definition of Tendinitis
Tendinitis (also known as tendinitis) is an inflammation of a tendon (a band of fibrous tissue connecting muscle to bone) that causes pain, tenderness and occasionally, restricted movement of the muscle attached to the affected tendon.
Shoulder Tendinitis

There are three (3) types of shoulder tendinitis - rotator cuff tendinitis, calcified tendinitis and biceps tendinitis.

The rotator cuff consists of four muscles around the shoulder joint that help control the shoulder's position and keep it stable. With rotator cuff tendinitis the pain is located about three inches below the top of the shoulder and is felt when reaching overhead or behind the back. Rotator cuff tendinitis will usually resolve with rest, anti-inflammatory medications or an injection of cortisone and a local anesthetic into the area surrounding the tendon, as well as exercising using light weights.
Continue ...


All the best.
Luis Sarabia
http://www.planchetraining.blogspot.com
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