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Old 03-18-2010, 08:04 PM   #21
Donald Lee
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Originally Posted by Anton Emery View Post
Does anyone know if Joel suggests 3x additional S&C workouts along with combat sport practice, or should one mix some of these modalities in with your sporting practice? I probably need to go back and look at the book.


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He writes that your MMA training and S&C should be integrated, as in they should be complementary. If you have a tough workout day, then your MMA training that day should be light. As you get closer to a fight, you can use your MMA training as your S&C. I'm not sure if what I wrote is very clear, so if you don't understand what I wrote, let me know.
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Old 03-18-2010, 08:10 PM   #22
Joe Hart
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So to add to Donald's post.

Joel recommends using MMA technique drills and training (one example sparring) to do your conditioning. So if you can keep your HR in the CO range doing shadow boxing do that. See where take down drills would work. Many of Joel regimines are just HR and time based so if you can keep it there doing MMA stuff all the better. Hopefully I didn't say what Donald said and or made it worse.
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Old 03-19-2010, 12:01 AM   #23
Anton Emery
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Got it, thanks guys. So basically if i can incorporate one of my aerobic sessions in my Jits practice then i should do that. Sounds good.



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Old 03-19-2010, 08:40 AM   #24
Gant Grimes
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A simpler method I now use to stay in the aerobic range is the Maffetone formula.
180 - your age, (for me 142 HR). Don't go above that HR.
If you're doing HR-based training, you really need to find your MHR. I used MHR=(220-age) for awhile until I decided to actually test it out one day. It was off by about 14 BPM, which really skewed my training.
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Old 03-19-2010, 09:23 AM   #25
Ryan Hagenbuch
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If you're doing HR-based training, you really need to find your MHR. I used MHR=(220-age) for awhile until I decided to actually test it out one day. It was off by about 14 BPM, which really skewed my training.
I'm not interested in that. As I said, I have no desire to become an endurance athlete, just doing the minimum to derive the benefits from this training without effecting my strength training.

If you read my article, you would see I have my master's in ex. phys specializing in cardiopulmonary disease. I am quite aware that the formulas used are just estimates used as guidelines, but for my purposes they will suffice. I have no desire in finding my lactate threshold, VO2 max or any of that other crap (I did those tests at my old job).

I can tell from my body if I am pushing my pace too far/fast and getting into the anaerobic zones. I don't stick to that HR exclusively and if you read up on Maffetone, you would see that the formula changes based on individual situations (training history, etc.).
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