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Old 02-10-2010, 11:23 AM   #11
Mike ODonnell
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Originally Posted by Darryl Shaw View Post
Interesting......

Anyone have any thoughts on using trap bar DL's as a safe alternative to squats for someone with arthritic knees?
Can't see why not, as technically it's more like a squat holding heavy DBs...that are connected...and bar shaped.

Supporting the knee with strong and balanced (ratio wise) quads/hams is very important.

May help people get more posterior chain activation too by going lower and having better form than with a bar squat. Plus many of my clients who I used it on just felt more relaxed and safer doing it that way (knowing they could drop it at any time), so performance probably was increased due to that mental factor.

Using a step/box with it also is good for getting full ROM.
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Old 02-10-2010, 01:12 PM   #12
Derek Weaver
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I was actually thinking of this thread and realized that the trap bar deadlift is a) good as an intermediate lift between an actual pull and squat. b) a good step up exercise for those lacking the flexibility/mobility to do a fully squat (I'm thinking obviously hips, and ankles, but also thoracic extension and mobility of the shoulders) while working on the necessary attributes to actually squat

Someone with arthritic knees would likely do well. A good way to load the body, range of motion will be okay-but not great. I don't see why not. Like a non retarded leg press.
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Old 02-10-2010, 03:14 PM   #13
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Can be somewhat harder to keep the knees in a correct track than with regular squats IMO.

Conventional DL is the knee-friendly version of the squat if you ask me.
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Old 02-13-2010, 05:51 AM   #14
Darryl Shaw
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Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
Can't see why not, as technically it's more like a squat holding heavy DBs...that are connected...and bar shaped.

Supporting the knee with strong and balanced (ratio wise) quads/hams is very important.

May help people get more posterior chain activation too by going lower and having better form than with a bar squat. Plus many of my clients who I used it on just felt more relaxed and safer doing it that way (knowing they could drop it at any time), so performance probably was increased due to that mental factor.

Using a step/box with it also is good for getting full ROM.
So it's kinda like doing DB squats using a bar type contraption...... seems kind of obvious when it's put like that. lol.

Good point on the psychological aspect of feeling confidant to push your limits without fear of failure. There have been a few occasions over the past couple of years where my knees have simply given way on me during heavy squats so I'm becoming increasingly reluctant to test my limits on this exercise. Trap bar DL's sound like a good way to get round that problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Weaver View Post
I was actually thinking of this thread and realized that the trap bar deadlift is a) good as an intermediate lift between an actual pull and squat. b) a good step up exercise for those lacking the flexibility/mobility to do a fully squat (I'm thinking obviously hips, and ankles, but also thoracic extension and mobility of the shoulders) while working on the necessary attributes to actually squat

Someone with arthritic knees would likely do well. A good way to load the body, range of motion will be okay-but not great. I don't see why not. Like a non retarded leg press.
Again some good points. I like squats but my knees don't. I don't want to stop squatting so an exercise that permits me to perform a squat like exercise but with heavier loads than my knees can handle in a full squat would, I think, be extremely beneficial.

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Originally Posted by Brandon Oto View Post
Can be somewhat harder to keep the knees in a correct track than with regular squats IMO.

Conventional DL is the knee-friendly version of the squat if you ask me.
I understand what you're saying but I can already do convnentional DL's to my hearts content. What's missing from my workouts are genuinely heavy squats. If trap bar DL's can provide my with a means of getting back into heavy squatting (sort of) with less pain due to the slightly reduced ROM and less risk of injury from a failed rep then I'd be a fool not to give them a try.

So it looks like I know what I'll be getting for my next birthday.
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Old 02-13-2010, 06:18 AM   #15
Brandon Oto
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Try wide box squats as well.
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Old 02-13-2010, 11:06 AM   #16
Derek Weaver
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Wide box squats can be interesting if additional flexibility needs to be developed. Start slow if need be.
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Old 03-03-2010, 01:55 PM   #17
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I just saw this while I was looking through a couple other things and it made me think of this thread:
Quote:
I usually start my high school athletes with the trap bar deadlift. The trap bar is a great piece of equipment that I feel should be used more often by strength coaches. It evenly distributes the weight through the midline of the athlete’s body as opposed to in front of it like regular straight bar deads. This is a great way to strengthen a young athlete’s low back, while placing much less stress on the spine. By no means is the trap bar just for beginners, though. I use it with my college and professional athletes as well.
Here's the full article if anyone's interested.

It was posted a while ago on t-mag I think.
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Old 03-03-2010, 02:06 PM   #18
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funny because I use the trap bar for my HS athletes as well, along with box squats... much safer on their backs and gets results.
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Old 04-06-2010, 02:58 PM   #19
Joe Hart
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After reading this post I started kicking around the idea of getting a trap bar. So, those of you that have used one, do you remember what brands they were? I noticed that there is a trap bar in the store (PMenu) and it is reasonably priced. I found the PDA bars and they are on the high end, but they seem like really nice bars and then you can go to Amazon and get ones for much less (some got bad reviews). Or I could just stick with normal DLs.
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