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Old 07-02-2010, 06:21 PM   #11
Derek Weaver
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Originally Posted by Kevin Perry View Post
Stick to what your doing.

What exactly are you eating? If you have developed a gut, just cut carbs and up fat and protein.


Weight loss and getting stronger: Hard goals that slightly conflict with each other, any type of fat loss diet means your going to lose some muscle and with it some strength. Just the reality of that.
It's not that simple. Upping fat and protein would or at least still could compromise the required energy deficit.

The energy balance equation still holds true. Smaller deficits = smaller amounts of weight and fat loss with greater retention of LBM, bigger deficits usually equal the opposite, unless it's something well done like Lyle's Rapid Fat Loss.
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Old 07-05-2010, 12:49 PM   #12
Kevin Shaughnessy
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Originally Posted by Dave Van Skike View Post
Everyone wants to be
1)Lean,
2)Strong
3)do it quickly.

Basic rule is you can get two out of those three.

if the goal is to be strong right away, you must accept chubbage. If what you really want is to look lean and be getting strong, accept a longer timeline.

Personally I suggest you set a much higher goal. sub 200 pounds with a 1100# crossfit total. NFW do you need to be 220 to squat or pull that weight.

Tell me again what you really really want...identify the top priority and the path is easy to see.
I'd like to look lean and be getting stronger. My goals arent lofty and I'm in this for the long haul. I'll likely set higher goals later, but right now I'm just focusing on whats achievable in the near future.
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Old 07-05-2010, 01:15 PM   #13
Dave Van Skike
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Originally Posted by Kevin Shaughnessy View Post
I'd like to look lean and be getting stronger. My goals arent lofty and I'm in this for the long haul. I'll likely set higher goals later, but right now I'm just focusing on whats achievable in the near future.
then you're over-thinking it. do what it takes to be lean: eat less, up the cardio and keep pecking away at the strength goals for the long haul.

consider dropping the number of reps and keep the lifting frequency high. this is totally do-able. 5 sets of 5 may not be the ticket for you, I've found that too difficult to recover form when in a caloric deficit. but higher frequency low fatigue lifting (nowhere close to failure) has worked well for me in this situation.
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Old 07-22-2010, 04:33 PM   #14
Kevin Shaughnessy
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I have a question: I`m on a linear type program, crossfit wichita falls. I stalled and have ramped back up and am nearing PR territory again. I dont expect to get much further if anywhere further, but would like to maintain my strength. What do I do when I stall again? I think repeating the same weight over and over again will just lead to faster burn out on a calorie deficient diet.

Any thoughts are appreciated, thanks.
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Old 07-22-2010, 05:47 PM   #15
Derek Weaver
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Keep the intensity high, volume low and recognize you won't make anymore PR's until you're done leaning out.

If all you want to do is maintain strength, then do exactly what Dave said.

The number one factor in keeping strength and muscle when dieting is intensity, understood as weight on the bar. 1-2 sets heavy sets, back off sets as you need/like, I think is what Lyle has recommended. I'm too lazy to look, but I'm pretty sure he's got an article on the site with this recommendation and explanation.
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Old 07-29-2010, 11:51 AM   #16
Justin Lascek
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Originally Posted by Kevin

;78604
I have a question: I`m on a linear type program, crossfit wichita falls. I stalled and have ramped back up and am nearing PR territory again. I dont expect to get much further if anywhere further, but would like to maintain my strength. What do I do when I stall again? I think repeating the same weight over and over again will just lead to faster burn out on a calorie deficient diet.

Any thoughts are appreciated, thanks.
Couple things.

Your original post said that Texas Method wouldn't have an issue with recovery. If you've used TM to its potential, recovery is a huge issue. I don't know where this info is coming from, but I doubt a lot of people have run a proper TM.

Secondly, how tall are you and how much do you weigh? Metrics like that are necessary if you want people to help you.

Lastly, if your emphasis is strength, I think there are better programs that you could use that have additional conditioning work. The program guidelines that you're following aren't bad (I know, because I wrote it), but it isn't optimal.

You could stick with your current S&C and manipulate volume and intensity like an intermediate would (volume based day and then intensity based day), but you have to think about all these variables holistically.

You could run a TM type program with added conditioning.

But I mean, how big is your gut to warrant all this hysteria?
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Old 07-29-2010, 02:25 PM   #17
Kevin Shaughnessy
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Couple things.

Your original post said that Texas Method wouldn't have an issue with recovery. If you've used TM to its potential, recovery is a huge issue. I don't know where this info is coming from, but I doubt a lot of people have run a proper TM.

Secondly, how tall are you and how much do you weigh? Metrics like that are necessary if you want people to help you.

Lastly, if your emphasis is strength, I think there are better programs that you could use that have additional conditioning work. The program guidelines that you're following aren't bad (I know, because I wrote it), but it isn't optimal.

You could stick with your current S&C and manipulate volume and intensity like an intermediate would (volume based day and then intensity based day), but you have to think about all these variables holistically.

You could run a TM type program with added conditioning.

But I mean, how big is your gut to warrant all this hysteria?
Its very possible I'm wrong about TM because I've never run it. All I've done so far is SS and CFWF. I guess I figured that TM is what you switch to when recovery becomes an issue on SS so its not as hard to recover from in general.

I'm making progress linearly on CFWF, so intermediate programming probably isn't warranted though.

I'm 6'2 and weigh 208 now, down from 216. Not humongous, but I can grab big handfulls of gut and that doesn't jive well with me.
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