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Old 08-13-2010, 05:56 AM   #11
Darryl Shaw
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In my opinion the recommendation that weightlifters eat 1-1.5gPRO/lb/d, which is 2.2x more protein than required, comes from the supplements industry who rely on people used to thinking in pounds not calculating their protein requirements correctly to sell product.

An athlete weighing a convenient 100kg (220 lbs) for example would have a protein intake of 100-140g/d, which is an amount that can easily be obtained by diet alone, if they based their intake on the correct 1-1.4g/kg/d. That same athlete eating 1-1.5g/lb/d would have a protein intake of 220-330g/d which would be impractical to obtain through diet alone unless they were willing to eat a whole chicken or two per day. Supplements therefore become the only practical way for that athlete to achieve a protein intake of 1-1.5g/lb/d on a daily basis so the supplements industry clearly benefits from people getting mixed up over whether protein intakes should be based on g/lb or g/kg.

Finally, I'm well aware of anecdotal evidence from weightlifters and bodybuilders who claim that eating large amounts of protein and using supplements lead to increased strength and size but protein in excess of 1.8-2g/kg/d is oxidized to provide energy so all those protein supplements are doing really is providing the extra calories required for growth.
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Old 08-13-2010, 06:56 AM   #12
John Alston
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Depending on the meat you can get 90-130g of protein per pound. If a 100kg/220lb lifter can't eat +2 pounds of meat (upto ~260g) during times of hard training then they aren't trying. Even I can do that and I'm sub 85kg.
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Old 08-13-2010, 12:19 PM   #13
Steve Shafley
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Pilon massages a lot of shit around to get his lowball number.
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Old 08-14-2010, 04:55 AM   #14
Darryl Shaw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Alston View Post
Depending on the meat you can get 90-130g of protein per pound. If a 100kg/220lb lifter can't eat +2 pounds of meat (upto ~260g) during times of hard training then they aren't trying. Even I can do that and I'm sub 85kg.
Okay, I concede that you can get 1-1.5gPRO/lb/d from your diet alone if you're prepared to eat 2+ lbs of meat per day but that's still far more protein than you actually need.
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Old 08-14-2010, 10:35 AM   #15
Kevin Perry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Alston View Post
Depending on the meat you can get 90-130g of protein per pound. If a 100kg/220lb lifter can't eat +2 pounds of meat (upto ~260g) during times of hard training then they aren't trying. Even I can do that and I'm sub 85kg.
stupid comment removed.
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Old 08-14-2010, 06:46 PM   #16
Geoffrey Thompson
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What? 1lb of meat is easy.
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Old 08-14-2010, 07:11 PM   #17
Kevin Perry
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What? 1lb of meat is easy.
stupid comment removed again.
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Old 08-14-2010, 09:54 PM   #18
Derek Weaver
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Yea if your metabolism is geared for it. Otherwise, the majority of people will find eating 2 lbs awfully difficult. You ever try eating one of those 26 oz steaks to try and get it for free at the local grill?...
I don't get this statement. What does metabolism have to do with it? Additonally, eating 2 lbs. at one sitting to try and get a steak for free is different than over an 8 hour window if you're IF'ing, or a 12-16 hour window if you're not.

Eating 2 lbs of meat in a day, if you can afford it, is not hard. The hardest part is cooking it and taking the food with you if you're busy.

To the OP:
My personal opinion on the whole whey protein thing basically comes down to this.

If you're not getting enough food down, shakes are fine. I'm going to disagree with Gant a little here and note that if someone needs a lot of protein to get things rolling, my opinion is they're likely not getting enough food to begin with.

Carbs and fat are protein sparing, meaning if you're in a surplus and eating enough of both, you shouldn't need a huge hit of protein. You will likely need less than if leaning out. As calories go up, protein needs begin to drop. Calories drop, protein requirements go up. If your BMR works out to 2500 calories/day and you're eating 3500 calories per day, the scale will move and you'll get plenty of protein assuming you actually eat dead animal flesh.

Whey is fine, a casein/whey mix, like I think Donald noted is better in most cases. If it doesn't make you break out, milk is likely the best.
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Old 08-14-2010, 11:26 PM   #19
Kevin Perry
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it was a sarcastic statement.

but really, I can barely stomach a pound of meat I can't imagine most normal people being able to handle that much either.
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Old 08-15-2010, 04:26 PM   #20
Blair Lowe
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2lbs of meat per day of hard training?

Now your being delusional, even an average joe is going to have a difficult time putting down 1 lbs of meat.
32oz of meat? I can inhale 1/2 to 3/4lb of lunch meat in one sitting and I'm possibly under 170 now.

Drink 1/2 gallon of milk a day (which is easy with 4 glasses of 16oz milk-1 in the morn and before bed and 2 during the day).

My biggest obstacle is preparing and affording that much meat. I can eat a shitload of meatballs but since that's ground meat, it's not all just protein.
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