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Old 09-06-2010, 12:54 PM   #1
Jason Barrow
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Default Restoring gylcogen before protein postworkout?

Hey guys and gals,

A recent conversation with a colleague led to the suggestion that post-workout, your body will preferentially replenish gylcogen stores and as such, convert anything taken in into gylcogen first and foremost. This would provide the rationalle for a post workout strategy of carbs first followed some time later by protein.

Not sure I buy and I've yet to find any research to support; anybody have any links or thoughts on the matter?

Cheers,
Jason
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Old 09-06-2010, 01:09 PM   #2
Derek Weaver
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I don't think it really matters. Strength work with low to moderate volumes isn't going to do a lot to wear through your glycogen.

I know Lyle's got some stuff, actually based on science, on his site. Go there and search through his articles on the main site as well as his forum.

I seem to remember that he had some Q&A stuff, maybe on Wannabebig.com.
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Old 09-06-2010, 07:21 PM   #3
Andrew Wilson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Barrow View Post
Hey guys and gals,

A recent conversation with a colleague led to the suggestion that post-workout, your body will preferentially replenish gylcogen stores and as such, convert anything taken in into gylcogen first and foremost. This would provide the rationalle for a post workout strategy of carbs first followed some time later by protein.

Not sure I buy and I've yet to find any research to support; anybody have any links or thoughts on the matter?

Cheers,
Jason
I did a research paper in college about this, don't quite remember the details, but I do remember the addition of glucose with the protein intake makes the absorption of protein much more efficient because the need of refilling the glycogen is met with the glucose and the protein isn't used for this, so any post workout should be 50% carbs 50% protein or something
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Old 09-07-2010, 03:19 AM   #4
Darryl Shaw
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Replenishing glycogen stores is a pretty slow process which can sometimes take up to 21 hours so in most cases it's best just to spread CHO intake over the course of the day with regular meals and healthy snacks rather than taking in huge amounts PWO or whenever and avoiding carbs for the rest of the day. If you want to drive yourself crazy weighing, measuring and timing your CHO intake for peak performance though you'll find all the info you need here.
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Old 09-08-2010, 04:01 AM   #5
Jason Barrow
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Thanks for the replies guys,

Darryl you reminded me that I actually have that paper buried away somewhere! Time to dig it out!
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Old 09-18-2010, 12:05 PM   #6
Jason Barrow
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Default Mis-reading/understanding

For Daryl (or anybody who happened to glance at the paper/position stand he provided)...

"Maximal endogenous glycogen stores are best promoted by following a high-glycemic, high-carbohydrate (CHO) diet (600 – 1000 grams CHO or ~8 – 10 g CHO/kg/d)"

Am I understanding this correctly? At 90kg BW, to maximally restore gylcogen I would require 8-10g per kg BW = 720-900g carbs? Given that this would give me around 3500cals alone, I'm definitely getting this mixed up right??!!
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Old 09-18-2010, 02:41 PM   #7
Derek Weaver
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I'm a little confused by that also Jason.

It seems that the part you quoted applied to endurance athletes (makes sense), but then moves into recommendations for resistance training with no actual figures given.

~198 lbs = 90 kg. 720 grams of CHO/day = 2880 calories. Maintenance calories assuming 1 hour of exercise/day would be somewhere around 15*198= 2970 cal/day. You're right. At the bottom end of that you'd be at approx 97% carbohydrate diet. Which makes no sense what so ever.
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Old 09-20-2010, 03:39 AM   #8
Darryl Shaw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Barrow View Post
For Daryl (or anybody who happened to glance at the paper/position stand he provided)...

"Maximal endogenous glycogen stores are best promoted by following a high-glycemic, high-carbohydrate (CHO) diet (600 – 1000 grams CHO or ~8 – 10 g CHO/kg/d)"

Am I understanding this correctly? At 90kg BW, to maximally restore gylcogen I would require 8-10g per kg BW = 720-900g carbs? Given that this would give me around 3500cals alone, I'm definitely getting this mixed up right??!!
You know where I said "If you want to drive yourself crazy....." lol.

Okay, here's how you make all this work for you without going crazy....

1: That figure of 8-10gCHO/kg/d is only really relevant to full time professional athletes or those with physically demanding jobs who also work out. A more general recommendation would be to aim for a CHO intake of 6-10g/kg/d.

2: If the numbers still don't seem right with a lower intake of ~6gCHO/kg/d you might be underestimating your calorie requirements.

3: Once you've got a rough ballpark figure of how much CHO you need go to www.nutritiondata.com and work out roughly how much food you'd need to eat to hit that target. If the volume of food seems ridiculously large look for more energy dense carb sources eg. rice instead of potatoes or whatever.

4: Devise a few simple meal plans which include some healthy snacks that get you to somewhere around your target CHO intake.

5: Finally with all that done just forget about the numbers and eat regular meals that are based around some kind of starchy carbs plus a few healthy between meals snacks and increase or decrease your food intake depending on how you feel.

Note: If all that seems like too much hard work ignore steps 1-4 and do step 5, the results will probably be the same either way.
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Old 09-22-2010, 03:46 AM   #9
Jason Barrow
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Perhaps makes a little more sense with 6g per kg value....

90kg maintenance cals (assuming high activity) = 3168 (198lbsx16)

90kg BW = 540g CHO = 2160cals

Fill in with protein at 2g per kg BW = 180g = 760cals

So CHO + PRO = 2920 cals.

And then fill the rest with EFAs......
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