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Old 10-07-2010, 08:01 PM   #21
Donald Lee
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Originally Posted by Gant Grimes View Post
No need to apologize for Lyle. The whole dispute was over Lyle's claim that a person could only expect to gain 0.5 lb/wk of muscle mass and Rip's examples of people gaining more. Sure, LBM is composed of more than muscle mass, but are you gonna stand by Lyle's 0.5/wk figure?
I've gained close to 0.5 per week, so on pure conjecture, I'd guess that higher than that is possible, especially when you're going thousands of calories per day beyond your baseline. I don't remember how much Zach was supposed to have gained per week, but I wouldn't care too much if someone claimed 0.7 per week. I wouldn't believe it if someone claimed 1.0 per week, unless it was rebound weight gain from prior training or prolonged food deprivation.

Anyways, there's no need to rehash all the arguments, especially when both sides were misinterpreting each other which led to further arguing.

Personally, I'm not a fan of GOMAD style. It definitely works, but I don't think stuffing yourself with much over 750 calories per day in excess of maintenance is necessary. For someone underweight, yes, but for the majority of folks, no.

I think stuffing yourself silly is useful because people can't estimate calories and just don't understand how much they should be eating. It's more of a psychological thing, with bodily implications for sure, but it's not physiologically necessary to get maximum growth.

But yeah, both sides were just flaming at each other. Lyle probably should have been slower in his reactions, as a lot of the conjectures/internet opinions he was basing his comments on turned out to be wrong. Internet hissy fits happen.

I tend not to idolize fitness gurus, because I can think for myself. I love learning from what Lyle has to say, but none of this stuff bothers me. Lyle can be quick to judge in many of his forum responses, which is where a lot of the criticism of him comes from. His articles are pretty much all very well thought out though.
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Old 10-08-2010, 12:50 AM   #22
James Evans
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I tend not to idolize fitness gurus, because I can think for myself. I love learning from what Lyle has to say, but none of this stuff bothers me. Lyle can be quick to judge in many of his forum responses, which is where a lot of the criticism of him comes from. His articles are pretty much all very well thought out though.
Really?

Come on Donald, you're a bright guy but a lot of your posts are "Joel says this..." or "Lyle says that..."

I know you're learning all the time but let's not be so artless.

The whole spat was mindless. A kid coached by a guy who wrote a book called Starting Strength got stronger. In that process to support those gains and his hard work he consumed calories and put on weight. But he got stronger. He did not aspire to some silly 21st Century convention of looking like an andro rent boy and fearing the loss of visible abz. A bunch of keyboard warriors who favour the leg press & coke fuelled Armani models wet their pants about it.

Utterly pathetic.
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Old 10-08-2010, 06:32 AM   #23
Peter Dell'Orto
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You won't know unless you try.
Yeah, and the best thing about linear progression is either it's going to happen or it's not. If you aren't adding weight every workout or every week, you aren't progressing linearly and you can go try something else. If you are, you keep going until you can't. It shouldn't take long to notice if it's working or not.
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Old 03-10-2011, 11:23 PM   #24
Kandy donald
 
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I am beginner in bodybuilding and want to gain weight and
also some strength. please help me in to achieve my goal
with some suggestion.
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Old 11-30-2011, 11:39 AM   #25
Aimee Anaya Everett
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Originally Posted by Kandy donald View Post
I am beginner in bodybuilding and want to gain weight and
also some strength. please help me in to achieve my goal
with some suggestion.
Hi Kandy (and all)- we have 3 amazing articles that are written specifically on Mass Gain. They are some of our most popular and most downloaded articles that have been written for the Performance Menu. You can find them here: http://www.cathletics.com/zen/index....word=mass+gain
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