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Old 01-02-2011, 04:42 AM   #11
Darryl Shaw
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Originally Posted by Mark Fenner View Post
While that study (and studies like it) provides an interesting set of data points, they don't provide real insight. I'll leave the limitations as an exercise for the reader with some answers provided in the link below.

Here's Lyle's take on daily requirements:

http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/mus...-athletes.html


Here's a quote from Lyle that paraphrases Tipton and Wolfe:


That basically sums up our collective scientific knowledge of strengthening, conditioning, and nutrition. We have a ludicrous number of reductionist studies that loose most meaning when placed back into the context of reality. Arguing from individual scientific publications (in S&C, nutrition, and some other fields as well) to actions in the real world for real people is frequently fraught with peril.

Best,
Mark
Lyle says strength/power athletes should aim for a protein intake of 3.3 g/kg/d yet the current (4th) edition of Clinical Sports Nutrition states that the maximal protein requirement of elite athletes is ~1.6g/kg/d.

Who to believe...... the guy selling the fad diet books or one of the most authoritative texts on sports nutrition around?
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Old 01-02-2011, 01:02 PM   #12
Mark Fenner
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Originally Posted by Darryl Shaw View Post
Lyle says strength/power athletes should aim for a protein intake of 3.3 g/kg/d yet the current (4th) edition of Clinical Sports Nutrition states that the maximal protein requirement of elite athletes is ~1.6g/kg/d.

Who to believe...... the guy selling the fad diet books or one of the most authoritative texts on sports nutrition around?
I get your point. I really do. I'm a trained scientist. I love science. I look for scientific evidence and reasoning whenever possible. We're each free to gather evidence from difference sources, analyze and weight that evidence given our experience and the reliability of the source, and make our conclusions.

I guess we have different perspectives on Lyle's credibility. If I want a five minute answer, I'm very satisfied looking to Lyle for advice. If I wanted to assess your recommendation, I'd have to take a ton of time looking at the credibility of that textbook, the research reviewed to reach that conclusion, etc. That would be a general waste.

If I care, the method of resolution is simple: go on a baseline training program for 4 weeks. Consume 1.5g/kg/d. Assess results. Take 2 weeks to re-normalize. Go on baseline training for another 4 weeks. Consume 3g/kg/d. Assess results. Compare consumption 1 and consumption 2. Compare dollars out of pocket. Compare life satisfaction. Make decision.

Done.

Best,
Mark
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Old 01-02-2011, 07:17 PM   #13
Steven Low
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Old 01-04-2011, 05:05 AM   #14
Darryl Shaw
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I get your point. I really do. I'm a trained scientist. I love science. I look for scientific evidence and reasoning whenever possible. We're each free to gather evidence from difference sources, analyze and weight that evidence given our experience and the reliability of the source, and make our conclusions.

I guess we have different perspectives on Lyle's credibility. If I want a five minute answer, I'm very satisfied looking to Lyle for advice. If I wanted to assess your recommendation, I'd have to take a ton of time looking at the credibility of that textbook, the research reviewed to reach that conclusion, etc. That would be a general waste.
I'm not questioning Lyle's credibility it's just that in this instance there's no evidence to support his recommendation.

Quote:
If I care, the method of resolution is simple: go on a baseline training program for 4 weeks. Consume 1.5g/kg/d. Assess results. Take 2 weeks to re-normalize. Go on baseline training for another 4 weeks. Consume 3g/kg/d. Assess results. Compare consumption 1 and consumption 2. Compare dollars out of pocket. Compare life satisfaction. Make decision.

Done.

Best,
Mark
The experiment you describe and others like it have been done many times and the results consistently show that athletes require a protein intake of 1-1.8g/kg/d.
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