Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Community > Community & Events

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-22-2011, 09:05 PM   #1831
John Warkala
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 27
Default

If he got large head metal on metal (MOM) hip replacements, he should get a lot more mileage than just ten years. I'm not a radiologist but have had a hip replacement. His x-rays look like the MOM to me.
John Warkala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2011, 09:29 PM   #1832
Andrew Wilson
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Posts: 1,140
Default

this is aweful. http://media.crossfit.com/cf-video/C...g_Five_PRE.mov je is just lifting his heels to his arse, he isn't even driving forward.

Andrew Wilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2011, 09:37 PM   #1833
Andrew Wilson
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Posts: 1,140
Default

http://media.crossfit.com/cf-video/C...g-thre_PRE.mov
Andrew Wilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2011, 11:00 PM   #1834
Shane Skowron
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 195
Default

That wall setup is hilarious. I'd like to see one elite runner that retracts his shoulder blades and at the same time sticks his butt out and squeezes glutes while running. Just doesn't happen.
Shane Skowron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2011, 11:13 PM   #1835
Andrew Wilson
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Posts: 1,140
Default

hahahaha wow this man http://media.crossfit.com/cf-video/C...ng_tw0_PRE.mov


Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Wilson View Post

Look you do not intentionally "pull your foot up" or intentionally "contract your hamstrings" to bring your foot up - this is how you tear your hamstring.
You don't "stop using the hamstring, because you have to" this is complete nonsense.
Bmac is teaching people how to tear their hamstrings.



In the support phase (middle row, 4th picture in the lagat picture above) you are absorbing impact, just like a box jump, and eccentric muscle action is happening to control this impact and the body sinking, it switches to concentric contraction for the push off and leg drive (middle row, 5th picture, and bottom row). The whole point of this leg drive and pushoff is to propel your center of mass forward (your hips). This is why runners have low vertical jumps and long horizontal jumps- because they're NOT vertical "jumpers", they're horizontal "jumpers"- GLASSMAN. When the leg drive ends into flight phase (top row, 4th & 5th picture), all that muscle tension in the concentric pushoff and leg drive is released into free air being its not fighting the ground anymore; this is why the faster you sprint, the more force generated, the further your leg flys behind you= tension release. THIS IS A REACTIONARY MOVEMENT, NOT VOLUNTARY. The hip flexors in this back leg drive and pushoff are stretched in an eccentric contraction (left leg, top row, 4th picture), in flight phase, this stretched eccentric tension is released, immediately turns concentric, and swings the thigh forward, the hamstrings eccentrically tense to act as stabilizers and control the ROM (this is NOT A VOLUNTARY CONTRACTION), shin folds under, the closer the shin folds into the body, the smaller the lever, smaller levers travel faster.

Bmac isn't teaching ANY OF THIS. He's just saying pull your heel up and lean, this is nonsense.


Andrew Wilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2011, 11:36 PM   #1836
Andrew Wilson
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Posts: 1,140
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shane Skowron View Post
That wall setup is hilarious. I'd like to see one elite runner that retracts his shoulder blades and at the same time sticks his butt out and squeezes glutes while running. Just doesn't happen.
I almost fell out of my chair laughing. All that "midline stabilization" he's telling him to do is restricting movement, blood flow, and wasting energy. The entire torso is suppose to be completely relaxed, even hands and face (notice sprinters like Tyson Gay with flailing hands). Stabilization in running is neurological
Andrew Wilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2011, 11:38 PM   #1837
Corey Kissel
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 76
Default

Well what is it that you really think draws in the competitors of this year's competition?

I just looked at the competitors page on the games site, and i gotta say some of the guys on there have some pretty impressive numbers. I've been following the open/regionals and watching a majority of the competitors in action, and to watch some of them perform really is inspiring. Just to name the ones that stand out in my head - Froning, Salo, Orlando, Lipson, Speal, (but I put Bailey above all of them) and some of the women like Clever, Thorisdottir, etc...

I'm sure for some of these athletes, being in the spotlight may be a first, and why in the world would you want to compete in something else when your the top dawg in your competition.

But some of the numbers those guys can put up are pretty impressive, and with some serious attention to training (although it would be yearsss down the road), some of them may have a chance to compete in very high level Oly/Powerlifting events.

1. Do you really think it's as simple as not having a chance to play another competitive sport and this just fills the void?
2. Could it be the excitement of being at the top of the current standings that keeps these guys focused on nothing else than xfit?
3. Do you think they believe there's really going to be a future where xfit is a legitimate sport, where athletes dream of becoming professional xfitters?
4. Could this be the revolution where xfit is actually an outlet where physical pain results in satisfaction (I want to say masochism but I think that has an underlying sexual connotation that resides without context) and people simply aren't afraid to speak publicly about it? I can't even count the number of interviews where I hear the interviewee say that they're addicted to xfit, and the glow in their eyes would have me believe that they would be doing this in their basement by themselves even if public competitions didn't exist.
5. Is it the social aspects that act as the glue once people are exposed to that secure their continuation?
6. How about the first experience instant addiction? I commonly see people interviewed saying, "For my first workout I did Fran/Angie/Murph/ (inserts girl/hero workout name here) and knew that I'd never turn back." "I crawled to my car and told my wife I couldn't wait to be back tomorrow," etc....Another example of the pleasure/pain interaction?
7. A boredom with previous sporting activities such as track & field, oly lifting, powerlifting etc.?
8. Are the top athletes really oblivious to the inherent danger in some of the workouts programmed by HQ? For instance, the dead/box jump regional workout - didn't someone in regionals rupture their achilles? Weren't there one or two competitors that actually had rhabdo by the end of the regionals that had to withdrawal from competition? Doesn't not knowing what it is that HQ may program induce some type of fear - not the exciting fear where your nervous a little bit about not beating your last time - but a fear instilled that has people seriously coping with the reality of ending up hospitalized due to some awful combination of arbitrarily selected "functional movments" selected from a peanut roaster?? Or do they just not care?

Obviously it's a combination of some/all of the above, most of which I'm sure have been discussed extensively throughout this thread, but just want to hear everyone else's opinions.

Apologies for the overlap some of these questions have likely revived
Corey Kissel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2011, 11:46 PM   #1838
Corey Kissel
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 76
Default

BTW, Andrew - the sprinting explanation you just provided. PHENOMONAL!

Why in the world would people dismiss such an incredibly detailed, scientifically validated showcase of biomechanics/kinematics (I don't know the correct terminology right now it's way too late haha)

Thanks for sharing that with us!
Corey Kissel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2011, 12:17 AM   #1839
Andrew Wilson
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Posts: 1,140
Default

Thanks!
Perfect example:
Andrew Wilson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2011, 02:13 AM   #1840
Derek Weaver
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,642
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew Wilson View Post
I almost fell out of my chair laughing. All that "midline stabilization" he's telling him to do is restricting movement, blood flow, and wasting energy. The entire torso is suppose to be completely relaxed, even hands and face (notice sprinters like Tyson Gay with flailing hands). Stabilization in running is neurological
Andrew,
I read an article a few months back on the corkscrew with the arms in sprinting. Something about how the fascia corkscrews around the body (ie, right shoulder tight often equals a tight/stiff left hip, I think). They had a sprinter, who i can't remember, who had shown big improvements.

I haven't seen anything else about it though.

You hear about this before?
__________________
Quote:
And if you don't think kettleball squat cleans are difficult, I say, step up to the med-ball
- CJ Kim
Derek Weaver is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump




All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:31 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9 Beta 3
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.