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Old 03-26-2013, 12:59 PM   #1
Matthew Beals
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Default Split depth

Been looking at old photos of some super deep split positions, with the front shin way past vertical. I'm assuming these are split snatches, but it got me thinking... is there any advantage to splitting that low in the jerk?

I played with it some and found I was able to get lower, and it seemed faster. My front foot had less distance to travel. Recovery was harder to push up out of such a deep position with the front leg, but not awful.

Wondering if anybody has some pros and cons on this one.
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:58 PM   #2
Jason Denny
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Beals View Post
Been looking at old photos of some super deep split positions, with the front shin way past vertical. I'm assuming these are split snatches, but it got me thinking... is there any advantage to splitting that low in the jerk?

I played with it some and found I was able to get lower, and it seemed faster. My front foot had less distance to travel. Recovery was harder to push up out of such a deep position with the front leg, but not awful.

Wondering if anybody has some pros and cons on this one.
Splitting low means you didn't have enough room to split higher, you couldn't get the weight any higher. That is what I was taught anyway. The only advantage I can see at being that low is the difference between a successful lift and a failed lift. If you are able to even get that low...I'm decent at splitting and I doubt I could get as low as the old pros.
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Old 04-02-2013, 07:49 PM   #3
Tamara Reynolds
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Look at Schemansky's snatch split versus his clean split and his jerk split here:

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Old 04-03-2013, 06:00 AM   #4
Jason Denny
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Look at Schemansky's snatch split versus his clean split and his jerk split here:

Impressive. Look at the lean back on those presses...wow.
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Old 04-03-2013, 12:55 PM   #5
Istvan Samayoa
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With no scientific backing,

my assumption would be knee going past vertical on a jerk will make it harder to recover.

Imagine with full clean vs full snatch - how often do people get pinned with a full snatch?, I have seen it once...it was fricken weird

I imagine same idea, sure you can split snatch lower like that, but you also have less weight to recover from - with jerks you just added like 25% more weight, big difference in recovery.

That being said, I have seen some awesome jerks from people who can get low, but because they split their legs further out, not because they throw their knee out

From my experience, I do not want anything that will let the bar sit in a position that wants it to go more forward then it already wants to go...
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Old 04-04-2013, 04:35 PM   #6
Greg Everett
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Istvan is right on.

try doing a heayy lunge and allowing your knee to move forward over your toe... then do the same lunge never allowing your shin to move forward of vertical. The latter will be far stronger and easier to recover from.

Part of the split jerk is being able to stabilize in that receiving position, part of which is preventing yourself from sliding forward in the split. With the shin vertical this is easy - it's a strong position. Once the shin passes forward of vertical, you very quickly lose that ability to push back off that foot.
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Old 04-07-2013, 11:08 AM   #7
Matthew Beals
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Awesome old photos. Thanks for the pointers -- I will definitely be trying to split lower by getting my feet further out while keeping my shin vertical.
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