Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Training > Olympic Weightlifting

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-05-2013, 06:06 AM   #1
Zach Gray
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4
Default How would you respond to this?



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cce9y...YgYCvw&index=3
Zach Gray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 06:55 AM   #2
David Boyle
Senior Member
 
David Boyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: West Coast/AZ
Posts: 612
Default

that is a tough one..I didn't watch the whole video...getting ready for work now...but his intro has some logic.

training athletes at the high level...you can't afford to get them injured in the weight room... As a strength and conditioning coach, your job and reputation could possibly be on the line....if they get injured on the field of play...the strength and conditioning coach won't be responsible...

with that being said....starting them off light and working the lifts into their program and keeping an ever vigilant eye on your athletes...I don't see these high level guys getting hurt snatching the bar or cleaning 60kg.
__________________
"One must try everyday to expand one's limits."
~Mas Oyama~
David Boyle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 04:13 PM   #3
Matthew Beals
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Berkeley, CA
Posts: 15
Default

*Safety
I quick google turns up this:
http://www.velocitysp.com/multimedia...e_Safety-3.pdf

Scroll down to the 4th page to see where weightlifting rates in terms of safety relative to other activities, including powerlifting and other weight training.

He's just flashing scary pictures.

*Bad technique
.... is bad technique. Get a decent coach?

*"65% of injuries were to shoulders, low back and knees"
Probably the majority of injuries in any sport. These are the parts of the body which are most mobile and subject to the most stress -- except for maybe elbows in throwers and golfers.

*Translation to sport
His points aren't even valid... and later he argues for dynamic lifts. How can dynamic lifts translate to sport and not Olympic lifts?

*Heavy weights can't be moved fast
Weightlifters train to lift the heaviest weight possible, an athlete training for speed and power should obviously work a different part of the Force x Acceleration equation.... ie use lighter weights and the power variations of the lifts.


He obviously has a strong personal bias.
Matthew Beals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 11:14 AM   #4
Aaron Anderson
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 16
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Beals View Post

He obviously has a strong personal bias.
Yeah.
Aaron Anderson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 08:42 PM   #5
Blair Lowe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 590
Default

Commonly held opinions by many of the Powerlifting world.

Some things can be said:

Snatches can put the elbow and shoulder under stress.

It's known that missed cleans can end up being really bad sprains.

Is it really worth the risk for reward?

For some sports and due to how much training time you have, I don't think it is.

While I might think it's neat to have a gymnast train cleans and jerks and snatches, I do not feel it's all that necessary. Probably the same could be said for pitchers or quarterbacks.
Blair Lowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 04:33 AM   #6
Allen Yeh
Senior Member
 
Allen Yeh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 4,246
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blair Lowe View Post

While I might think it's neat to have a gymnast train cleans and jerks and snatches, I do not feel it's all that necessary. Probably the same could be said for pitchers or quarterbacks.
The same could be said for just about anyone really other than with an interest in Olympic weightlifting.

I profess I still haven't watched the video though.
__________________
"And for crying out loud. Don't go into the pain cave. I can't stress this enough. Your Totem Animal won't be in there to help you. You'll be on your own. The Pain Cave is for cowards.
Pain is your companion, don't go hide from it."
-Kelly Starrett
Allen Yeh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 11:40 PM   #7
Richard Bendekovic
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 46
Default

In the last five seasons the University of Tennessee football team has a record of 12-28 in the SEC. I would say the reward is worth the risk. He articulates a laundry lists of benefits and uses Olympic level lifters injury with one example and some vague references. Accurately states bad technique is the primary cause of injury. His athletes are high level, top of the food chain type athletes. If a coach can't teach these type of athletes power cleans and hang power cleans in a very short period of time there is a problem beyond the scope of his presentation.
Richard Bendekovic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2013, 01:05 PM   #8
Zach Gray
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blair Lowe View Post

While I might think it's neat to have a gymnast train cleans and jerks and snatches, I do not feel it's all that necessary. Probably the same could be said for pitchers or quarterbacks.
See this is where American coaches (I say coaches because I know of some sport coaches not allowing the strength coaches to snatch with their players out of fear) are wrong in my opinion, or a number of them anyway.

They are always so scared of hurting their athletes when maybe just maybe, snatching with a pitcher would actually enhance their ability to ward off injuries from sport. I know of strength coaches that will only do pulls with basketball players because they don't want to hurt their wrists.

The guy mentioned coach/athlete ratio's and that certainly could be an issue at some smaller schools but at UT that should be a non issue. Hire as many strength coaches as you need.

But to me the idea of not doing snatches with pitchers or quarterbacks is crazy. Javelin throwers snatch a ton, and the shoulder is easily one of the most important parts of the body to a javelin thrower. Are they exposing themselves to injury or are they strengthening themselves for the demand of their sport? I think the latter.
Zach Gray is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:16 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator