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Old 07-09-2007, 12:43 PM   #21
Ron Nelson
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Shaf just described my bike, sans the flat front tire.

My friend ordered his 29" fixie, but I doubt he'll be taking it on the trail.
Why do most fixie riders go without brakes? I'm not that interested in developing that particular "skill," but I am Jonsing for a 29"er.
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Old 07-09-2007, 01:13 PM   #22
Dave Van Skike
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Fixie's don't need brakes becauxse you can use your legs to slow the rear wheel...which is to say, Most peol who boaught their firt fixie last year when they read up in it in the NYT are such slow cusses that they don't need brakes becuase they only stop at the coffee shop and the REI.

If you put in any actual mileage on a bike and are interested in going fast, you need brakes. messengers can get away without using them but proper use of the front brake is the key to speed.....

the 29'er thing is a bit fadish right now but there is something legit to bigger wheels, not better or worse but very different.

Before there were 29'ers we would just go mountain biking on cyclocross bikes or road bikes with fat tires.....in really pristine conditions a road bike with slicks is fracking fast off road, braking is a bit skittish but it's truly a joy to blow past some chuffer boy DH rig rolling on skinny-ass tires and drop bars....
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Old 01-01-2008, 04:49 PM   #23
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Yesterday I changed my first flat tire. I came back from Christmas at my parents' house, and my back tire was COMPLETELY deflated. It took a while for me to figure everything out, but I finally got it taken care of.

Then, the brilliant thought: "Since I have my back tire off, why don't I flip it around (to make it fixed-gear) before I put it back on?"

All I have to say is, WHOA. It is a completely different experience. I think I like it, but I'll need to try it on a day that is not cold as balls to be sure. It is hard as hell to get my second foot in the clip this way.

Bike messengers on fixies without brakes are insane.
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Old 01-03-2008, 06:19 PM   #24
Gant Grimes
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Your leg strength will greatly improve.

Now there's only one step left to take. http://www.63xc.com/index.htm
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Old 01-04-2008, 08:31 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gant Grimes View Post
Your leg strength will greatly improve.

Now there's only one step left to take. http://www.63xc.com/index.htm
That may be the next step.

Since my last post, I have become fully sold on fixed-gear biking. Cliche, I know, but the feeling of oneness with the bike and the silence of the ride cannot be beat.
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Old 01-05-2008, 03:51 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Forbis View Post
That may be the next step.

Since my last post, I have become fully sold on fixed-gear biking. Cliche, I know, but the feeling of oneness with the bike and the silence of the ride cannot be beat.
Personally I enjoy passing someone on a hill and say "Hey it could be worse...you could have one gear like me"....Yes I am a dick sometimes. lol
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Old 01-05-2008, 12:26 PM   #27
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Chris,
Glad to have you in the club!
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Old 01-17-2008, 07:34 PM
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Old 01-18-2008, 02:01 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfgang Moebius View Post
I've got a question for all you fixie-fanatics: I am currently out of possession of a bike and am looking to purchase a new one come spring. I'm going to have to make my next one last me a good long time. Having not ridden a bike for a couple months (and being only a marginally consistent rider before that - 25miles every once in a while) would it be insane to get a fixed gear instead of a normal bike? If I got one with a switchable-hub that had freewheel on the other side perhaps? Or based on the feeling of a try-out at a bike shop if I can arrange one? (I plan on researching, getting fit to the bike, and looking at used/converted bikes if new ones are too expensive.)

The reason I'm so interested is a hatred of gears (both mechanically and the feeling you get when you're going up a hill windmilling on a tiny gear - I'd rather muscle it up, switchback, or just walk the d*mn thing then try it again another day!) as well as a fascination with the possibilities it opens up - stronger legs, bike-&-me-oneness, pedaling backwards, track-stands, better winter biking (does the control of the fixie help in winter? I'd think so). There aren't too many hills around me so I would be able to practice pedaling quite a bit before I jumped into hills and out of my seat! Any thoughts on a beginner trying out a fixed gear (even if it was reversable hub)? Or should I just get a new regular bike and practice practice until I'm richer, more competent, and handsomer?
My feelings were almost exactly the same prior to buying this past summer. The people at the bike shop were trying to talk me into a geared bike. They were worried that the single-speed would beat me up and I would abandon biking completely (having not biked for fifteen years or so). Better to ease my way in, they thought.

I ignored them, and I couldn't be happier with my purchase. Mine has a reversible rear wheel that has freewheel on one side (where I started) and fixed on the other. I recently switched to fixie and I absolutely love it. I will note that I use mine for shorter rides of 1-7 miles rather than the 25 mile ones you referred to.

Redline 925. Great bike. It's a commuter, so it comes with fenders and a chain guard. I got mine for $500. I would imagine you could get a decent frame converted for cheaper.

edit: Forgot to mention, sweet name.
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Old 01-18-2008, 03:00 AM
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Old 01-18-2008, 04:33 AM   #29
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Wolgang is sweet but Moebius rocks! You have two cool names.
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Old 01-18-2008, 05:27 AM   #30
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Wolfgang,
I second what Chris said.

My only suggestion for newbie fixie riders is learn to ride them first without anything securing your feet to the pedals (cages or clips). Being unable to quickly remove your feet plus learning to stop a fixie equals looking stupid and falling over (once, just once...).

Now I ride clipped in and love it. Go for it. Zen on a bike.

Oh yeah, I'd suggest you put or keep at least one hand brake on it.
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