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Old 07-12-2007, 05:57 AM   #1
chris hill
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Default Patellar Tendonitis

can anyone advise on the immediate treatment for this? It seems to have crept in with an increase of training frequency and intensity after a lay off. Any hints or tips for treating it?
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Old 07-12-2007, 06:24 AM   #2
Mike ODonnell
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anything thing with "itis" is inflammation...so treat it like that...which of course would require Rest, Ice, Compression, Fish Oil, Less Omega 6s etc..etc. Time off usually is required but also look at your diet and make sure it is anti-inflammatory. (If you do a search for that I am sure you will find lots of threads on here with info....sorry too tired to type more as was up till 4am..)

Dr Mike has a thing on inflammation recently too
http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/?p=804
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Numerous studies have shown that while carbohydrates in general cause more of an inflammatory response than other macronutrients, fructose specifically causes the most rapid and intense inflammatory response of all. Polyunsaturated vegetable oils of the omega-6 variety (the majority) are inflammatory, trans fats (all of which start out as vegetable oils) are the worst, and most of the fat of animal, fish and dairy origin are actually anti-inflammatory.
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Old 07-12-2007, 09:00 AM   #3
Ron Nelson
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I'm going out on a limb here (damn my use of unnecessary puns) and suggest some soft tissue work. Foam roll, use a tennis ball, deep tissue massage, ART, are all good ways to work the area above and below the knee.

The above methods got my elbow tendonitis (actually tendonosis as it was much more chronic than "itis") under control.

Not sure about those knee bands they sell. I used one on my elbow for a while and it didn't really help all that much.
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Old 07-22-2007, 07:33 AM   #4
Jesse Woody
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Default itis...

There's a good amount of evidence that jumper's knee, which is often called patellar tendonitis, is actually a condition called tendonosis which isn't as much a factor of inflammation as it's a gradual breakdown of callogen (sp?) in the tissue. Rest and a gradual return to exercise that focuses on eccentrics seems to be the ticket. Ice, ibuprofen, stretching and soft-tissue work can do something in the interim. I've been struggling with this for a number of months and it's a HUGE nuisance. Rest when you can, try to sleep a LOT and put ice on it every time you turn around. That will make it bearable.

A test you can do to find if it's an itis or osis is to rest ice and take ibuprofen consitently. If it's inflammation-related it should clear up in a week or so. For me, that hasn't happened, so I know there's a problem with actual necrosis of the tendonous tissue...ice and pain-killers dull it enough to continue training, which is a necessity at the moment. Good luck!

Here's a couple of links from various forums, etc. that I've found in my search for answers to this:

http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/kneegeeks/3680667701.html
http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/html/steps...endinitis.html
http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/...04/depalma.htm
http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/2000/06_00/khan.htm
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Old 07-22-2007, 03:09 PM   #5
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All good advice so far. I will add:

I would check out your rectus femoris - i'd be willing to bet it's super tight. kelly starrett in all his PT wisdom called that on me and as soon as I got those things loosened up, my knee pain disappeared.

So tons o' stretching of those quads/hip flexors, tons o' ice, and really take a lot of time warming up your legs before training.
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Old 07-23-2007, 06:57 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Everett View Post
I would check out your rectus femoris - i'd be willing to bet it's super tight. kelly starrett in all his PT wisdom called that on me and as soon as I got those things loosened up, my knee pain disappeared.

So tons o' stretching of those quads/hip flexors, tons o' ice, and really take a lot of time warming up your legs before training.
Otherwise known as the "I've been spending too much time on the leg extension machine" muscle.....Hmmmmmm.....Now we know where Greg has been working out....must be the new Cuts around the corner....

Oh yeah...take a foam roller, tennis ball and roll over that....if you love pain, you will certainly enjoy that...but it works.
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Old 07-23-2007, 11:16 AM   #7
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Ice it. stretch, ice...

work the hell out of the joints above and below the knee, hip and ankles. the addice above is good re: staying active, working back in slowly. to avoid reflex atrophy in the VMO and patellar maltracking you need to stay active without aggravating the inflammation. a great excercise with F'ed up knees is KB or DB swings, RDL and straight leg DL. quads work in a stabilizing role

focus on loading the posterior chain, if you keep the weight on your heels you should be able to minimize tension on the knee joint...
work up very slowly.
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Old 07-23-2007, 11:55 AM   #8
chris hill
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thanks for all the advice, i'm soaking it all up and trying to implement as much as possible.

its coming up to two weeks of no squatting and minimal (once a week at rugby training) running. knee now feels fine and i plan to slowly start squatting and sprinting in another weeks time.

DVS, i've been doing just that, every training session i've been alternating between rack pulls, RDLs and single leg DB dl's.
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Old 07-23-2007, 03:22 PM   #9
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Chris-
Not to dog pile, but if you are doing any type of high rep squat'n ala-crossfit (squats, thrusters D-bal etc). It's imperative that you experience NO anterior knee translations during your movements. Again from the gaping maw of Kelly Starrett, this appears to wickedly tighten the R. Femoris and can contribute to significant knee dysfunction.
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Old 07-24-2007, 03:36 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robb Wolf View Post
Chris-
Not to dog pile, but if you are doing any type of high rep squat'n ala-crossfit (squats, thrusters D-bal etc). It's imperative that you experience NO anterior knee translations during your movements. Again from the gaping maw of Kelly Starrett, this appears to wickedly tighten the R. Femoris and can contribute to significant knee dysfunction.
Robb,

Would you please elaborate on that? Are you referring to Anterior Tibial translation? Also, what sort of form malfunction would we be looking for?

Thanks!!!
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