Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Community > Community & Events

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-18-2007, 09:56 AM   #1
Joe Hart
Senior Member
 
Joe Hart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Lino Lakes, MN
Posts: 327
Default My son is trying to drive me nuts...

Conrad my 5 year old goes to Kindergarten in the fall. Refuses to count to 20. It is one of those things that they want the kids to be able to do. 1-12 just fine then it goes 14,16,18, 20. He says he thinks its boring to count to 20. I am trying to work with him about this, but he digs his heels and gets stuborn (I have no idea where he gets THAT ). So is it one of those, let him go for awhile, ride him like a birthday pony, or find something else. Suggestions would be appreciated. Any other school/childrearing nuggets would be great. I have thought about counting money...

That would be Conrad (younger) in the avatar
Joe Hart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2007, 12:07 PM   #2
Elliot Royce
Senior Member
 
Elliot Royce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 317
Default

Well, my only expertise is having 3 children (2 boys and a daughter) but here goes:

your son obviously knows what it means to count to 20. He's counting the even numbers only. So his grasp of mathematics is probably better than a kid who simply memorizes a sequence of numbers that have no abstract meaning. If he starts giving you logarithms instead of integers, you know you have a genius on your hands.

On the other hand, I have found that the school system is in many ways designed just to get you to do what you are told. As long as you do what you are told, you pass. If you demonstrate incredible talent on one assignment and skip the next "because it's boring", you fail. Basic Training 101, but in an industrialized society learning to follow instructions is important. We don't do it naturally, that's for sure!
Elliot Royce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2007, 01:27 PM   #3
Derek Simonds
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Deland, FL
Posts: 4,231
Default

Best of luck with that.

The only suggestion I have is what I refer to as escalation of force.

1) make a game of it and have him only count by or odds or even
2) give him a reward (super small but something he likes) when he does it
3) start discussing the fact that sometimes we have to do things we don't want to or find boring then ask him to show you that he is a big boy and can do it
4) resort to beating the little snot until he does what you tell him
__________________
What we think, or what we know, or what we believe, is in the end, of little consequence. The only thing of consequence is what we do. -John Ruskin

http://westvolusiawellness.com/
Derek Simonds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2007, 01:33 PM   #4
Scott Kustes
Senior Member
 
Scott Kustes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 1,048
Default

I guess smacking the back of his head is out of the question? Like:
Conrad: "1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,14,16"
You: *thwack* "Try again"
Conrad: "1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,14"
You: *thwack* "Skipped a number"
Conrad: "1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14..."
You: "Great job...see when you count right, you don't get hit in the back of the head."

Disclaimer: I have no kids. My only experience with kids was being one. The above is a prime illustration of why I'm not ready for kids.
__________________
Scott

Fitness Spotlight
Scott Kustes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2007, 02:08 PM   #5
John Seiler
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 101
Default

I wish I could offer specific advice on your question. But for a resource that helps with some general insight. there is a FANTASTIC book out there called [i]Raising Cain; Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys[i]. It really goes a lot into why traditional education methods don't mesh with boys' desire to run around the room 500 times. There was also a number of times while reading the book where I thought, "OH! Yeah! I remember going through that." If he's a chip off the old block some of those instances might help you relate. Hope it helps!

http://www.amazon.com/Raising-Cain-P...4792726&sr=8-1
John Seiler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2007, 02:51 PM   #6
Elliot Royce
Senior Member
 
Elliot Royce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 317
Default

Perhaps I should have been more specific -- your kid is smart enough to know how to count to 20 in an interesting way, independent enough to tell you to get lost, and cute enough to appear as your avatar. What more do you need to know?

Know if he tries that stunt when O lifting when older, you'll need to discipline him. "20k, 40k, 60k, 80k, eee-ouch"
Elliot Royce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2007, 03:17 PM   #7
Paul Findley
Member
 
Paul Findley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 95
Default

I agree, counting to 20 is boring. Try just doing it by evens, odds, backwards, by 5, etc. We have this crazy book about a mouse that counts to 100. Spend some time with that, then he will be relieved when you only ask him to count to 20.

Better yet, don't sweat it, if it's not fun maybe you are worried/pushing to hard. We have twins who are 5. One reads really well, the other has had no interest, he is now starting to ask about which letters words start with, he was just not ready, but without us pushing him, he is progressing. Granted he was probably pissed his bro was owning him in the book reading department.
Paul Findley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2007, 03:48 PM   #8
Mike ODonnell
Senior Member
 
Mike ODonnell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,596
Default

Go watch MTV's Sweet 16 show....and you will realize how good you really have it when it comes to kids!!....and then never let him watch TV again...that's your only hope....
__________________
Fitness Spotlight
The IF Life
Mike ODonnell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2007, 04:22 PM   #9
Ron Nelson
Senior Member
 
Ron Nelson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Center of the heterosexual universe
Posts: 547
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Kustes View Post
I guess smacking the back of his head is out of the question? Like:
Conrad: "1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,14,16"
You: *thwack* "Try again"
Conrad: "1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,14"
You: *thwack* "Skipped a number"
Conrad: "1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14..."
You: "Great job...see when you count right, you don't get hit in the back of the head."

Disclaimer: I have no kids. My only experience with kids was being one. The above is a prime illustration of why I'm not ready for kids.
This method worked for my kids.

Oh, my son saw the back seat of a police car for the first time last night.

I told him to get used to the sight. He's 5.

. . .and he counts to 100. . . non-sequentially.
__________________
"Have you seen my weiner?"

http://www.theartofdansilver.com/ron.html
Ron Nelson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2007, 05:19 PM   #10
Steven Low
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,091
Default

He obviously knows how to count to 20. I would suggest giving him something harder to do to challenge him... like some calculus, hehehehehe.

Just kidding, but you get the point. If his teacher tells him in school to do it he probably will. If he's at home and finds it boring, you can tell him to do it once and then have a different challenge to give him or something. Positive reinforcement usually works the best.
Steven Low is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:19 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator