Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Training > Endurance

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-13-2006, 10:34 AM   #11
Jeremy Jones
Senior Member
 
Jeremy Jones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 181
Default

Yes, I have missed you soooo much.



Send money.




now.
__________________
-Jeremy Jones
www.diablocrossfit.com
Jeremy Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2006, 03:48 PM   #12
Neal Winkler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 326
Default

From http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=527120:

Quote:
"Runner's Diarrhea" Mike Pleacher, MD

Yes, they really devoted a full 45 minutes to this. It's hard to believe that people really give a shit (pun!), huh? Apparently, this is a bigger pain in the ass (pun!) than we could even imagine.

About 20-33% of endurance runners complain of lower abdominal cramping and/or a feeling of urgency and frequency during and after long duration races. Moreover, one study found that 20% of runners had occult blood in their stool after they completed a marathon. That kind of data collection must have been a crappy (pun!) job.

Butt (pun!) anyway, it's important to differentiate between upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms. Upper GI problems relate to gastro-esophageal reflux disorder, nausea/vomiting and belching. They generally occur because of low esophageal sphincter pressure, increased gastric acid secretion, and reduced gastric emptying during exercise.

Conversely, lower GI problems "hit you much lower," and may be due to a number of factors:

1) Altered Intestinal Transit Time (also known as "Gum to Bum" time): This time period increases from 35 to 24 hours in sedentary people when they undertake endurance training. Strenuous activity, on the other hand, actually slows down transit time.

2) Changes in GI Tract Blood Flow: Around 80% less blood is delivered to the GI tract during intense exercise. This problem is further exacerbated by dehydration (80% of athletes experience lower GI symptoms when dehydrated by 4% or more).

3) Fluid and Electrolyte Shifts: Beyond just water shifts, there may be implications in terms of electrolyte effects on smooth muscle contraction in the GI tract.

4) Autonomic Nervous System Stimulation: Parasympathetic tone increases during low-intensity exercise; this increase corresponds to decreased transit time. In contrast, high-intensity work decreases parasympathetic tone and has the opposite effect.

5) GI Hormone Secretion: Gastrin, motilin and VIP secretion increase with exercise.

6) Mechanical Causes: I had to throw this one in there, as I was really surprised to hear it. An overly hypertrophied hip flexor, as is commonly seen in runners, can mechanically compress the colon and lead to lower GI distress.

7) Diet and Medications: Lactose intolerance is a differential diagnosis, and the high fiber diet followed by most aerobic training enthusiasts can potentially be excessive. Sorbitol and aspartame have been known to cause osmotic diarrhea, too. Antibiotics may lead to altered bacterial growth, and H2 blockers and magnesium-containing antacids (taken for upper GI relief) can lead to problems in the lower GI region.

All in all, the important point to take away from this presentation is that "aerobic training = diarrhea." Consider yourselves forewarned, cardio bunnies.
Neal Winkler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 11:26 AM   #13
Robb Wolf
Senior Member
 
Robb Wolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,444
Default

I had a dream that "we" cultivated a warm, accepting environment in which cardio and strength athletes could play a frolic, side by side! I've a sneaking suspicion that may be a long shot!
__________________
"Survival will be neither to the strongest of the species, nor to the most intelligent, but to those most adaptable to change."
C. Darwin

Robb's Blog
Robb Wolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 11:34 AM   #14
Greg Everett
Administrator
 
Greg Everett's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,721
Default

perhaps, but what is a man without a dream?
__________________
Olympic Weightlifting: A Complete Guide for Athletes & Coaches

"Without a doubt the best book on the market about Olympic-style weightlifting." - Mike Burgener, USAW Senior International Coach

American Weightlifting: The Documentary
Catalyst Athletics
Performance Menu Journal
Greg Everett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 01:03 PM   #15
Mike ODonnell
Senior Member
 
Mike ODonnell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,596
Default

All depends on how far away the flag is in Capture the Flag.....100 meters...or 12 miles....
Mike ODonnell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2006, 10:59 PM   #16
Motion MacIvor
New Member
 
Motion MacIvor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 25
Default

Rob,
you are not alone. In my mind the the most amazingly fit athletes in the world are road racers (just dont ask them to do a push up ) A good road racer can sprint for 10 seconds grind for hours or chase down a break as long as it takes. the power to weight these guys develop is mind blowing (lance armstrong has posted the highest power to weight ratio on a ever recorded on a concept 2 rower at 4.1). The problem is that they dont have any upper body strength and they have a very limited skill set. When I did my first crossfit workout at crossfit vancouver I immediatly recognized that the CF protocol has the potential to give an athlete roadracer fitness for his/her whole body with a huge skill set that would transfer to any sport (I also play hockey, snowboard, and DH MTB). The reason I started doing crossfit was to become a complete athlete, and to achieve that complete fitness.
So starting last january I focused on crossfit alone. I gained weight, strength and skill but when I went to go ride my bike in march I sucked. It wasnt the end of the world. A couple weeks of hill repeats had me back in the swing of things (actually I was suprised how quickly i adapted to the intervals) but I never really thrived on the epic rides like I used to.
Based on my experience I have I decided that everyone who says that crossfit improved their cycling or running or triathalon was never really that good in the first place. Dont get me wrong I think crossfit is awesome for what it is, but to fully buy into the crossfit program you have to fully buy into Glassmans (and crawley's) definition of fitness. That does'nt really work for me because any time I do something fun I do it for a long time (heh heh) so endurance is more important to me than the rest of the crossfit crew.

It's funny I kind of feel like renne zelwiger in jerry mcguire when tom cruise waves his spirit fingers and says "all i wanna know... is whos coming with me"
I will Rob. I will come with you
Motion MacIvor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 01:35 PM   #17
Neal Winkler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 326
Default

Robb, sorry, but I can't be friends with people that love doing things that make them poop in their pants! :-)

Motion, what was the time period that Lance's power to weight ratio was taken over?
Neal Winkler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 06:14 PM   #18
Motion MacIvor
New Member
 
Motion MacIvor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 25
Default

The Lady who gave the presentation at the CF cert was using 500 m to measure power to weight for the CF athletes. When somebody asked what the highest recorded ratio was she said lance and 4.1. I assume it was over a 500 m distance that probably did'nt take very long at all. But then you know what they say about assumptions.

BTW Neal you're free to hang out with whomever you choose I just know that if I had such high standards I would'nt have any friends at all.
Motion MacIvor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 08:09 PM   #19
Neal Winkler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 326
Default

Mr. Poopy pants (Motion),

I would of guessed that a non-rowing athlete like a 400-800 meter sprinter would be able to put out a way better power ratio than someone like Lance Armstrong in a 500 row. Also, Lance is a better rower than actual rowers? Are we surmising that Lance's long distance training is better for power over a couple minutes than short-term, high-intensity training?
Neal Winkler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 08:39 PM   #20
Mike ODonnell
Senior Member
 
Mike ODonnell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,596
Default

DeVanny and others have done the whole cancer to long term training link (aka marathon runners and distance bicyclists). Just looking at it from the health of the body point of view, long distance training certainly increases the level or cortisol, thereby decreasing glucagon (muscle saving), and also has high oxidative damage. Now all that stress to the body certainly can not be healthy long term. (I am referring to people who do LSD on a consistent basis and not someone who does it for fun on the weekend). If you look at most LSD trainees you will most likely find a higher % of BF, less lean muscle, increase in illnesses, cold, etc, depressed immune system, more joint damage, high levels on inflammation, increased risk of skin and other cancers, and also just a general aging to them (they look older). I think fitness should be concerned with overall health and balance too....otherwise why do we do it? I run/bike distances here and there...but it is certainly not a staple to my training program.

I usually say sprinters can have decent edurance over longer distances, but joggers usually are not good sprinters. Of course you train for your needs.
Mike ODonnell is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:23 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator