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Old 04-05-2008, 07:44 PM   #1
Brandon Enos
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Default Yoga?

I have noticed a decrease in my flexibility. I was never very flexible, but for a guy my size, I surprised many people, coming just centimeters from my toes and maybe somwhere between 6" and 1 foot of a full side split. But as said, Im losing flexibility, especially in my hamstrings. I know its just going to get worse as Im going to be doing starting strength next week so I need to get some more stretching into my 'program'.

My question is, how beneficial is yoga compared to say something like Pavel's Relax into Stretch? Should you do both, yoga and static stretching, just vary nights or what not? Im not looking at necessarily becoming very flexible, just regaining my lost ground (though wouldnt turn down gaining some more in the process).
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Old 04-06-2008, 08:15 AM   #2
sarena kopciel
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I started threads about this a while back as I noticed I was losing some flexibility as I was lifting more. And I am a yoga teacher to boot!

http://www.performancemenu.com/forum...highlight=yoga
http://www.performancemenu.com/forum...highlight=yoga
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Old 04-07-2008, 06:55 AM   #3
Garrett Smith
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Stretching:

Just do it. Often. Hammies twice.
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Old 04-07-2008, 07:59 AM   #4
Mike ODonnell
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Ever see a Tiger stretch out before it runs? (random nature observation #325)

Do full ROM dynamic movements....full squats, lunges, etc.....that and get plenty of Magnesium....helps keep the muscles more relaxed.

Also...too much flexibility may lead to joint instability which could also translate to loss of power in movements.....so don't overdo it.
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Old 04-07-2008, 10:48 AM   #5
Garrett Smith
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Animals stretch all the time...
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Old 04-11-2008, 04:28 AM   #6
Chris Lowndes
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Default stretching

Hello,

The animal shown there is pandiculating, i.e. contracting the muscles alongside the spine, and not necessarily stretching the muscles on the abdomen. All vertebrates contract muscle groups on awakening or after a period of sedentary activity. This is different to lengthening by pulling and risking the invoking of the stretch reflex; this reflex is there for a purpose.

So try lengthening by contracting, similar to pnf but without the lengthening or stretching aspect at the end of the movement. Lengthen within your natural ROM; unless that is you partake in an activity that desires extreme ranges of movement i.e. martial arts or gymnastics.

Chris
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Old 04-11-2008, 06:43 AM   #7
Garrett Smith
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Chris,
After looking up pandiculating definitions, it would seem to be the same thing as "active" stretching, or concentrically contracting an agonist on one side which therefore eccentrically lengthens the other side.

I believe what you're differentiating it from is "passive" stretching, which I'm not a big fan of either. I am a big fan of improving ROM of natural movements, I have also found that I will not make much progress on my hamstrings without some devoted attention and time spent in a "stretched" position. That being said, I do nearly all of my hamstring stretches in a standing position, both straight- and bent-kneed, using my hip flexors to maintain lumbar lordosis as the hamstrings are reaching the end of their "active" flexibility ROM.

I think we're on the same page, and I sure believe that the "downward dog" that the tiger in the picture is doing is definitely stretching both the muscles in the back of its rear legs and possibly on the abdomen. Contracting one side to stretch the other after a period of inactivity would seem to kill two birds with one stone IMO.
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Old 04-11-2008, 07:01 AM   #8
Chris Lowndes
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Default Stretchimg

Hello Garrett

I think we are on the same page, just words. I prefer to contract to lengthen on the other side, may be stretched on the non contracting side [if tight] but generally i get unstretched lengthening from the passive side, that make any sense?

I think the problem comes with extreme ranges of movement which do come with a problem, that of instability. Also people "warming up" with stretching, you dont cook a piece of meat by pulling it. Saw some people on a snowy river bank last weekend being coached [kayaking] and bouncing and touching there toes, made me wince.

Lengthen with awareness.

Regards

Chris
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Old 04-17-2008, 10:37 AM   #9
Arden Cogar Jr.
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I've been an avid Yoga practicioner for about five or six years now. I originally started with classes then moved to private instruction. Over time, I developed my own routine and I follow it religiously. I probably do it about 10 to 15 times per week. Always Pre and Post Workout. Sometimes before bed or upon waking on days I compete or have heavy event training planned.

I've found that these preworkout sessions and pre-event training sessions are better since I incorporated some foam rolling into the mix. For some reason it loosens me up even further.

The older I get, the more important this sessions become and more I add to the routine to hopefully improve my overall fitness.

There's a lot of good and bad press for passive stretching pre workout. I don't consider a lot of the movements I perform passive by any stretch of the imagination. While I'm limited by my size from doing a lot of the more advanced poses, I do my own versions that I feel in the areas that I need.

To me, just about anything that furthers our fitness goals is a good thing. Yoga/stretching is necessary from my thoughts.

All the best,
Arden
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Old 04-17-2008, 12:04 PM   #10
Mike ODonnell
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Like already discoursed about...animals stretch usually after being sedentary...which according to my dogs is an all day event....but then again I've seen her go from laying asleep to a full sprint to chase a squirell and never came up short holding her hammies....

Anyways....stretching before workouts/sports I would never recommend as you are creating muscle tears and will most likely reduce performance and increase risk of injury due to joint instability and muscle imbalances....active warmups with increasing dynamic movements to increase ROM & body temperature and quick burst of movement to increase CNS activation...I would always suggest.

In the end...if you pull a muscle chances are it's not solely because of tightness but antagonistic muscle imbalances that create the issue in the first place.
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