Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Training > Combat Sports

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-11-2008, 06:15 PM   #11
Yael Grauer
Senior Member
 
Yael Grauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 1,590
Default

I don't think you need to try to have a better attitude. It is what it is. I think you just need be aware of how you react, which it sounds like you are.

Plus if I was in that situation I would totally ask for a rematch. And I think that's perfectly acceptable.
__________________
http://yaelwrites.com
Yael Grauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 04:21 AM   #12
Derek Simonds
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Deland, FL
Posts: 4,231
Default

Anton reading where you are as far strength I agree I do think you have a great baseline of ME Strength. Tell Scotty what you are after and I am sure that he can throw in a little additional work for you.

Yael and I have both started threads on here about strength / conditioning training for MMA / BJJ. Mine was back in March of last year maybe? Where we discuss different training methodologies for what we were trying to accomplish.

I believe that there is sport specific strength in grappling that is more comparable with what I think gymnastics call static strength (maybe). There are a lot of times when I am grappling that I think I am an anaconda and just slowly add more and more pressure on the move I am making every time my opponent gives me room. You have to be able to be under tension for longer periods of time to finish some moves.

Great thoughts from everybody btw.
__________________
What we think, or what we know, or what we believe, is in the end, of little consequence. The only thing of consequence is what we do. -John Ruskin

http://westvolusiawellness.com/
Derek Simonds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 06:50 AM   #13
Yael Grauer
Senior Member
 
Yael Grauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 1,590
Default

Oh yeah, I almost forgot.

http://www.grapplearts.com/2005/09/l...r-opponent.htm

http://www.grapplearts.com/2006/12/b...-guy-again.htm

prolly you know all this already but it's a good reminder
__________________
http://yaelwrites.com
Yael Grauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 07:26 AM   #14
Rob Harris
New Member
 
Rob Harris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Chattanooga,TN
Posts: 27
Default

Maybe try a different outlook on things? Try and realize that everyone is there for the same reason, to improve. When you're rolling/sparring, remember this and don't look at it like win or lose. If you always tap out the newer guys and only tap to more experienced partners, you are holding yourself and those you spar with back.

Professor Pedro Sauer (Red and Black belt under Helio/Relson) says to 'sponge moves off of everyone' and tap as much as you can. That way, you see everyones game and learn what they know.

Easier said than done I know, but it works.
__________________
Ignis Aurum Probat

http://CrossFit Chattanooga Homepage
Rob Harris is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 01:16 PM   #15
Yael Grauer
Senior Member
 
Yael Grauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 1,590
Default

I don't understand what's wrong with sparring with the intent to win. I spar with the intent to win and I lose all the time and the world keeps spinning. But I mean, as long as you don't get unhinged and lose sleep over it if you don't win, or act like a jerk when you do, why is it wrong to want to win?

I like the Art of the Tap article and working with one's partner instead of against them but I don't think there's anything wrong with wanting to win. In fact, what's REALLY annoying is people who you can tell secretly want to win but they pretend they're all enlightened and don't care. They are the ones that will stop in the middle of the roll and start coaching if they are losing, or will use all possible strength after going way too easy if you catch 'em in a mistake. I think being honest about it is a lot healthier than being passive aggressive.

Sometimes I roll to win, sometimes I'm working on a specific skill or position, sometimes I am working to help a newbie improve their game, sometimes I just want to not think. It's all good.
__________________
http://yaelwrites.com
Yael Grauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 01:54 PM   #16
Derek Simonds
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Deland, FL
Posts: 4,231
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yael Grauer View Post
Oh yeah, I almost forgot.

http://www.grapplearts.com/2005/09/l...r-opponent.htm

http://www.grapplearts.com/2006/12/b...-guy-again.htm

prolly you know all this already but it's a good reminder
Those are great links Yael. I have seen them before but like you said it is a great reminder.
__________________
What we think, or what we know, or what we believe, is in the end, of little consequence. The only thing of consequence is what we do. -John Ruskin

http://westvolusiawellness.com/
Derek Simonds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 02:55 PM   #17
Anton Emery
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 145
Default

Yea, i think alot of grappling is static strength, or sub-maximal isometric contractions. Like when i taking someones back i try to get the over/under body lock with my arms and keep my chest pressed up and inline with their back. Other parts of the game seem to be more explosive, like takedowns.

Thanks everyone for the advice and tips. I am going to keep working on it all.


Anton
Anton Emery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 03:10 PM   #18
Anton Emery
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 145
Default

I look at rolling kind of three ways. If its someone less experienced i can work on stuff and put myself in the same position repeatedly because its easier to control the direction of the roll. It does me and the other person not much good if i just crush them the whole time, better to open up my game and experiment and give them the chance to escape and work on different parts of their game.

If its someone of my own level or close they are probably going to bring their A game, so in that case we are both rolling to win. I am going to work towards my strongest positions and submissions.

If its someone more advanced i am in survival mode. I'll be happy if i can get on top or go on the offensive, but mostly i am just trying to survive.

The thing i guess i have most trouble dealing with mentally is that guys with less experience than me seem to be picking up the game faster. I've had my blue belt about a year, and there are guys who got theirs a few months ago who now dominate me in rolls. I can catch them in subs some, but i am usually always fighting from bottom or escaping. I think the top game is something that is going to take a while for me, i don't have an easy time "getting heavy". I guess everyone advances at a different rate, and that time in the sport is not the only factor. If so those that have been doing BJJ longer would always win.

Nothing else to do but keep working on it.


Anton
Anton Emery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2008, 12:14 AM   #19
Yael Grauer
Senior Member
 
Yael Grauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 1,590
Default

I think I've got an okay top game for a beginner, except that everyone has thirty or more pounds on me so I get flipped over all the time even when I've got good position and am doing things "right". There's one girl that's only 150 but she wrestled in college so I always end up getting spun in circles. She's really good but she makes me dizzy. lol.

I hate playing bottom esp. when the guys are bigger and new so I get smothered without them even noticing. I know I could just shrimp out slowly and eventually work my way out in about fifteen years. And then as far as subs go I can't get a triangle because my legs won't fit around their shoulders, and whenever I try to go for an armbar I get my knee smashed in my face and end up in someone's side control and none of my sweeps ever work. It sucks. I am trying to position myself against our padded walls so I can get my feet up and do that flippy thing and end up with side, which is the funnest move ever. Plus I can hold side pretty well. I can also sneak into mount sometimes if the guy's thinking too much about why I can hold side and isn't paying attention, but then I get flipped. I need to gain like eighty pounds or something.

Some folks at my gym will talk while we roll, which is great, because then I can tell them they are rolling the wrong way or need to get their hooks in before trying a sub because that's why it didn't work, and they can tell me the reason I am getting thrown like a rag doll is because my base isn't wide enough. I guess I am helping them get better, which is hard when they're new and we're almost evenly matched, but I figure if their technique improves they will use less weight, which will help me.

I think MMA is like the most frustrating thing ever, but what probably cured me from the run o' the mill frustrations was training at a gym where every guy there was an asshole. So now I am just happy that people will roll with me without me begging them and having to set up mats next to their mats so I can do my own drills as I get sat out over and over and over again. So maybe that's what you need. Go to a gym where everyone's a jerk for a while.

Anyway, I guess I was surprised to read these issues still come up even after you're at blue belt level... I figured it was just a newbie awkward stage I hadn't gotten through yet...
__________________
http://yaelwrites.com
Yael Grauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:32 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator