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Old 05-13-2008, 02:50 PM   #1
Elliot Royce
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Default Conditioning for hockey

I've taken to wearing a Polar HR monitor during hockey games. Over the course of an hour, my average HR is about 145bpm and the maximum is 187bpm. I'll try to post the printout of the measurements but basically the HR leaps to around 170bpm in 30s and then declines for 3-4m to around 130bpm, followed by another leap. This continues throughout the game. I note that the recovery period remains around the same during the game which I think means that I'm not getting completely exhausted.

I've been trying to do interval training off-ice and that has succeeded in bringing the recovery rate down from 140bpm to 130bpm while I'm on the bench.

To note: 1100 calories burned per session.

Any thoughts on whether I need to get better conditioned (are these numbers good or bad or what) and how I could do so?
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Old 05-13-2008, 03:04 PM   #2
Dave Van Skike
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The numbers are only comparable to you. The best use I've found for a HR monitor is to make a note of how quickly your HR returns from "hard effort" to "normal" easy activity For me 120-130 would be total recovery..170 is fast cruise mode and 185 is middle of redline, max HR around 215...

you've found your own magic numbers for that activity and see how it changes, going from 185 to 120 in a minute or so is a good goal, I used a lot of breathing tricks to try to work that angle.

working recovery on skates is probably similar track bike intervals. Set rest periods usually worked for me. one minute on two off..gradually reducing the work/rest to 1:1 for sets of 5. Another that works but sucks is double distance/half the rest.

sprint 100m:rest 50m
sprint 200:rest 100
sprint 400:rest 200
sprint 800:rest 400..

on a track bike you can do this for quite a while. the key is to start each interval with a 5 second all out jump sprint and try to survive the balance of it.
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Old 05-13-2008, 05:37 PM   #3
Mike ODonnell
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How many times a week are you playing? Are you really thinking you need better recovery? (not talking about your HR monitor, talking about how you feel playing the game and your speed and fatigue factor in the 3rd period.)

Want to get in the best shape for hockey? Then skate your **** off for your shift and come back and recover. Repeat for 2 hours then drink beer.....has worked for 15+ years for me....
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Old 05-13-2008, 06:24 PM   #4
Dave Van Skike
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this makes a lot more sense than what i came up with, plz disregard

...better post workout recovery planin MOD's plan too.
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Old 05-13-2008, 06:45 PM   #5
Mike ODonnell
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Beer...the pwo drink for athletes...Irish and Canadian scientists hard at work!
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/liv...766&ito =1490
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Old 05-13-2008, 08:42 PM   #6
Jared Buffie
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There's no replacement for skating. Even when I played competetavely (that's relative, of course), I would workout in the summers doing all kinds of things but it never prepared me for the first week or so of training camp in the fall.

For whatever reason, I always found hockey to be a different animal.

For men's league, MOD has it nailed. In fact, I no longer play but I miss the beers with the guys after the game more than the game itself.

If you ever want a real workout, drop the mitts with someone. That will get your heartrate up there.
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Old 05-14-2008, 01:58 PM   #7
Mike ODonnell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Van Skike View Post
on a track bike you can do this for quite a while. the key is to start each interval with a 5 second all out jump sprint and try to survive the balance of it.
As I was running and biking today...this thought rang out true. (I remember hearing this from an ex-pro tri guy I used to do track workouts 400/800 with...and he owned my ass on all the runs). As he said...to train by starting off hard and maintaining...than trying to go out slower and speed up later. Same can be said for a hockey game or shift, it's easier to jump out and keep it up (although painful still) than to sit back and try to accelerate later (of course depends on your position and where the play of the puck is at that time).

As for any of my sports/cardio...I just always start off hard....and then try and keep it up for however long I am going for. It sucks....it's painful....I'm running like a kid on sugar....but it works for me. By the end of the trail I run (1.5 miles) which is up and down....or the MTB trail on a single speed (so I have to haul ass up and hill and then take it easy riding down for 30min straight)...I pretty much want to puke...but I am sure it is working to improve my endurance and recovery. I don't do track workouts anymore....I just want fun training (and always a nice cold beer to recover with). I think I'll name my training program.....Balls Out, Beer After....or BOBA for short. Should be a best selling ebook soon for only 9 payments of $39.99.
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Last edited by Mike ODonnell : 05-14-2008 at 02:14 PM.
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Old 05-14-2008, 02:18 PM   #8
Dave Van Skike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
As I was running and biking today...this thought rang out true. (I remember hearing this from an ex-pro tri guy I used to do track workouts 400/800 with...and he owned my ass on all the runs). As he said...it's easier to start off hard and maintain...then try and speed up later. Same can be said for a hockey game or shift, it's easier to jump out and keep it up (although painful still) than to sit back and try to accelerate later (of course depends on your position and where the play of the puck is at that time).

As for any of my sports/cardio...I just always start off hard....and then try and keep it up for however long I am going for. It sucks....it's painful....I'm running like a kid on sugar....but it works for me. By the end of the trail I run (1.5 miles) which is up and down....or the MTB trail on a single speed (so I have to haul ass up and hill and then take it easy riding down for 30min straight)...I pretty much want to puke...but I am sure it is working to improve my endurance and recovery. I don't do track workouts anymore....I just want fun training (and always a nice cold beer to recover with). I think I'll name my training program.....Balls Out, Beer After....or BOBA for short. Should be a best selling ebook soon for only 9 payments of $39.99.

"Float the middle"

The classic example is the kilo in track cycling takes something north of a minute.

You explode the start, hit tempo (throw up in your mouth a little)..."float the middle 400 or so meters and punch the last 200 or so meters. The pain of the minute is nothing compared to teh pain of the 5 that follow...

what a stupid sport.
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