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Old 06-17-2008, 10:02 AM   #121
Steven Low
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Originally Posted by Cosmo Mazza View Post
I posted a similar question over on CF before seeing this thread is asking my exact question. Given the pyramid that has developed with sport at the peak. How does this translate into your program design?

I've read SS and PP but it's not clear to me...I guess I'm just slow.

I'm sure it depends on the individual and the sport(s), but I'm interested in hearing your approaches.

Thanks
Sport specific skills come near the bottom of the pyramid. Well, specifically they should be strongly integrated into the power/strength/endurance aspect of training or the metabolic conditioning if the sport requires it.

All of the actual "factors" below sport add to up to make it so that you can play it well. For instance, nutrition, strength/power/endurance, recovery, conditioning, etc. all contribute to how well you can play said sport. Most elite athletes aren't that way because they just play or practice the sport (one exception might be basketball); in everything else like football, gymnastics, etc. strength and conditioning especially with sport specific skills in that manner is integral to becoming good at the sport on game day. This is why sport is at the top in the pyramid.
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Old 06-17-2008, 10:22 AM   #122
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Great stuff. This really took off while I was gone.

For elite athletes in their physical prime:

1. Genetics
2. Sport


For everyone else:

1. Genetics
2. Nutrition
3. Movement and strength
4. Metcon

Sport can appear anywhere above genetics. How many people do you hear about/know that are good at sports despite lack of speed/strength/conditioning?
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Old 06-17-2008, 07:20 PM   #123
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. How many people do you hear about/know that are good at sports despite lack of speed/strength/conditioning?
Well, I do know a few who were on my wrestling team last year

A few with incredible technique, yet overall not very athletic (OK maybe horribly unathletic would be a better description ), kids on my team would go out and crush the muscular and athletic kids they wrestled. It was pretty satisfying to watch, really

On the downside, just about all of them were injured during the course of the season, and for two of them it screwed up their hopes for going to the regional/state competitions. Extra strength helps injury proof you, IMHO.
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Old 06-17-2008, 07:36 PM   #124
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Originally Posted by Cosmo Mazza View Post
I'm sure it depends on the individual and the sport(s), but I'm interested in hearing your approaches.
As a geriatric novice at the Highland Games (aka Scottish Heavy Athletics), here's my approach as a data point. I've been fairly hard on my body over the years, so I need to include prehab/rehab in my training. I need to have a strength focus, but still get some conditioning. Spending all day throwing heavy implements is rather demanding, particularly when the weather leaves something to be desired. Some meets also throw in the kilted mile.

Highland Games are seasonal in Colorado and neighboring states so it makes sense to plan around that. If your sport is year round in your area, you can just pick a particular meet to peak for. At any rate I picked the Long's Peak Highland Games this September as a target, with the intent to enter some earlier competitions to get some experience (compete early and often). I like Dan John's approach of dividing the year into overlapping periods of heavy lifting, heavy throwing, and competition, but I'm not really doing that this year. It's more like an experiment as I rehab my right knee and left shoulder, try to get stronger, and learn the events.
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Old 06-18-2008, 04:59 AM   #125
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Originally Posted by Gant Grimes View Post
For everyone else:

1. Genetics
2. Nutrition
3. Movement and strength
4. Metcon
So, when do we get the program for developing superior genetics?

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Old 06-18-2008, 07:48 AM   #126
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So, when do we get the program for developing superior genetics?

In about 10-15 years. Bring your checkbook.
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Old 06-18-2008, 08:28 AM   #127
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Strength Circuit (ala Robb Wolf) 3-5 x 2- 5 reps

Deadlift or Squat
Weighted Ring Dip
Weighted Pull up

Anton
I know this is an old post, but could someone please explain what this Robb Wolf-style strength circuit is?

I seem to remember a post where he talked about training clients with novice level strength and utilizing some sort of circuit, but I can't seem to find it for the life of me!

Thanks

On a more on-topic note, I was a CF'er who started SS, but after ending the cycle didn't want to go back to CF. So I made up my own sort of "hybrid" training by arranging slow lifts, metcons, and some o-lifts around each week. I would sit out at my computer, make a list of all the days I would train, put in my "Strength" and rest days, and then sprinkle a few metcons in where I could.

I've been doing this since early April and so far I've acheived:

(16 yo, 5'6", 135lb)
245x5 Back Squat
290x5 Deadlift
120x5 Press
165x3 Bench

About a month in I suffered a major setback with appendicitis, too. The gains keep coming (though I've hit a wall with my squat recently). I'm in decent shape, too, but now I'm working on more conditioning to make wrestling practices more bearable.
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Old 06-18-2008, 10:49 AM   #128
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It was in the article for the fighter prep.

He utilized the following
deadlift
ring dips
weighted pullups
using 3-5 sets reps of 1-3 reps in a circuit fashion with 1 minute between each exercise, stopping the effort at 15 minutes.
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Old 06-18-2008, 11:04 AM   #129
Anton Emery
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Originally Posted by Chris Bate View Post
I know this is an old post, but could someone please explain what this Robb Wolf-style strength circuit is?

I seem to remember a post where he talked about training clients with novice level strength and utilizing some sort of circuit, but I can't seem to find it for the life of me!

Thanks

On a more on-topic note, I was a CF'er who started SS, but after ending the cycle didn't want to go back to CF. So I made up my own sort of "hybrid" training by arranging slow lifts, metcons, and some o-lifts around each week. I would sit out at my computer, make a list of all the days I would train, put in my "Strength" and rest days, and then sprinkle a few metcons in where I could.

I've been doing this since early April and so far I've acheived:

(16 yo, 5'6", 135lb)
245x5 Back Squat
290x5 Deadlift
120x5 Press
165x3 Bench

About a month in I suffered a major setback with appendicitis, too. The gains keep coming (though I've hit a wall with my squat recently). I'm in decent shape, too, but now I'm working on more conditioning to make wrestling practices more bearable.
Chris,

Cool that you wrestle. I do Brazillian Juijitsu, so i am looking for a similar type of fitness. My workouts need to enhance my grappling, not tire me out for class.

There is a link to a Word doc on this post by Art Devaney where Robb talks about it too.

http://www.arthurdevany.com/?p=709

http://www.arthurdevany.com/Food%20Exercise.doc

I think he basically alternates Back Squats or Deadlifts along with dips and pull ups in a strength circuit designed to quickly get people up to 2XBW Squat and 2-2.5xBW Deadlift. After that he would do some sort of brief but potent metcon.

Sounds like a good way to go, especially when you are trying to wrestle a 200lb opponent the next day.


Anton
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Old 06-18-2008, 12:40 PM   #130
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How many people do you hear about/know that are good at sports despite lack of speed/strength/conditioning?
Bowlers.....
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