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Old 06-09-2008, 12:49 PM   #11
John Seiler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
FYI.....a $1 Double cheeseburger is close to a Zone ratio (although higher fat).....and they taste sooooo good. Great quick fix if you need one on the road...
This is truly great news!!! Uh, for when I'm on the road and stuff...
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Old 06-09-2008, 06:52 PM   #12
Patrick Donnelly
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
FYI.....a $1 Double cheeseburger is close to a Zone ratio (although higher fat).....and they taste sooooo good. Great quick fix if you need one on the road...although I only eat 1/2 the bun and get it without ketchup. I believe it is actually just as high in MUFA as it is in SAT fats too.
Just thinking of McDonald's makes me want to vomit. How can anyone eat that crap? The only thing McDonald's has going for it is that it's completely vegetarian - you won't find any meat in their burgers!
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Old 06-10-2008, 07:30 PM   #13
Scott Kustes
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Health and performance are two very different things though. As Mike said, check the health of most elite athletes once they hit 40 and beyond. NFL athletes are likely the worst off, between the poor diets and the overall wear and tear.
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Old 06-11-2008, 09:00 AM   #14
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The guy is hardly ripped to shreds, good shape none the less but could be a whole lot better if he cleaned up his diet. Can't beat Mexican and Pizza when gorging junk though....
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Old 06-11-2008, 07:43 PM   #15
Mike ODonnell
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Originally Posted by Patrick Donnelly View Post
Just thinking of McDonald's makes me want to vomit. How can anyone eat that crap? The only thing McDonald's has going for it is that it's completely vegetarian - you won't find any meat in their burgers!
In dealing with the general everyday public you will find two things....they will not make time to cook no matter what you tell them to eat...and obesity is rampant in lower income families....so finding realistic solutions to real problems are needed.....if that means finding healthy fast food choices, then it must happen.....as they are not going to spend $9/lb on grass fed beef and organic veggies.

As far as pro athletes....there is a reason they many "blow up" after they retire and put on 50+lbs in like the first year....they eat the same crap and no longer exercise 4 hours a day....that and I bet the rates of heart disease for football linemen over 40yrs old is extremely high.

Did that guy above shave his legs?
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Old 06-11-2008, 08:17 PM   #16
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The post was funny but im sure as MOD said he will be dealing with his share of health problems after he's done because it looks like he is not gonna be putting down the mcdonalds, taco bell, or pizza any time soon.

BTW.. imnot a football fan but I have grown fond of the Panthers Boo Redskins
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Old 06-11-2008, 10:07 PM   #17
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Mike's right that the lineman have a multitude of health issues. I think I remember seeing a statistic where the average age of death for a retired NFL Player was in his mid 50's. Partially from the lineman's excessive and artifically maintained weight (not meaning steroids, but fast food, lots of it etc.) as well as the pounding their bodies take.
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Old 06-24-2008, 04:40 PM   #18
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We haven't seen anything yet. I remember in the 90s, Nate Newton was a big deal because he was the Cowboys first regular starter to weigh over 300 pounds. In the early 90s, there were only about 10 NFL starters over 300 pounds! Now there are at least 2 300 pounders on every large high school line.

In the next 5 years, Nate, Refrigerator Perry, and the other OGs of largeness will be hitting 50. I fear things will not be pretty.
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Old 06-24-2008, 04:55 PM   #19
Dave Van Skike
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[QUOTE=Chris Bardwell;32481]

QUOTE]

OMFG...ewww gross he's like, morbidly obese , he'll probabaly die soon......

Get real.


six pack abs do not equal fit and healthty (heroin much?), nor does a little gut mean imminent death and little extra goes a long ways in strength sports.....

OTOH, not many average height guys (5'10-6'1) that are over 275 and "ripped" excluding those undergoing self-diagnosed hormone therapy...not that there's anything wrong with that..just saying...

if you need a big motor for your sport, its going to get a little sloppy

further, the long term health problems of NFL players might stem from a couple of factors...things like repeated heavy blows to major joints, head, neck and back....
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Old 06-24-2008, 05:07 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Dave Van Skike View Post
OMFG...ewww gross he's like, morbidly obese , he'll probabaly die soon......

Get real.


six pack abs do not equal fit and healthty (heroin much?), nor does a little gut mean imminent death and little extra goes a long ways in strength sports.....

OTOH, not many average height guys (5'10-6'1) that are over 275 and "ripped" excluding those undergoing self-diagnosed hormone therapy...not that there's anything wrong with that..just saying...

if you need a big motor for your sport, its going to get a little sloppy

further, the long term health problems of NFL players might stem from a couple of factors...things like repeated heavy blows to major joints, head, neck and back....
NFL linemen and heart disease....as real as it gets

Quote:
Linemen also have a higher rate of diabetes, thicker heart walls and a greater rate of obesity and high blood pressure. They're also 54 percent more likely to have enlarged hearts than other NFL players. Among lineman, 36.9 percent had enlarged hearts, compared with 24.5 percent of other retired players.
http://www.livescience.com/healthday/601353.html


Quote:
Retired National Football League (NFL) linemen -- generally the heaviest players -- are more than twice as likely as the general population to have a syndrome that puts them at risk of heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular (CV) diseases, according to a recent study by the Living Heart Foundation (LHF).
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/n...ory_65013.html

and
Quote:
Ex-NFL Linemen at High Risk for HBP & Heart Disease

According to Dr. Arthur Roberts, a retired NFL Quarterback and a respected heart surgeon, NFL linemen develop high blood pressure and heart disease more than twice as often as members of the general US population

While the reasons for this are not entirely clear, Dr. Roberts suspects that a combination of factors may be to blame, including:

* A very high body mass
* Failure to shed weight after retiring

Additionally, Roberts thinks that the variety of injuries that linemen commonly suffer likely lead to lower levels of exercise once their playing days are done, which also increases their risk of obesity related health concerns like high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome, and heart attack.

Research like this seems to suggest that even though many of these professional athletes get regular exercise and are in the prime of life, they still suffer long term effects from being so overweight during their careers.
http://highbloodpressure.about.com/b...rt-disease.htm

There can be large people who may have low risks for heart disease but I will bet it is directly related to low insulin resistance and low inflammation risk factors....something which these athletes who down tons of carbs, most likely have large insulin resistance, border on diabetes, and have high levels of inflammation from all those years playing/training along with all the other typical risk factors.

I personally could care less about any other guys abs...but if they are unhealthy then it wont matter if they are ripped or overweight...they will still be dead.
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Last edited by Mike ODonnell; 06-24-2008 at 05:14 PM.
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