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Old 07-22-2008, 07:50 AM   #11
Allen Yeh
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I've found auto/truck tires to be a bit too squirrely for me with sledge work. I like semi tires, they stay pretty well.

Go to a tire place and ask them if they have any undesirables, like Patrick said. I got two nice semi tires that way.

Make sure to drill holes on all "three" sides of the tire, so that water can escape--unless you like creating mosquito havens.
Good call on the holes thing, that just saved me a whole bunch of bug repellant!

I know you said that semi tires allow for a longer swing? Is that because they don't move around as much? Sorry for the newbish question but in the past whenever I saw stuff about sledgehammer stuff I'd skim it but not really read it as I knew I wouldn't be able to implement any of it back in my old place.
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Old 07-22-2008, 08:58 AM   #12
Garrett Smith
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Semi tires are taller and not so wide. When they are laid on their side, they're lower, which means a longer high-to-low swing. This is as opposed to the really big/wide (wide means tall when laid on its side, hence the shorter swing) tires that most people use for flipping.

For your backyard situation, it sounds like a semi tire would be best (if you won't be flipping it).
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Old 07-22-2008, 09:28 AM   #13
Joel Barnett
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Instead of buying multiple sledge hammers, I have been using my 10#'er and slipping plates over the handle. They fit nicely and the rubber sleeve on the handle where the handle meets the metal keeps the plate in place during swinging (along with the centrifical force). You can have one 10# sledge and do 12.5, 15, 17.5# etc...options.

I agree...semi-tire is great for strikes and dragging. Les Schwab was pleased as punch to let me take one away. Now I just need a big one for flipping.
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Old 07-22-2008, 10:10 AM   #14
Jay Cohen
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Good call on the keg, how much does that run around?

With the price of metal going up, not sure. I think I paid about 10 bucks apiece, 1/4 and 1/2 keg.
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Old 07-22-2008, 11:20 AM   #15
Eva Claire Synkowski
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So what would you say is a good weight to start off with? 10 or 12#? I'm thinking 8 seems light but then again I've never done anything with a sledgehammer other than actual work.
because of the long lever arm - even lighter sledges seem "heavy". we've got an 8, 10 and just in, a 16# sledge. ive used the 16# in wods with 50 reps plus.... its heavy, but still able to crank through sets unbroken. youd be fine with it.
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Old 07-22-2008, 02:52 PM   #16
Dave Van Skike
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Good call on the keg, how much does that run around?

I got an old one for 20 bucks, keep in mind a 15 gallon keg is only #160 with water in it, you'll need to add sand or gravel to get it over #200.

The cheaper alternative is a HUGE sandbag, kegs are hard when they're heavy,over 150 pounds, sandbags seem hard all the time.

I've been having a bear of a tme finding a good tire, there are lots of little ones in the 400 pound range but not much over 500, which woudl probably be a good one for you to start with.
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Old 07-22-2008, 04:15 PM   #17
Jay Cohen
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The point on lifting Kegs is the instability of the water sloshing, not just dead weight.

Fill a keg with 5 gallons water(8.3lb per gallon), + weight of keg(?), lift over head and go for a walk, go up/down some grades, report back.

Partial filled keg is whole other animal from sandbag work
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Old 07-22-2008, 04:40 PM   #18
Dave Van Skike
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The point on lifting Kegs is the instability of the water sloshing, not just dead weight.

Fill a keg with 5 gallons water(8.3lb per gallon), + weight of keg(?), lift over head and go for a walk, go up/down some grades, report back.

Partial filled keg is whole other animal from sandbag work

walking about with a sloshing five gallons overhead is interesting but I can't think of a legit reason why I would do that unless it was part of some other drunken weirdness...which I try to avoid...

WRT to keg training, I enjoy keg work as a replacemenbt for/adjunct to heavy pulls sort of like a stone load or weight over the bar style (I started at hip height adn worked upwards to shoulder height). It's fabulous intro to round back lifting. I enjoy using the keg in lieu of a stone load or lighter as an overhead push press. Started doing it in prep for a strongman event and have to say it's really good conditioning/strength game in a density format....

Bryce Lane is a good resource for this stuff. There's also chap over at P and B, Strongmac that does a good bit of max clean and press keg and sandbag...swears by it and has pressed some goodly numbers overhead with both.
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Old 07-22-2008, 06:52 PM   #19
Jay Cohen
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Same reason people build a slosh pipe.
Works the whole body, but if it doesn't click for you, well, best not try it then.

I have two kegs and a slosh pipe, ever in the neighbor, stop in.
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Old 07-22-2008, 07:36 PM   #20
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Will do. I admit, I worship at the alter of load, rarely try the other stuff....
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