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Old 08-06-2008, 08:21 PM   #1
Matthew Woodley
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Default How to achieve a double body-weight squat and deadlift?

How would I go about achieving this?

I weigh 78.2 kgs. My current 1RM deadlift is 140kg and squat is 100kg. How often should I be practicing these two lifts and within what rep ranges and weights should I be using?

What other assistance exercises should I be doing as well?
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Old 08-06-2008, 10:16 PM   #2
Steven Low
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Do Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe and Lon Kilgore.

Yes, go buy the book. It's very, very, very good.
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Site // Bodyweight Strength Training Article // Overcoming Gravity Bodyweight Book
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Old 08-06-2008, 10:41 PM   #3
Matthew Woodley
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Do Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe and Lon Kilgore.

Yes, go buy the book. It's very, very, very good.
Thanks Steven for your quick reply, would I also have to consume a lot of calories to make strength gains, or is it possible to gain the strength without increasing my weight, I am wanting to have a good power/weight ratio, ideally I would like to squat 3 x body weight, is this possible?
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Old 08-06-2008, 10:59 PM   #4
Steven Low
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Thanks Steven for your quick reply, would I also have to consume a lot of calories to make strength gains, or is it possible to gain the strength without increasing my weight, I am wanting to have a good power/weight ratio, ideally I would like to squat 3 x body weight, is this possible?
You don't have to eat for mass gains... but strength will come quicker if you do.

And yes, you can work up to that (3x bw squat) but it will take years of hard work.
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Old 08-07-2008, 06:07 AM   #5
Leo Soubbotine
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Double bodyweight deadlift is a pretty easy feat to achieve. 6 months of crossfit with no extra strength training usually gets you there. I've seen that happen too many times by now.
Double bodyweight squat is a bit harder.

Triple bodyweight squat - as Steven said - will take quite some time.
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Old 08-07-2008, 09:12 AM   #6
Dave Van Skike
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Originally Posted by Matthew Woodley View Post
How would I go about achieving this?

I weigh 78.2 kgs. My current 1RM deadlift is 140kg and squat is 100kg. How often should I be practicing these two lifts and within what rep ranges and weights should I be using?

What other assistance exercises should I be doing as well?
Why limit yourself to 2xBW?

you don't need to gain much weight at all. Saw a 51 year old gentleman pull 668 on Saturday at 181 BW.

You'll learn a a lot from that book, you'll learn 50 times as much training with someone who is motivated and knows what they are doing.
hands down the most important thing is to find someone to train with who has similar goals and who has experience. rep ranges (less than 8 anyway) workout frequency etc. is overrated. Everything works, nothing works forever.
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Old 08-07-2008, 10:00 AM   #7
Jacob Rowell
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I'm pretty sure I've hit a 2.5BW DL (my weight varies considerably) and I just hit a 350 squat at 175#. I'm by no means a strong person, nor do I gain strength particularly easy.

I got my deadlift strength through CF and some MEBB action. I went through starting strength later, got my squat up to 305 (I was overtrained like a mofo, live and learn), got a little farther with MEBB, up to 335, and dug up a fairly simple periodized routine to get me to 350.

What you need to get you to your goals depends quite a bit on your individual strengths and weaknesses. Be persistent, start simple, and you'll get there.
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Old 08-07-2008, 12:02 PM   #8
joe waguespack
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Not to sound like a jerk (thats not my intention at all), but deadlift and squat. It's very easy to get caught up in the whole "what exercises will improve my_______". The answer is always _______.

I have one athlete that added 150lbs to his deadlift in a month while dropping 15 lbs of BW at the same time. I also had him deadlifting 2-3 times a week (like in Starting Strength). We used varied rep schemes, some days it was heavy weight and low reps, other days it was 135lbs for 50 reps. Some days it was AMRAP in 20 minutes of BW deads. I also should mention that he was not new to deadlifting, just new to the volume of deadlifting. The best way to improve or grow stronger at a particular movement is to do that movement. I myself jumped from 360lbs to 435lbs in a month at a bodyweight of 165. I was also deadlifting at the very least 2 times a week.

I know the Westside guys use the reverse hyper as a way to improve their deads ( and I sure will not argue with their results) but they are lifting at such massive poundages that constantly training with those weights becomes a risk factor.
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Old 08-08-2008, 01:17 AM   #9
James Evans
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthew Woodley View Post
How would I go about achieving this?

I weigh 78.2 kgs. My current 1RM deadlift is 140kg and squat is 100kg. How often should I be practicing these two lifts and within what rep ranges and weights should I be using?

What other assistance exercises should I be doing as well?
At those numbers would I be right in saying you are fairly new to regular, sensible strength training?

By explanation I mean structuctured, progressive sessions that run for weeks, months, years even. Not some squats here and some lunges there and arms day when you feel like it. I've trained for 15 years of my life at about 20% capacity and 3 years when I think I've almost understood it - not quite there yet.

If so, just deadlifting and squatting is going to help. Keep it simple. Keep putting weight on the bar.

The books rock by the way.
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Old 08-08-2008, 07:12 AM   #10
Paul McKirdy
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Everything you do trains deadlift. It is an entire kinetic chain movement. Just like pushing and pulling a heavy wheelbarrow. Just like squatting. Just like good mornings. Just like overhead presses. Just like power cleans. If your hands are grabbing something heavy and your feet are on the ground and you then proceed to move that weight through space, you are training the deadlift. They are all just different angles of attack and intensities to hit different weaknesses. The form breakdown in the deadlift is simply precisely telling you where your weakness is.

My recent PR came from two months of tons of pullups, sledding and chain loaded box squats followed by good mornings and reverse hypers. I am now cycled onto heavy wheelbarrow foot drills(i never would have believed how much stronger legs feel with strong feet under them), tons of pullups, reverse hyper and band loaded\chain loaded mixed box squats(switched from chuck taylors to O-Lifting shoes for a few weeks now for quad recruitment) + good mornings. Next week I will be starting on 10 mile bicycle rides at least twice a again as well.
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