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Old 03-24-2009, 06:33 AM   #1
Darryl Shaw
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Default Meat Intake and Mortality.

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Death link to too much red meat

Scientists have produced new evidence suggesting eating lots of red and processed meat damages health.

They found big meat eaters had a raised risk of death from all causes over a 10-year period.

In contrast, a higher intake of white meat was associated with a slightly reduced risk of death over the same period.

The US study, featured in Archives of Internal Medicine, was based on more than 500,000 people.

The researchers, from The US National Cancer Institute, found those whose diet contained the highest proportion of red or processed meat had a higher overall risk of death, and specifically a higher risk of cancer and heart disease than those who ate the least.

People eating the most meat were eating about 160g of red or processed meat per day - approximately a 6oz steak.

Those who ate the least were only getting about 25g per day - approximately a small rasher of bacon.

Conversely, those who ate the highest proportion of white meat had a lower risk of overall death, and a lower risk of fatal cancer or heart disease than those who ate the lowest proportion.

The researchers calculated that 11% of deaths in men and 16% of deaths in women during the study period could have been prevented if people had decreased their red meat consumption to the level of those in the lowest intake group.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7959128.stm

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ABSTRACT

Background High intakes of red or processed meat may increase the risk of mortality. Our objective was to determine the relations of red, white, and processed meat intakes to risk for total and cause-specific mortality.

Methods The study population included the National Institutes of Health–AARP (formerly known as the American Association of Retired Persons) Diet and Health Study cohort of half a million people aged 50 to 71 years at baseline. Meat intake was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression models estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) within quintiles of meat intake. The covariates included in the models were age, education, marital status, family history of cancer (yes/no) (cancer mortality only), race, body mass index, 31-level smoking history, physical activity, energy intake, alcohol intake, vitamin supplement use, fruit consumption, vegetable consumption, and menopausal hormone therapy among women. Main outcome measures included total mortality and deaths due to cancer, cardiovascular disease, injuries and sudden deaths, and all other causes.

Results There were 47 976 male deaths and 23 276 female deaths during 10 years of follow-up. Men and women in the highest vs lowest quintile of red (HR, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.27-1.35], and HR, 1.36 [95% CI, 1.30-1.43], respectively) and processed meat (HR, 1.16 [95% CI, 1.12-1.20], and HR, 1.25 [95% CI, 1.20-1.31], respectively) intakes had elevated risks for overall mortality. Regarding cause-specific mortality, men and women had elevated risks for cancer mortality for red (HR, 1.22 [95% CI, 1.16-1.29], and HR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.12-1.30], respectively) and processed meat (HR, 1.12 [95% CI, 1.06-1.19], and HR, 1.11 [95% CI 1.04-1.19], respectively) intakes. Furthermore, cardiovascular disease risk was elevated for men and women in the highest quintile of red (HR, 1.27 [95% CI, 1.20-1.35], and HR, 1.50 [95% CI, 1.37-1.65], respectively) and processed meat (HR, 1.09 [95% CI, 1.03-1.15], and HR, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.26-1.51], respectively) intakes. When comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of white meat intake, there was an inverse association for total mortality and cancer mortality, as well as all other deaths for both men and women.

Conclusion Red and processed meat intakes were associated with modest increases in total mortality, cancer mortality, and cardiovascular disease mortality.
http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/169/6/562
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Old 03-25-2009, 04:57 PM   #2
Brian Stone
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Michael Eades posted a good response to this in his blog. I'd have to really dig into the "meat" (Doh!) of the study to come to my own conclusions, but his thoughts are certainly interesting.

http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/f...ity/#more-2770
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Old 03-25-2009, 05:24 PM   #3
George Mounce
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Want something even more interesting? Compare Chicago murders to like....murders in D.C. Not to get political but there is a ton of killing going on in the U.S. but the media only ever reports people who are dying overseas for some reason. Dead is dead, isn't it?

The media pushes agendas. This meat agenda is just another thing big media deems necessary to push.

Eades hits it right on this one.
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Old 03-25-2009, 06:45 PM   #4
Liam Dougherty Springer
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My first reaction is another observed population study through questionnaires.... seriously... My second is I wonder about carbohydrate intake in the same population relative to death... Then I see that they included questions about fruits and veggies to help select the test pop this is new… but wait… yup nothing on refined carb consumption, I have read other studies which show the coincidence of refined carbohydrate and red meat consumption in similar groups... the general rule in America is when one goes up so does the other.

It would for all above reasons be my opinion a to give a big poo on these sorts of studies with wildly random variables and hardly overwhelming conclusions.

I am with you George Media hype. Beef its whats for dinner.
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Old 03-25-2009, 06:53 PM   #5
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The point of this post is that you shouldn’t get wound up about a study that gets reported throughout the media because there are more than likely other studies that are just as well done and just as important showing exactly the opposite findings that the press chooses to ignore. You’re not seeing the science as it is, you’re seeing the science as the press wants you to see it, which, typically, is the way that confirms the bias of members of the press.
Bingo.....I get sick of the anti-meat studies as it's something the press really wants to be true......yawnnnnnnnnn. Can we stop the vegan loving posts around here now?

Weston price said it best that the biggest factors in diseases are the high consumption of vegetable oils and refined carbohydrates.....which any study about Americans is sure to be full of.
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Old 03-26-2009, 12:12 AM   #6
Enrique Billington
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Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
Bingo.....I get sick of the anti-meat studies as it's something the press really wants to be true......yawnnnnnnnnn. Can we stop the vegan loving posts around here now?

Weston price said it best that the biggest factors in diseases are the high consumption of vegetable oils and refined carbohydrates.....which any study about Americans is sure to be full of.
Exactly.

Correlation does not equal causation.
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Old 03-26-2009, 06:56 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
Bingo.....I get sick of the anti-meat studies as it's something the press really wants to be true......yawnnnnnnnnn. Can we stop the vegan loving posts around here now?

Weston price said it best that the biggest factors in diseases are the high consumption of vegetable oils and refined carbohydrates.....which any study about Americans is sure to be full of.
Although I lean toward the typical lower carb more meat model of nutrition, I think that ant-meat studies are as important as their pro-meat counterparts. To assume that we have all the facts and know the full depth and breadth of what there is to know about nutrition is a little presumptuous.

I see what you're saying about being sick of the agenda, but I think that these studies warrant as much careful consideration as any other.

Not accusing you of this, but knee-jerk backlash to these types of studies is as unfortunate as an uninformed "I told ya so."
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Old 03-26-2009, 08:20 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Brian Stone View Post
Although I lean toward the typical lower carb more meat model of nutrition, I think that ant-meat studies are as important as their pro-meat counterparts. To assume that we have all the facts and know the full depth and breadth of what there is to know about nutrition is a little presumptuous.

I see what you're saying about being sick of the agenda, but I think that these studies warrant as much careful consideration as any other.

Not accusing you of this, but knee-jerk backlash to these types of studies is as unfortunate as an uninformed "I told ya so."
Just had my fill of "meat is evil" by the mass media nowadays...when most studies are poorly done and don't take into account all the other lifestyle and nutritional factors that are key to health and longevity. I guy eating Big Macs with fries and a coke is not the same as a guy eating a steak with veggies and water. Quality of meat matters, as does other food intake that could promote increased oxidation, free radicals and inflammation.

The media has an agenda it wants to prove right at all costs.....meat is evil and breakfast is king.....2 things I horridly believe against.
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Old 03-26-2009, 10:42 AM   #9
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MOD, maybe we should encourage them to keep it up. Ideally, it'll drive the cost of steak down for the rest of us.
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Old 03-26-2009, 01:53 PM   #10
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MOD, maybe we should encourage them to keep it up. Ideally, it'll drive the cost of steak down for the rest of us.
That's the only valid argument for vegetarianism I would support!
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