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Old 10-04-2008, 07:55 PM   #1
Patrick Donnelly
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Default Gastric Bypass Alternative

http://www.trueresults.com/faq.asp

So, basically, they put an adjustable rubber band around your gut to reduce the amount you can eat, rather than cutting off a large chunk of it. This makes it much more safe than gastric by-pass surgery. I'm not seeing any explicit pricing, but I assume it'd be cheaper too. I'm fairly certain that few people here would call this a good thing, as it just enforces bad eating habits and the "there's always an easy way out" mentality, but for those seriously contemplating gastric bypass, this seems to be a better alternative. The next step is to just get people to no longer need gastric bypass surgery!


On a side note, if I decide to move up to the 105kg weightlifting class (currently in the middle of the 94kg), I'll be "obese" by BMI standards, and qualify for the Lap-Band. Hah.
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Old 10-04-2008, 08:34 PM   #2
Steven Low
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Yep. Epic phailure.

We need more self control and personal responsibility in the U.S.
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Old 10-04-2008, 09:13 PM   #3
Derek Weaver
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Yup, Kaiser Permanente's been doing lap bands for a while.

It pisses me off.

My favorite Gastric Bypass Alternative is... eating less and moving more. Works wonders.
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Old 10-04-2008, 11:59 PM   #4
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super charming to judge from the sidelines and talk about self control. I dare anyone to spend a day with a patient who has a metabolic disorder or better yet a week with someone post lap band surgery. it's a brutal, brutal choice and incredibly ignorant to think any of the choices are an "easy way out".

Judge not, lest some fat kid beat the crap out of you.
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Old 10-05-2008, 12:38 AM   #5
Derek Weaver
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Good point Dave, though I did date a girl for a long while who was in the process of developing a very severe metabolic disorder and ended up requiring medical and psychiatric intervention, though it was anorexia... opposite end of the spectrum, just as nasty and unhealthy. And you're right, it's not fun, it's a brutal experience for all involved.

My personal problem, is that KP patients who are candidates for the Lap Band are monitored and "forced" to exhibit self control and weight loss of a certain percentage or number of pounds before they can be approved. Why not just push them the whole way to a "healthy" bodyweight?

There are those who have thyroid issues (my uncle is one of them), and other hormonal disorders over which they have zero control, and a Lap Band or Gastric Bypass is a good way of implementing rather severe caloric restriction to help aleviate the weight issue and improve the quality of life. I have zero problem in this case. Certainly a good thing.

For most others though, self control is all that's needed. It's not easy, but it is simple. The sad truth is that we enable in this country, and we have a whole generation of children likely to die before their parents as proof of it.

I'm not trying to be mean, I'm just sad at the state of what's happening with our population.
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Old 10-05-2008, 07:39 AM   #6
Chris Forbis
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60 Minutes did a piece on gastric bypass that was interesting.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/...n4023451.shtml

I found it especially interesting that removal of the duodenum makes diabetes (type II, I assume) go away, independent of body weight and stomach removal.
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Old 10-05-2008, 11:11 AM   #7
Dave Van Skike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Weaver View Post
Good point Dave, though I did date a girl for a long while who was in the process of developing a very severe metabolic disorder and ended up requiring medical and psychiatric intervention, though it was anorexia... opposite end of the spectrum, just as nasty and unhealthy. And you're right, it's not fun, it's a brutal experience for all involved.

My personal problem, is that KP patients who are candidates for the Lap Band are monitored and "forced" to exhibit self control and weight loss of a certain percentage or number of pounds before they can be approved. Why not just push them the whole way to a "healthy" bodyweight?

There are those who have thyroid issues (my uncle is one of them), and other hormonal disorders over which they have zero control, and a Lap Band or Gastric Bypass is a good way of implementing rather severe caloric restriction to help aleviate the weight issue and improve the quality of life. I have zero problem in this case. Certainly a good thing.

For most others though, self control is all that's needed. It's not easy, but it is simple. The sad truth is that we enable in this country, and we have a whole generation of children likely to die before their parents as proof of it.

I'm not trying to be mean, I'm just sad at the state of what's happening with our population.

Derek the anorexia tie in is very apt. Anorexia and morbid obesity are not simply metabolic nor purely psychological issues, they're both.

Both are severe addictions, and expecting anyone to suck it up and just quit is dismissive and ignorant...not than anyone here would do that, but there is a prevailing tone among members of any "fitness" arena to take an evangelical approach to these kind of issues.
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Old 10-05-2008, 11:57 AM   #8
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The number one thing people with any kind of problem need is help. While we may find help to be through changes in habit, unfortunately that may not always be the answer. I won't lie, I think its weak-willed to need something unnatural to change a habit (surgery to change one's stomach). Of course I'm one to talk (and you can all laugh at me) I'm extremely addicted to MMORPG video games. No lie, I'd go on 48-hour playing marathons, which is why I had to quit playing MMORPGs. They were taking over my life.

Funny thing is you don't find many anorexic people in nation's plagued by starvation. So to me its another byproduct (like my lame video game addiction) of something in our "modern" society, fueled by the need of many to feel socially accepted to an extreme.
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Old 10-05-2008, 05:20 PM   #9
Philip Stablein
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Quote:
Originally Posted by George Mounce View Post
Of course I'm one to talk (and you can all laugh at me) I'm extremely addicted to MMORPG video games. No lie, I'd go on 48-hour playing marathons, which is why I had to quit playing MMORPGs. They were taking over my life.
I won't laugh. I had a few hundred days down the drain before I quit. Fitness is a much better hobby, being self limiting, and having better results from intensity than from volume. Plus the persistent gains you get when working out have a value beyond pixels on a screen or numbers in a database.

But I think the issues of addiction, control, etc are very apt. I think that there will be a few cases of people who are CF addicted. Its got many of the same qualities of an MMORPG or of food: reward, repeatability, community, and having lots to master.

My fiancee wanted to make sure I wasn't repeating the same poor behavior patterns when I first started CFing and particularly with PLing and weight gain. She was worried, and rightly so, that I would simply never stop. Always chasing the next DL number or the next weight class. However, I made SURE when I started CF, that it would be sustainable, healthy, and that I would not spend massive amounts of time researching, reading, practicing. So far so good!

But no matter the arena addiction is hard to break. A relevant question: what proportion of lap band and surgery electees are truly clincally addicted to eating? Or is it simply just a pattern of convenience? I actually don't know enough about morbid obesity, and I oughto learn more, and find out how it differs from what I could term "casual obesity".

Although I admit my own limitations, it seems that Dave's point about the disorder being neither purely metabolic or purely psychological has some face validilty. I just spend Saturday at the Obesity Society (treatment not practice) annual conference, and there was very little about the psychology of food addiction. Mostly just chemical or clinical info sessions, abstracts etc. Lots of bio too. The one presentation I went to about "coaching weight loss" was nice, from the point of view that a lot of clinicians needs to be reminded that weight loss/health arent just about the number on the scale, or the drug regimen or the food log.

On a less serious note, I too will be moving up to the obese weight class this winter! 95 kilos here I come!

note: it seems my spellcheck has crapped out. Sorry
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Old 10-05-2008, 09:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Van Skike View Post
Derek the anorexia tie in is very apt. Anorexia and morbid obesity are not simply metabolic nor purely psychological issues, they're both.

Both are severe addictions, and expecting anyone to suck it up and just quit is dismissive and ignorant...not than anyone here would do that, but there is a prevailing tone among members of any "fitness" arena to take an evangelical approach to these kind of issues.
As usual Dave you make awesome points. Any addiction is a combination of physical and psychological factors, yet like Philip said, how many people who are morbidly obese have the genetic factor working against them as well?

Many may, but I have a hard time believing that the majority do in fact suffer from addiction. Like I said in my original response, Lap Band candidates for KP are required to go on low carbohydrate, low calorie diets and do periodic check ins for weight loss. Why has nobody stopped and gone "Wait a second, we can all lose the weight without surgery... yet we're still going to have it?" I don't get it.

Don't get me wrong, I don't think it's easy, I think it is a very difficult decision to make. However, I think we live in a society that "thrives" on instant (or near instant) gratification. Lap Bands and Gastric Bypasses offer quicker results than reading literature, signing up for a gym (or not, gyms aren't entirely necessary), and if needed joining a support structure (Weight Watchers). All of that is likely cheaper as well.
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