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Old 10-07-2008, 11:17 AM   #21
George Mounce
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Not side effects. People who get this done have no control over their eating habits - they still eat the shit that got them there. Its a quick fix.

It manages the diabetes, it doesn't cure it. It changes how your body manages it's chemistry, how it digests foods...etc. Its not natural.

Off the top of my mother's head, it also increases calcium and potassium loss. From one patient she has worked with who had the procedure, the patient experienced the standard weight loss because of the smaller meal intake (which at first is all liquid meals), which can lead to vomiting and rip the sutures. Biggest problem this person had was a huge drop in potassium levels and ended up back in the hospital with cardiac issues due to potassium loss.

With the weight loss, my mother explains that not all the insurance companies will cover the removal of excess skin, which can cause some mental anguish.

Ok, my mom just gave me her log on to MedScape Nurses (free to join), here is some abstract info:

Quote:
The Long-term Effects of Gastric Bypass on Vitamin D Metabolism

Posted 05/11/2006

Jason M. Johnson, DO; James W. Maher, MD; Eric J. DeMaria, MD; Robert W. Downs, MD; Luke G. Wolfe, BS; John M. Kellum, MD

Abstract

Objective: Alterations of the endocrine system in patients following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) are poorly described and have prompted us to perform a longitudinal study of the effects of GBP on serum calcium, 25-hydroxy-vitamin-D (vitamin D), and parathyroid hormone (PTH).
Methods: Prospectively collected data were compiled to determine how GBP affects serum calcium, vitamin D, and PTH. Student t test, Fisher exact test, or linear regression was used to determine significance.
Results: Calcium, vitamin D, and PTH levels were drawn on 243 patients following GBP. Forty-one patients had long-limb bypass (LL-GBP), Roux >100 cm, and 202 had short-limb bypass (SL-GBP), Roux ≤100 cm. The mean (±SD) postoperative follow-up time was significantly longer in the LL-GBP group (5.7 ± 2.5 years) than the SL-GBP group (3.1 ± 3.6 years, P < 0.0001). When corrected for albumin levels, mean calcium was 9.3 mg/dL (range, 8.5–10.8 mg/dL), and no difference existed between LL-GBP and SL-GBP patients. For patients with low vitamin D levels (<8.9 ng/mL), 88.9% had elevated PTH (>65 pg/mL) and 58.0% of patients with normal vitamin D levels (≥8.9 ng/mL) had elevated PTH (P < 0.0001). In individuals with vitamin D levels <30 ng/mL, 55.1% (n = 103) had elevated PTH, and of those with vitamin D levels ≥30 ng/mL 28.5% (n = 16) had elevated PTH (P = 0.0007). Mean vitamin D levels were lower in patients who had undergone LL-GBP as opposed to those with SL-GBP, 16.8 ± 10.8 ng/mL versus 22.7 ± 11.1 ng/mL (P = 0.0022), and PTH was significantly higher in patients who had a LL-GBP (113.5 ± 88.0 pg/mL versus 74.5 ± 52.7 pg/mL, P = 0.0002). There was a linear decrease in vitamin D (P = 0.005) coupled with a linear increase in PTH (P < 0.0001) the longer patients were followed after GBP. Alkaline phosphatase levels were elevated in 40.3% of patients and correlated with PTH levels.
Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency and elevated PTH are common following GBP and progress over time. There is a significant incidence of secondary hyperparathyroidism in short-limb GBP patients, even those with vitamin D levels ≥30 ng/mL, suggesting selective Ca2+ malabsorption. Thus, calcium malabsorption is inherent to gastric bypass. Careful calcium and vitamin D supplementation and long-term screening are necessary to prevent deficiencies and the sequelae of secondary hyperparathyroidism.

Introduction

The prevalence of obesity [body mass index (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2)]≥ doubled between 1976 and 1999 in the United States.[1] A record number of morbidly obese patients are seeking surgery in an attempt to decrease their weight and ultimately prevent or decrease comorbid conditions associated with their obesity. A number of different weight reduction operations are performed throughout the world, but Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) is the leading weight reduction operation offered in the United States. It has been well documented that GBP provides long-term weight reduction with prevention or resolution of comorbid conditions,[2-4] but the endocrine side effects of GBP remain incompletely studied.

Until recently, our bariatric surgery protocol included annual screening of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and albumin after GBP. With newer literature,[5] suggesting that patients who undergo GBP are at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency, our screening was updated to include both 25-hydroxyvitamin D (vitamin D) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. This is a longitudinal study of prospectively collected data that evaluates the endocrine effects of GBP on vitamin D, calcium and PTH levels.
If you want more, let me know, I now have access to thousands of pages of this stuff.
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Old 10-07-2008, 12:24 PM   #22
Garrett Smith
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Most of the time, surgical manipulation of the GI system results in malnutrition, unless specifically addressed through food choices and most often, supplementation.

First thing we are taught in naturopathic medical school is that "when in doubt, treat the gut". These folks will always be behind the 8-ball in that respect (as in, they are missing parts that G-d intended to be there, so things likely won't work right ever again).
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