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Old 10-09-2008, 03:29 PM   #1
Donald Lee
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Default Importance of Shoulder Prehab?

A month ago, I sprained my L5-S1 from squatting and soon discovered that I had horrible hamstring flexibility. Since then, I've become somewhat obsessive about reading up on mobility, flexibility, prehab, and all that good stuff. Since I can't squat, deadlift, or do olympic lifts for a while, I have a lot more time to do other stuff.

I just recently read up on Eric Cressey's 3 Shoulder Saver articles and his rotator cuff article on T-Nation. I've had shoulder flexibility problems, but never had any shoulder pain. Anyways, I never knew about all the importance of balancing humeral external rotation with internal rotation, scapular depression and elevation, scapular repression and protraction.

For the upper body, all I usu. do are vertical pushing and vertical pulling movements (and dips for which I don't know the categorization). Basically, I'm wondering whether I should worry about all the stuff Eric Cressey writes about b/c I've never had shoulder pain in the past. I do a lot of shoulder mobility work and am going to add stuff I've read in Super Joints. To increase shoulder flexibility, I do a lot of shoulder dislocates and do kip swings.

From the CrossFit community, I've always heard that to have healthy shoulders, just have a lot of shoulder mobility and press stuff overhead. According to Cressey's chart on Shoulder Saver: Part 1, I do scapular protraction, scapular elevation, and humeral internal rotation exercises, but I don't do any exercises on the other side of the chart.

These trips to the doctor and chiropractor are wearing on me.
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Old 10-09-2008, 04:11 PM   #2
George Mounce
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I do a ton of shoulder prehab (dynamic flexibility drills, shoulder dislocates) before I do my Oly lifts. I only see them as beneficial. Last thing I want is a hurt rotator cuff.
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Old 10-09-2008, 04:12 PM   #3
Scott Kustes
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Do it. Do it lots. The last thing you want is effed up shoulders. This comes from one with an effed up shoulder.
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Old 10-09-2008, 04:52 PM   #4
Donald Lee
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I'm always going to do a lot of mobility and flexibility work, but do I really need to worry about all the humeral rotation and scapular stuff? I know doing face pulls and rear delt flyes are important for people who bench a lot, but I rarely bench anymore.

I'm thinking about doing tension band stuff when my bands come in. In case you don't know what I'm talking about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlsXy... 31852&index=4

Date Tate also has an article on it on T-Nation, but I think the YouTube playlist with Dick Hartzell is a lot better.
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Old 10-09-2008, 05:42 PM   #5
Garrett Smith
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If your question is if shoulder prehab is important and a good idea to do before one has a problem, then I would answer yes to both.

Doing both arboreal (as in, pull-ups, rope climbing, and ring work) and terrestrial (ground-based pressing, yoga, handstands) based exercises will keep your shoulders in pretty good shape in all directions.

Remember, that in prehab ideas the general consensus is that the scapula generally needs stability in its various positions--I find that the isometric holds in both gymnastics and yoga really cover these well. Most of the time when people are talking about shoulder problems, they are unknowingly often talking about scapular issues.
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Old 10-09-2008, 06:30 PM   #6
Steven Low
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Better safe than sorry.

For scap retraction/depression/whatever you can use front lever work (specifically the progression pullups if you wanted). That's the one I like the most.. and front lever is a good goal anyway.
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Old 10-09-2008, 06:41 PM   #7
Donald Lee
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Yeah, I've been working on front lever progressions. I'm also thinking of doing more stability training. I've been too lazy to do ring dips and ring pushups, but I think those'll be good to do every once in a while. I'm also going to add in some unilateral work for the legs and upper body. I guess getting injured can be a good thing.
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Old 10-10-2008, 05:13 PM   #8
Garrett Smith
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Donald,
You could also work on ring supports and planche progressions (on p-lettes or rings) for the shoulder isometrics in those two directions.
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Old 10-10-2008, 06:07 PM   #9
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I have been having trouble with my freestanding handstand, so I was going to start training the frogstand next week. Are there any benefits to doing them on the paralletes, besides wrist comfort?
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:10 PM   #10
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They're different in terms of stablization. Work both (if you can).
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