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Old 12-04-2008, 10:32 AM   #21
Garrett Smith
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Grissim,
I only meant to imply that I didn't enjoy chemistry that much--my choices were either to take 1 or 2 extra chem classes for the chem minor or to do some more nutrition classes for a split nutrition/chemistry minor.

After organic chem, which kicked my butt, I definitely did not want to pursue that any further. Chem is legit, IMO, it's actually downright criminal how much modern medicine ignores basic biochemistry when it comes to human health.
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Old 12-04-2008, 11:30 AM   #22
Greg Battaglia
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Thanks for the good advice. In the long run the degree will help me (I think, at least). My goal is to open a CF affiliate with my buddy Bryan since we just got certified in August. I'm sure the RD credentials will be useful as a marketing tool.

Gittit,
I hear that. Freud was a brilliant neurologist, but he's an amateur philosopher. Viktor Frankl's Logotherapy is the good stuff IMHO.
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Old 12-07-2008, 04:41 PM   #23
Mike Prevost
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Thanks for the good advice. In the long run the degree will help me (I think, at least). My goal is to open a CF affiliate with my buddy Bryan since we just got certified in August. I'm sure the RD credentials will be useful as a marketing tool.

Gittit,
I hear that. Freud was a brilliant neurologist, but he's an amateur philosopher. Viktor Frankl's Logotherapy is the good stuff IMHO.
Greg

I spent 10 years in college (well, more like 12 since I am about to finish an MBA) and finished up with a PhD in exercise physiology. Professors do not know it all, that is for sure. Many are open minded enough to consider that they might not know everything, some are not. In the end, I found the classroom to be a good place to stimulate my interests and introduce some basics, but most of my learning came on my own, in the library. I learned much more by researching further what was discussed in class, than I did in the class itself. Use the basic knowledge you are getting in class as a springboard to build more knowledge. Spend some time in the library and learn as much as you can. If you find a professor is not receptive to information that counters what they are teaching, don't even waste your time. Been there...done that.

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Old 12-07-2008, 05:10 PM   #24
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Greg

I spent 10 years in college (well, more like 12 since I am about to finish an MBA) and finished up with a PhD in exercise physiology. Professors do not know it all, that is for sure. Many are open minded enough to consider that they might not know everything, some are not. In the end, I found the classroom to be a good place to stimulate my interests and introduce some basics, but most of my learning came on my own, in the library. I learned much more by researching further what was discussed in class, than I did in the class itself. Use the basic knowledge you are getting in class as a springboard to build more knowledge. Spend some time in the library and learn as much as you can. If you find a professor is not receptive to information that counters what they are teaching, don't even waste your time. Been there...done that.

Mike
Great advice Mike -- almost inspires me to go back to school for a Ph. D :P
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Old 12-08-2008, 02:40 PM   #25
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Great advice Mike -- almost inspires me to go back to school for a Ph. D :P
I am done with school! When I finish this MBA, no more school for me.....at least until I retire in 7 years ; )

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Old 12-08-2008, 05:37 PM   #26
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didn't read all the posts so I hope this isn't redundant... if you want to make a change... join the system... move up in the system... then change the system from the top.
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Old 12-08-2008, 06:10 PM   #27
Nikki Young
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didn't read all the posts so I hope this isn't redundant... if you want to make a change... join the system... move up in the system... then change the system from the top.
You did miss a bit
Greg isn't intending to change the system, he's just frustrated with it.

I'm kinda in a similar position, although I'm not studying nutrition i still have teachers who are just dumb, to say it nicely. Comments like "most people create presentation slides using Microsoft word, not powerpoint" and assistance like the following when asking a question 'i can't seem to save my project to the right file type, can you help me?' reply "just make sure you're doing it right". And when having a slight browser compatibility problem "that can't be fixed, it's just browsers, there's nothing you can do about it", which i later figured out how to fix

It's definitely frustrating but the piece of paper at the end of the day will defiantly mean a lot. I think you're at a HUGE advantage already though because you know so much about nutrition and a lot of the time most of the stuff you probably will learn will be learnt outside of school in further reading, especially in regards to nutrition. It's similar to a couple of books i have read, including the Ultra Prevention Diet, how doctors who after years of teaching medicine realise that they haven't been treating the problem of why people are sick, but just masking the symptoms so they change there approach to treating people. They would have learnt probably everything opposite to what they already know and learnt at medical school through their own reading and research which is exactly what you're doing.
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Old 12-09-2008, 12:13 PM   #28
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Nikki,
I hear ya, it's tough dealing with ignorance like that. Once people are in a position of authority the input of the people "below" them isn't even considered. It's just kiddy stuff to them. Anyway, hope you're doing well with school. Tough it out, it'll be worth it.
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Old 12-10-2008, 04:42 AM   #29
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Things like that always remind me of "Atlas Shrugged" and "Fountainhead"
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Old 12-25-2008, 08:43 AM   #30
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Ok, so this year was my first semester as a Dietetics major in college. So far, I've realized that dietitians generally know absolutely nothing about healthy eating. Zilch. Which brings me to the point of this post.

Yesterday in my nutrition class we were having a class discussion on the health benefits of whole grains (big surprise, right?) and the professor said the following (try not to laugh or cry too hard):

"The reason we recommend that people get half of their grains in whole form is because refined grains and white bread are actually more healthy than whole grains in some situations. Since refined flour is enriched with folic acid it's an excellent choice for pregnant women, since the whole varieties are lower in folic acid" She then went on to say "Whole grains are great because they are the richest food source of dietary fiber in our diets. They contain phytic acid, which prevents the body from digesting certain minerals in the grains, but this effect is minimal since we know that whole grains are the healthiest foods."

I was literally dumbfounded when she made this statement. I honestly felt sick because of her blatant stupidity. The sad thing is that the other students thought that this was great stuff. One girl was like "Wow, I didn't know white bread was that healthy". I've questioned this particular professor and other professors numerous times on their ridiculous claims and every time they give me the "I'm the professional, so I'm always right" mentality.

They are completely closed minded and any time I present them with the scientific research that clearly proves their claims wrong they say "That's interesting, but we need more studies on that". When I show them more studies they say, "Well, I think if that were a significant issue the ADA would have adjusted the recommendations by now".

One time the teacher actually said that low carbohydrate diets CAUSE insulin resistance. I immediately asked her in front of the class to provide even one scientific study that supported that claim. She had none, she said it was just "common knowledge". I then went on to explain that the vast majority of research shows quite the opposite and I would be willing to present an analysis and interpretation of those studies to the class. Of course she then changed the subject and said "It seems you've found what works for you, but for most people the food pyramid is the healthiest option."

I really don't know how to handle this idiotic behavior, what can I do here? These people are either 1) incredibly stupid 2) brain washed, or 3) being paid by someone to lie (which I doubt is the case).

I feel like I'm wasting time and money of this education (if that's what you'd even call it). It's very frustrating.
Mainstream scientists often seem to support grain diets, often biased by their own preferences. She totally missed comparing grains with non-grains.
That was her biggest mistake.

Personally I love the taste of grains, I just hate what it does to me.

Low carb diets effect on insulin is tricky business. Yes, low carb diets lower insulin levels and blood glucose. But saturated fat will lower insulin sensitivity, making many low carbers vulnerable if they ever load carbs.
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