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Old 01-14-2009, 07:01 PM   #11
Mike ODonnell
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This is an interesting page http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.asp

....basically says Vit D deficiency is because of:
- lack of sun (UVB) exposure
- overuse of sunscreen (see above for UVB exposure)
- diets low in fat (malabsorption of Vit D)
- screwed up guts (malabsorption of Vit D)
- excess subcutaneous fat (obesity) that traps Vit D (lowering circulating levels)

that and I'm sure diets low in High Vit D foods too. Still comes full circle...eat right, stay fit, get outside and play and the body rewards itself. Man was not meant to live long and prosper in an office cubicle based world.
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Old 01-16-2009, 06:16 PM   #12
Tony Ferous
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I agree, vitamin D seems to be flavor of the month currently, perhaps no bad thing to relook at it though.
How much D does my Tuna canned in olive oil really contain though??

This is about the best link i could find, likely biased though, i'll chow down some more wild salmon.

http://newsletter.vitalchoice.com/e_....cfm?x=b11,0,w
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Old 01-16-2009, 08:31 PM   #13
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Research seems to show that certain levels of Vitamin D are associated with lower risks of many common chronic diseases of the day.

There's a simple blood test to find out one's Vitamin D level.

Vitamin D is free, or at worst dirt cheap. I'm looking at some D3 drops that are 1000iu per drop, 1500 drops per bottle, selling for somewhere in the $20-30s range. A 5000iu/day dose would have this bottle lasting 10 months. Not exactly a huge profit-maker but maybe a huge health booster.

It would seem unwise to ignore this potentially big boost to longevity practices.

I've seen impressive things happen with patients' health in a short time by supplementing "sun-phobes" in my practice. FWIW. I saw a woman's BP drop by 20 points after 2 days of some mildly aggressive D supplementation.

Most snake oils are expensive with little research. Vitamin D is cheap and has a ton of research. Doesn't seem to fit the mold.
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Old 01-17-2009, 06:10 AM   #14
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perhaps the popularity of cod liver oil came along because of it's high Vit D along with the anti-inflammatory EPA/DHA

Quote:
Cod liver oil was first used as a therapeutic agent in the 1770's, and by the mid-1800's it was well-recognized as a cure for the childhood bone disease, rickets, which is marked by an expansion of the bone's metaphyseal plate and a buildup of unmineralized bone matrix, and its adult equivalent, osteomalacia. Upon the discovery of vitamin A in 1913 as a component of cod liver oil and butterfat, researchers assumed vitamin A to be responsible for cod liver oil's ability to cure rickets. In 1921, however, a team of researchers established that there was a separate component of cod liver oil responsible for its ability to cure rickets, which came to be known as vitamin D
and looks like our mainstream paranoia of cholesterol isn't helping...shocker
Quote:
Since cholesterol is a precursor to vitamin D, inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol will also inhibit the synthesis of vitamin D. Since sunlight is required to turn cholesterol into vitamin D, avoiding the sun will likewise undermine our ability to synthesize vitamin D. And since vitamin D-rich foods are also rich in cholesterol, low-cholesterol diets are inherently deficient in vitamin D.
also looks to be a balance of A & D that is essential for health
Quote:
Vitamin D increases the need for vitamin A in chickens even in small amounts that are insufficient to guarantee freedom from rickets. One study showed that massive doses of vitamin A alone caused bone and growth problems in turkeys, while massive doses of vitamin D alone caused kidney problems -- yet when these doses were combined, the turkeys exhibited no signs of toxicity at all.
all from this page: http://www.cholesterol-and-health.com/Vitamin-D.html
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Old 01-17-2009, 07:43 AM   #15
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There are theories out there (no research yet that I've come across) that high cholesterol levels could be indicative of a Vitamin D deficiency.

Low vitamin D = liver makes more cholesterol in the hopes of some sun exposure resulting in maximum vitamin D production.

Blog exploring vit. D and cholesterol, with some comments mentioning D supplementation and athletic performance: http://moblogs.wordpress.com/2007/08...-significance/

Study in Tehran: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum
Quote:
Mean values of serum lipids in different seasons were compared with Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) after adjustment for age, physical activity level, smoking, BMI and Waist-to-hip ratio. In men, there was a significant trend for change in the values of cholesterol, LDL-C and HDL-C in different seasons, with higher cholesterol and LDL-C values in winter than in summer (P < 0.05). In women, only the mean values of triglycerides were significantly different between different seasons with values lower in winter than in summer. There was a 26.2% relative increase in the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (> or = 240 mg/dl) in winter than in summer in men. The corresponding increase in the prevalence of high LDL-C (> or = 160 mg/dl) was 26.7% and 24.9% in men and women, respectively (P < 0.05). The prevalence of high triglycerides (> or = _ 200mg/dl) in women significantly decreased (23.8%) in winter relative to summer (P < 0.001). This study showed that there is seasonal variability in serum lipid values and this variability is greater in men than women. The increase in the prevalence of high LDL in winter in both sexes must be considered in population screening and in the follow-up of hyperlipidemic patients.
Someone please correct me if I'm wrong here--in Tehran (Iran), I am theorizing the the "lack" of difference in seasonal cholesterol levels in women as compared to the men could possibly be explained by the year-round wearing of head-to-toe clothing by women in the Muslim tradition?

Vitamin D levels have already been correlated with risks of diabetes and hypertension. Considering that hyperlipidemia is usually part of that little triad, it's not a bad thing to look into IMO.
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Old 01-22-2009, 01:48 PM   #16
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bottle of TJ VitD3 (cholecalciferol) was 3.99 or 2.99. Something ridiculously cheap. 180 caps would be 3 months at 2 caps a day (1k i.u.).

for 3 bucks a month, it's worth a shot to see what it can help with, especially as it's winter-ish in CA and I'm inside way too often.
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Old 01-22-2009, 04:19 PM   #17
Garrett Smith
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Blair,
If you're going to try it, you might want to go with at least 2000iu/day.

Article on Vitamin D toxicity: http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/vitaminDToxicity.shtml

I'm currently on 5000iu/day, as I don't get outside during the midday hours. What can I say has happened? I feel like I'm waking much more refreshed from my sleep, I'm able to fall asleep more easily after waking in the early morning hours (I've always had trouble with that), and I've unintentionally dropped ~4 pounds of BW (I can tell I've gotten leaner in the mirror) and I'm still progressing as planned on my gymnastics and OL workouts even with the lowered BW--not a surprise on the gymnastics, but a surprise on the OL.

I'm looking forward to testing my cholesterol in several months to see if changes happen there as well.
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Old 01-22-2009, 11:42 PM   #18
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losing bodyfat? awesome.

i was doing 2,000 i.u. earlier this week and i started 4,000 i.u. last night. i generally do 1-2 caps while drinking my milk and downing my fish oil and calmagzinc. this is done generally when i wake up, get home from work and before bed. i was going to do a week at 2k i.u. but i might as well bump it to 4.

i'm no longer bike riding to work and about( because i got a car and it's probably a good thing ) and i haven't gone swimming in a few months because of the weather or schedule. i can probably deal with the cold river, but i need to get some of those water booties things so i don't slip and fall on my head or get poked by things on my soles.

i haven't been a complete hermit but i haven't been running on the track in awhile either on weekends.
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Old 02-03-2009, 11:30 AM   #19
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I got this from OPT's newsletter:

Quote:
It is commonly thought that the principal function of vitamin D is to promote calcium absorption in the gut and calcium transfer across cell membrains, thus contributing to strong bones and a calm, contented nervous system. Actually, vitamin D does not in itself promote healthy bone. Vitamin D controls the levels of calcium in the blood. If there is not enough calcium in the diet, then it will be drawn from the bone. High levels of vitamin D (from the diet or from sunlight) will actually demineralize bone if sufficient calcium is not present so you shouldn't just take a D supplement alone without supplementing with other important minerals. For those of you in the crowd worried about your body composition, vitamin D deficiency decreases biosynthesis and release of insulin...thus promoting glucose intolerance, and thus affecting your body composition test scores.
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Old 02-03-2009, 01:01 PM   #20
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Um, if there is not enough calcium in the diet, the body is always going to get it from the bone. That's a foregone conclusion.

Vitamin D increases uptake of calcium from the intestines.

If someone has a calcium-deficient diet to begin with, then compounds the issue with a vitamin D deficiency, they're really in a pickle because they won't be absorbing much of the calcium that they do take in!

A review from "Drugs and Aging" journal (I find this ironic):
Optimal vitamin D status for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
Quote:
Vitamin D(3) (cholecalciferol) sufficiency is essential for maximising bone health. Vitamin D enhances intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus. The major source of vitamin D for both children and adults is exposure of the skin to sunlight. Season, latitude, skin pigmentation, sunscreen use, clothing and aging can dramatically influence the synthesis of vitamin D in the skin. Very few foods naturally contain vitamin D or are fortified with vitamin D. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D; calcifediol] is the best measure of vitamin D status. Vitamin D deficiency [as defined by a serum 25(OH)D level of <50 nmol/L (<20 ng/mL)] is pandemic. This deficiency is very prevalent in osteoporotic patients. Vitamin D deficiency causes osteopenia, osteoporosis and osteomalacia, increasing the risk of fracture. Unlike osteoporosis, which is a painless disease, osteomalacia causes aching bone pain that is often misdiagnosed as fibromyalgia or chronic pain syndrome or is simply dismissed as depression. Vitamin D deficiency causes muscle weakness, increasing the risk of falls and fractures, and should be aggressively treated with pharmacological doses of vitamin D. Vitamin D sufficiency can be sustained by sensible sun exposure or ingesting at least 800-1000 IU of vitamin D(3) daily. Patients being treated for osteoporosis should be adequately supplemented with calcium and vitamin D to maximise the benefit of treatment.
Obviously, we need calcium and we need vitamin D. Duh, right? The comment about D without adequate calcium causing bone calcium to be leached seems unnecessary IMO. I haven't heard about the rash of studies showing people were becoming osteoporotic from taking too much vitamin D and not getting enough calcium--it seems to be the exact opposite.

Note that the above article is from a very conventional journal and is not discussing calcium, but only vitamin D, and using the word "pandemic" at that.

I could then add that too much calcium without enough magnesium causes all sorts of problems, and too much of this without enough of that causes these problems, ad nauseum. It just becomes counterproductive for the layperson. Could it be theorized that many of the "calcium deficient" folks became that way over a long period of being vitamin D deficient (and hence not absorbing it from their diets)?

The simple thing is that calcium can be obtained from diet and/or supplements rather easily, but the gatekeeper is vitamin D. Vitamin D levels can be tested and "optimized" according to what appears to be pretty reliable data. The fear-inducing statements about vitamin D just don't have to appear in every single article--all they have to say is *get D3 tested* and get your calcium.
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