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Old 02-14-2009, 05:52 AM   #1
Darryl Shaw
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Default Natural Eating by Geoff Bond.

Natural Eating by Geoff Bond, author of my favourite paleo diet book Deadly Harvest, is now available to read free online -

http://www.naturaleater.com/Natural-...-Web-Index.htm
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Old 02-14-2009, 06:44 AM   #2
George Mounce
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I don't buy this:

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The human species is designed to get a good percentage of protein from vegetation. You have to eat lots, up to 3 pounds net per day (measure it out to start with).That is the way that our bodies are designed.
Not a great thing to tell people who already have a sugar problem based on who is supposed to read this book:

Quote:
Fruit

Their consumption should be increased to a minimum of 25% of the diet. Again, eat lots. Up to 2 pounds per day. Concentrate on the unrestricted fruits in Table 1 of Appendix 1, Good Foods to be Eaten in Bulk.
It doesn't talk about why this occurs enough (i.e. sugar release which causes insulin to be release, which btw isn't necessarily a bad thing):

Quote:
Caffeine

Caffeine provokes the secretion of insulin. Prefer decaffeinated drinks wherever possible.
Heh, I am an avid hunter and my freezer is full of game meat, I don't buy this:

Quote:
The problem for meat eaters today is that there is nothing available resembling the animal matter for which we are genetically programmed.
It is out there, you have to actually go get it rather than relying on meat producers.

All in all, I think the book is a good read and I really just focused on one chapter here. It has somethings that are kind of iffy in my mind, but the general jist is sound and matches what other people have said about eating.
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Old 02-16-2009, 06:20 AM   #3
Darryl Shaw
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George,

Studies on human coprolites show that paleolithic hunter-gatherers ate ~130g of fibre per day so eating 3 - 5 pounds of fruit and vegetables per day doesn't seem all that unreasonable considering we evolved from mostly herbivorous/frugivorous primates.

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In Australia , Aborigines are known to have eaten some 300 different species of fruit, 150 varieties of roots and tubers, and a dizzying number of nuts, seeds, and vegetables (Brand-Miller and Holt 1998). Based on the analysis of over 800 of these plant foods, the fibre intake was estimated between 80 to 130 g/d, depending on the contribution of plants to daily energy needs (Brand-Miller and Holt 1998). This daily intake is most likely higher when you consider that fibre in the form of resistant starch and oligosaccharides were not measured by the researchers among the economically important roots and tubers.

In the semi-arid Trans-Pecos region of west Texas , a nearly continuous 10,000-year record of a foraging lifestyle has been documented in dry cave deposits. Considered one of the most complete records of foraging lifestyle in North America, nearly three decades of excavation and extensive analysis of well-preserved macrobotanical remains and human coprolites (feces) from a number of cave sites (Sobolik 1994) reveal a plant-based diet that conservatively providing between 150 to 250 g/d of dietary fibre from dozens of plant species. The fiber-rich diet is well-illustrated by the visual presence (Figure 1) of undigested fiber (cellulose) in nearly 100% of the human coprolites studied throughout the entire 10,000-year sequence (Sobolik 1994).
http://www.paleobioticslab.com/evolu...ctalcancer.htm

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Dr. Poinar turned to the most intriguing field of ancient DNA, human remains. He analyzed several 2,000-year-old coprolites from Hinds Cave in southwest Texas.

."It's one of the biggest crap deposits known," says Vaughn Bryant, an anthropologist at Texas A&M University who led the excavation of the Hinds Cave deposit in the mid-1970s and provided Dr. Poinar with the samples.

The cave, an enormous, very dry, cliff-face rock shelter, housed generations of hunter-gatherers for 9,000 years. The site has yielded more than 2,000 cow-patty-shaped human coprolites.

The shape of these coprolites is due to the "astronomical" amounts of fibre in them, Dr. Bryant says. He estimates that the Hinds Cave inhabitants ate 15 times the daily fibre intake of present-day North Americans, mostly in the form of roasted desert plants, including agave and yucca.

Using mitochondrial DNA analysis, Dr. Poinar showed that three coprolites belonged to separate individuals. And he confirmed Dr. Bryant's microscopic analysis of the contents: These paleo-peoples were eating well.

Through genetic reconstruction, he showed that in the 24 to 48 hours before relieving himself at the back of the shelter, one Hinds Cave resident had eaten a veritable Thanksgiving feast. The coprolite included evidence of pronghorn antelope, cottontail rabbit, packrat, squirrel and eight types of wild plants.
http://www.mcmaster.ca/research/scie...cle_poinar.htm
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Old 02-16-2009, 08:16 AM   #4
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So why then are veggie proteins considered second class if it is our primary source?

I've seen this debated a lot by vegetarians, and I don't buy it. 1 steak versus 46 apples. I will take the steak every day.

I can show you studies of Eskimos who only eat meat and are healthy as all get out. I'm not going to buy the fact people absolutely need fiber.

People back then ate what was around them, and they ate to survive. You take those people and move them to a different place their eating habits would change as well.
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Old 02-17-2009, 06:03 AM   #5
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George,

Those "cow-patty-shaped" coprolites do not lie; paleolithic hunter-gatherers ate enormous volumes of plant foods daily in addition to the animal source foods they were eating. In other words paleo-man would have eaten the steak and the 46 apples.

As for the inuits, well first off they're the most modern of all hunter-gatherer groups so their diet is in no way representative of any kind of stone-age diet. Secondly it is simply wrong to say they "only eat meat". Clearly they don't eat anywhere near the volume of plant foods enjoyed by hunter-gatherers in more temperate climes but they do eat a wide variety of plant foods and harvest and store many of them to see them through the winter.

Edible Plants of The Arctic. by A. E. Porsild.
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Old 02-17-2009, 03:52 PM   #6
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What may be really hard to understand and comprehend for some of us who are die hard dieters is that....

People have survived thousands of years on probably millions of different diets/combinations of food. Not only this, many of them thrived and were considered very healthy.

The human body is very complex and very resilent. It will repair itself, fight off diseases, cue you in on what you need, and what you dont, among many other things. You hear of stories of people surviving with no food or water for 30 days, or people being stranded on an island living off coconuts and fish.

Watch Survivor Man and see the very different food choices he finds in each enviornment as simpile proof.
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Old 02-21-2009, 09:47 AM   #7
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Good stuff from Robb Wolf's blog....seemed like the right place for it:

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One of the common misconceptions/counter arguments about the paleo diet is that our ancestors “just didn’t eat much meat…animals run away…plants are easier”. At first blush this kinda makes sense, until you trek across ANY open landscape and imagine fueling your life with the vegetation available under foot. Work your way to northern latitudes and the likelihood dwindles further. Anthropologists and archaeologists are fully aware of our ancestors’ prowess as hunters, whether the vegetarians want to buy this proposition or not. This debate becomes something akin to a tennis volley or a little kid’s argument “Yes it is!, No it’s not!!” I guess you can dismiss the obvious like the archaeological record, but there are other arguments that border on first order, foundational notions. Here are a few papers to consider:

Physical Activity, energy expenditure and fitness. This is an analysis of contemporary hunter gatherers and extrapolations from archaeological data. The take-home is our ancestors were VERY active and burned a lot of K-cals in that activity. From this we consider the next paper:

Plant to Animal Subsistence Ratios. This is an analysis of over 200 hunter gatherer groups and what they ate. Two interesting things emerge: A-more than 50% of cals came from animal sources. B-It is thermodynamically IMPOSSIBLE to feed the activity level of our ancestors on the plants available to our paleolithic ancestors. You either need a fermentive gut and must spend all day grazing like a cow or a gorilla, or you need to kill something. As a side note: There was never a vegetarian hunter gatherer group..or perhaps there was and they died off, but they left no descendants. You do not find vegetarianims until the advent of agriculture.
People may eat alot of vegetables...but it's not going to be a large % of their diet...plain and simple...unless they plan on living on 1500 calories a day and most active hunter/gather types probably need 3000-4000.

That and I eat very little fiber.....and I poop daily just fine.

Chances are if there were vegetarian based hunter gather tribers...they were isolated from other meat eating tribes, as the meat eaters would of easily conquered them and took their land....of course no scientific data to back up that assumption.
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Old 02-21-2009, 11:04 AM   #8
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But it does make sense MOD. Agriculture en masse was made to feed thousands and millions of the poor. Not a tribe of multiple families. They could just hunt their food and live off what the land naturally provided.

I'm with Robb on this one.
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Old 02-21-2009, 02:00 PM   #9
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Holy cow, ~130g of fiber/day? No wonder they had to be nomadic, all the areas nearby would be covered with "cow-patty-shaped" coprolites within a week at that rate!
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Old 02-21-2009, 03:24 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett Smith View Post
Holy cow, ~130g of fiber/day? No wonder they had to be nomadic, all the areas nearby would be covered with "cow-patty-shaped" coprolites within a week at that rate!
But think how well the ground was fertilized!
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