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Old 03-03-2009, 06:11 AM   #51
Garrett Smith
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I had to think about this subject last night.

Yesterday was March 3rd, my last previous snatch workouts were on January 27th and 20th, so this was the first time I had snatched in something like ~5 weeks.

I tend to be of the belief that OLs require relatively consistent practice. I didn't get that in this case, obviously.

Well, I started my lifting last night with my goal weight of 72.5kg for 1 rep. I got to 70kg, felt really good, so I jumped to ~80kg. (I do these big jumps sometimes, I feel fine about it, others sometimes don't)

Missed the first one, nailed the second. PR by 3kg after 5 weeks off?!?

Due to this recent event, and the fact that my 6-month-old just started teething (which means reduced sleep again), I'm considering taking 1 week off every 2 weeks of OL training, keeping the yoga and gymnastics as usual on my "off OL" weeks.

It would appear I do well with more, rather than less, rest.
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Old 03-03-2009, 09:00 AM   #52
Stephen Brown
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gant Grimes View Post
Mine's kinda like that, but different.

1 week on, regular weekend
1 week on, enjoy myself too much over weekend
1 week on, minus Monday, which is a recovery day because of weekend
1 week on, eat crappy over weekend; ignore training on Saturday and go fishing
something happens, miss several days of training
2 weeks assorted, random crap, eat crappy on weekend
repeat as needed

Publish this before someone steals it.
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Old 03-08-2009, 08:41 PM   #53
Patrick Donnelly
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Originally Posted by matthew eucalitto View Post
This is not a slam against any other group, but I am really glad I found these forums as the conversations are much more coherent and relevant...and people are willing to actually discuss ideas rather than slamming them down.

So thanks.
I agree. There have been several good reads here lately. More than enough to keep me busy. Thanks, everyone.
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Old 04-02-2009, 11:26 AM   #54
Christian Mason
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This is purely anecdotal, but I've found that when I back off the intensity a touch I can actually handle a good deal more volume. This seems to be something missing in the (3-weeks on/half intensity week and 3 weeks on/week off) planning.

I've had better luck viewing it more as a circular wave pattern. When intensity is at the lowest, volume is at the highest and vice versa.

The old Crossfit adage of "If you want more work than the WOD, you didn't go hard enough" may be true during the point of peak intensity in the cycle I mention above - but I've found that intensity peaks are better when they're shored up with significantly higher volumes of lower intensity work (hmm, kinda like classic peridozation).
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Old 04-03-2009, 08:43 AM   #55
Gavin Harrison
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Originally Posted by Christian Mason View Post
This is purely anecdotal, but I've found that when I back off the intensity a touch I can actually handle a good deal more volume. This seems to be something missing in the (3-weeks on/half intensity week and 3 weeks on/week off) planning.

I've had better luck viewing it more as a circular wave pattern. When intensity is at the lowest, volume is at the highest and vice versa.

The old Crossfit adage of "If you want more work than the WOD, you didn't go hard enough" may be true during the point of peak intensity in the cycle I mention above - but I've found that intensity peaks are better when they're shored up with significantly higher volumes of lower intensity work (hmm, kinda like classic peridozation).
What you're calling "Circular Wave" or "Classic Periodization", is called "Linear Periodization" by the rest of the world.
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Old 04-03-2009, 09:33 AM   #56
Garrett Smith
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See the quote in my sig for words of wisdom on high intensity.

For WODs, the increased power output going from 90% effort/intensity to 100% effort/intensity is not worth the stress/strain it puts on the adrenals and CNS recovery long-term.

Yeah, that's why someone wouldn't "race" every day, much less every weekend. Burnout and injuries are sure to follow. Some folks seem to think that this doesn't apply to their style of workout because one author said so.
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Old 04-03-2009, 12:25 PM   #57
Donald Lee
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Here are some relevant bits from Supertraining regarding strength training. I know strength training and CrossFit are somewhat different, but this may be interesting food for thought nonetheless:

Quote:
It is vital to recognise a training maximum TF max or training 1RM (single repetition maximum), which is always less than the competition maximum CFmax in experienced athletes, because optimal motivation invariably occurs under competitive conditions (Fig 1.1). Zatsiorsky states that the training maximum is the heaviest load which one can lift without substantial emotional excitement, as indicated by a very significant rise in heart rate before the lift (Medvedev, 1986). It is noteworthy that, in the untrained person, involuntary or hypnotic conditions can increase strength output by up to 35%, but by less than 10% in the trained athlete. The mean difference between TFmax and CFmax is approximately 12.5 +/-2.5% in experienced weightlifters, with a large difference being exhbited by lifters in heavier weight classes (Zatsiorsky, 1995).

....Intensity is usually defined as a certain percentage of one's maximum and it is most practical to choose this on the basis of the competitive maximum, which remains approximately constant for a fairly prolonged period. The training maximum can vary daily, so, while it may be of value in prescribing training for less qualified athletes, it is of limited value for the elite competitor.

It is relevant to note that competitions involve very few attempts to reach a maximum, yet they are far more exhausting than strenuous workouts with many repetitions, since they involve extremely high levels of psychological and nervous stress. The high levels of nervous and emotional stress incurred by attempting a competitive maximum require many days or even weeks to reach full recovery, even though physical recuperation would appear to be complete, so that this type of loading is not recommended as a regular form of training.

In other words, any attempt to exceed limit weights requires an increase in nervous excitation and interference with the athlete's ability to adapt, if this type of training is used frequently. In attempting to understand the intensity of loading prescribed by the apparently extreme Bulgarian coaches who are reputed to stipulate frequent or daily use of maximum loads in training, one has to appreciate that training with training maxima (which do not maximally stress the nervous system) is very different from training with competitive maxima (which place great stress on nervous processes).
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:00 AM   #58
Christian Mason
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What you're calling "Circular Wave" or "Classic Periodization", is called "Linear Periodization" by the rest of the world.
The "circular wave" was my off the cuff rambling.

But I was using classic and linear periodization interchangeably. This seems to be
common practice at my schools grad program. Is this incorrect or a regional quirk of some kind?
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Old 04-06-2009, 08:59 PM   #59
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There are so many types of periodization that it seems contrived to call one classic, and more descriptive names are better for discussion in any case. I think it's probably called classic periodization in most schools because it's the most common in the western world.
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Old 04-07-2009, 06:07 AM   #60
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Nice post, Donald.
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