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Old 01-28-2009, 07:11 PM   #1
Matthew Woodley
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Default Supraspinatus Tendon Strain

I apparently have a supraspinatus tendon strain. I have seen my GP and this has been diagnosed. I have got PT booked in, but the earliest I could get in is in a weeks time. Are there any exercises or rehabilitation practices I should be carrying out right now?

I only get pain when doing dips and on exercises such as shoulder press and other above head pressing lifts. Do you think it would be okay to continue lower body training like squats, lunges etc..?
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Old 01-28-2009, 08:04 PM   #2
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Avoid stuff that has pain. Ask your doc or PT what you are allowed to do. Probably going to be some RC rehab work to bring up strength...

Lower body work is definitely a good idea.
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Old 01-29-2009, 04:57 AM   #3
Garrett Smith
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As long as holding the bar in lower body exercises doesn't irritate your shoulder, do it.

Front squats shouldn't be a problem, but back squat type bar placement could be.

Main rule is, if it hurts, don't do it. Otherwise you should be okay until you get to the PT. Contrast hydrotherapy (hot & cold alternating, always ending on cold, google) would be helpful.
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Old 02-20-2009, 10:11 PM   #4
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It turns out that my shoulder problem is impingement. It no longer hurts anymore and I have slowly started building up strength in the overhead press. I have been given the option of having a cortisone shot, would it be advisable to have this? I am not currently experiencing any pain. How long does it take for impingement bursitis to go away?
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Old 02-20-2009, 10:17 PM   #5
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Cortisone shot is most likely only temporary, and will weaken your tendons and ligaments in the process (this is well-accepted, not bashing conventional med). If you don't currently hurt, I would absolutely NOT do it.

More external rotation work, along with lots of thoracic anterior-posterior mobility work.

Wall Extensions (see gymnasticbodies.com youtube). DB Cuban presses. Robb Wolf's free PMenu "Kyphosis" article.
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Old 02-21-2009, 10:23 AM   #6
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What Garrett said.

Also, avoid pain in the exercises.... ice after any exercise. Anti-inflams are good.
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Old 02-21-2009, 01:48 PM   #7
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Thanks guys for the quick responses. Excuse my ignorance but what exactly is anterior-posterior mobility work?

Also, how long does it usually take to recover from impingement?
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Old 02-21-2009, 02:18 PM   #8
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Getting your external rotators strong and mobilizing the thoracic spine can take weeks to months of steady work. How much time depends on your issue and how much effort and care you choose to put into it. That will likely be the long-term "cure" to your impingement, so whatever it takes, it will most likely be worth it. If you give up early or don't do it at all, modern medicine will be more than happy to provide you with cortisone injections and surgery, or alternative practitioners will offer you all sorts of treatments, when the real problem is the "posture" of your thoracic spine & scapula.

Kyphosis article.

Wall extensions.

DB Cuban press.

Article on thoracic spine health and mobility. Anterior and posterior mobilty of the thoracic spine means the ability (or not) to translate the thoracic spine "forwards" and "backwards" (think chest forward and chest sunken).

That should cover it.
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Old 02-21-2009, 07:27 PM   #9
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Garrett's got it.

Recovery depends on how bad it is.... like any injury.
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Old 02-21-2009, 09:30 PM   #10
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I forgot to add, I've got a mild issue with impingement in my right shoulder.

I have good thoracic mobility and good scapular stability from the gymnastics training.

Adding the external rotation work is the last key, I need more strength in that area.

I believe that will pretty much take care of the issue, and I plan on maintaining that strength.

If the cause of the impingement isn't fixed, it will keep coming back, especially as one does more and heavier "overhead" work.
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