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Old 05-07-2009, 07:45 AM   #21
Peter Dell'Orto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sara Fleming View Post
(. . . ) but I do feel that having a focus specified for the individual's needs and then having a plan designed to get them there based on their individual assessment (as opposed to the functional blitzkrieg) is safer and more psychologically motivating.
I think that's really well said, and in my opinion spot-on. Even if you've all got the same goals, not everyone is going to have the same needs. You can't make everyone take the same road at the same speed and expect get to the same results. I think you've got the right approach, and one I'd want if I came to a Crossfit gym looking for training.

Honestly, if I'm paying for training from an affiliate or any other gym, why would I pay to get the same thing as everyone else at all times? Same reps, same weight, same rest times, etc. If I'm going to go to a gym and pay for training, not just gym access, I'm going to expect them to train a unique and specific me, not just a generic everyme.
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:56 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Brian DeGennaro View Post
"Friday 030523
Complete 7 rounds of:

Barbell Thrusters 3 reps
5 Pull-ups"
I wonder if that would even make it as a warmup these days? It's a mere 21 thrusters and 35 pullups, without a cool name attached to give it a cachet.

Interesting to see how it's changed. If it is planned upticks in volume, then the "Jump in and scale if you have to" and "Just do the WOD" approaches are seriously flawed...you can't come years into a program and scale or just-do-it to catch up. Imagine joining a 4-year Olympic lifting program a year in. What would that accomplish? You need to start where the others started, yet new trainees are encouraged to learn to scale on their own and jump in. For that reason alone I think it's just escalation of exercise demands based on perceived toughness. "You thought Fran was bad? Try JT! Not good enough, well, suck on this new one..."

Still a lot of value in the workouts, but I think you really need a plan that fits the people you feed into it, not people who happen to fit into the plan. I think that's what Garrett means by revealing athletes rather than creating them.
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Old 05-07-2009, 08:12 AM   #23
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Peter,
I mean it more along the lines of other things, like:

"Sports don't build character, they reveal it."
and
"Long metcons don't build mental toughness, they reveal it."

As others have said, including the article, smart programming (in anything) will get better and faster results than a one-size-fits-all mainpage WOD.
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Old 05-07-2009, 11:08 AM   #24
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Interesting pt.'s....the actual programming merits aside, the CF gyms themselves are really alluring -- at least to me...bumper plates, rings, etc. in an environment where the proverbial "blood, sweat, tears" isn't frowned upon....

I'm liking the freedom and exploration that goes along w/ charting your own personal course, but the "environment" of CF is tough to duplicate, and I think it's very conducive towards a very consistent level of high effort/intensity. Quite possibly this very same effort and intensity can end up as a double-edged sword when following a straightline CF program. I'd honestly be as apt to pay the monthly dues to simply use the CF facility "carte blanche".
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Old 05-07-2009, 11:25 AM   #25
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CF gyms themselves are really alluring -- at least to me...bumper plates, rings, etc. in an environment where the proverbial "blood, sweat, tears" isn't frowned upon....

I'm liking the freedom and exploration that goes along w/ charting your own personal course, but the "environment" of CF is tough to duplicate

It's incredibly easy to duplicate.

PL garage gyms have existed like this for decades. I suspect Oly is the same way. Of the few gymnastic academys and boxing gyms I've been in, pretty much the same thing. The building is a place to get the thing done, in many you don't know who owns what..stuff has just been collected over the years. (except for CD's, you put your name on that shit)

Near me there are two other very serious crews of guys training SM, one group in a warehouse another in some dudes yard. Highland Games folks meet on rainy saturady mornings at local high schools...

It's the People, not the "program" or the space.
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Old 05-07-2009, 11:57 AM   #26
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Interesting pt.'s....the actual programming merits aside, the CF gyms themselves are really alluring -- at least to me...bumper plates, rings, etc. in an environment where the proverbial "blood, sweat, tears" isn't frowned upon....

I'm liking the freedom and exploration that goes along w/ charting your own personal course, but the "environment" of CF is tough to duplicate, and I think it's very conducive towards a very consistent level of high effort/intensity. Quite possibly this very same effort and intensity can end up as a double-edged sword when following a straightline CF program. I'd honestly be as apt to pay the monthly dues to simply use the CF facility "carte blanche".
I totally agree with the last part.

I've liked having training partners around more lately (I have one buddy who I OL with, one who does gymnastic strength training with me), and I find that I can train harder with them. That being said, I do also like not having training partners at times...it makes it easier to "go easy" when I feel like I need to.

An "open gym" at a facility that had typical CF equipment would be fun, for those well-educated in the movements and programming of their interested goals to be trusted on their own. I'd judge that there aren't enough of those types of folks around to keep any gym open, hence the class format.

I'd love to set up an industrial space gym with the basics for OL, PL, and basic gymnastics strength training and make it an "open" gym...but for now, my garage and the gymnastics gym will have to do...and I'm fine with that.
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Old 05-07-2009, 06:45 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Dave Van Skike View Post
It's the People, not the "program" or the space.
Yeah.

I wouldn't go so far as to say it's easy to create such an atmosphere; you can't just set up and have one. But it's not that uncommon.

I've trained for the past 8 months or so in a really hardcore gym with a great atmosphere. I pretty much did the "show up, STFU, and train" thing for months before I started to feel like I was proving myself. I couldn't help but get better because the place was always filled with other athletes giving it their best. Nobody sandbagging a workout, ever. My MMA gym is pretty much the same - if you don't work hard, you really won't stick around because you'll be the only one.

So like Dave said, that's not unique to CF. I hope that it's common to CF gyms, though. I think a lot of the elements of CF I like contribute to this - the hard workouts, the drive for continued demonstrations of progress (time, reps, weight, or rounds). That might make it easier to foster such an atmosphere. I've only been to one and everyone seemed to be really dedicated, but I wasn't there long enough to get infected by the drive because I was just a short-stay drop-in...so my experience is really limited there.
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Old 05-07-2009, 06:51 PM   #28
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Peter,
I mean it more along the lines of other things, like:

"Sports don't build character, they reveal it."
and
"Long metcons don't build mental toughness, they reveal it."
Ah, okay. I was confused by the reference to relative newbies making the later rounds of CF Games selection. Figured that meant the CF process was selecting out the pre-disposed rather than generating monsters out of the ranks.
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Old 05-07-2009, 08:55 PM   #29
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Figured that meant the CF process was selecting out the pre-disposed rather than generating monsters out of the ranks.
That's exactly what I meant. The best CFers were already good athletes before they ever got there.
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Old 05-07-2009, 09:39 PM   #30
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I read the article, and thought it was great, and this is from an affiliate owner.

I've been incorporating elements of periodization in our training for some time. We'll sometimes break the programming down into 2 month or so blocks, assign some goals to the cycle, and have at it.

This past winter, we incorporated a higher frequency of lifting, along with relatively shorter metcons. Moving into the spring/summer, we're getting into longer metcons, and more skill-based work.

These cycles aren't particularly rigid, and we'll still throw a wrench in the mix every once in awhile with a much longer or shorter workout than expected, etc.. but we are noticing that though we've been around a few years now, gym records are being set not only in the lifts, but now that we're shifting into a little less lifting and more metcons, in many of the CrossFit benchmark WODs as well as frequently repeated gym workouts.

So yeah, I buy that long term planning has it's place, even though to the casual observer it might still be too "highly varied". When I do private programming, strength programming is much more detailed even if it does include a great deal of CF. In a group class setting, it just isn't practical - people come at different frequencies on different days. To make up for that, we shift the training towards the current goals at the time, and it has worked well so far.
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