Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Training > Equipment

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-01-2009, 10:11 AM   #1
Patrick Donnelly
Senior Member
 
Patrick Donnelly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 720
Default Cutting a tire in half for sledgehammering. Help?

The end goal is a cushion for me to use for sledgehammer blows. The plan I have to do that is as follows:

1. Obtain a large tire - not tractor large, but larger than the regular car tire.
2. Cut it in half along a diameter.
3. Use contact cement to adhere the pieces together (doubling the size of the strike-zone).
4. Secure the tire to a thick plywood base.
5. Side a few plates on the base underneath the tires to weigh it down.
6. Have at it.

I've done #1. That was easy. #2 is giving me trouble. I've already marked out the lines for the cuts and given them a good gash with a utility blade. However, I can't get any further. It seems to be that there's a tapestry of steel wires underneath the first layer of rubber. While it's comforting to know that Goodyear et al. care about us enough to make their tires so durable and safe, that doesn't really help me in my present situation.

How would you recommend getting through this? The wires look think, but they are tough.

I've tried...
* Further cutting with a fresh edge on the utility blade. It's not getting through.
* Drilling a hole through the tire to insert a sabre saw. The drill went right through (with some sparks), but the saber saw keeps getting stuck on the wires as I'm inserting the blade. Also, in light of the third thing I tried, I'm worried that it wouldn't even work anyway.
* Cutting through the tire with a reciprocating saw, with both a wood blade and a hacksaw blade. The wood blade was entirely ineffective. The hacksaw took out a few wires, but I'm afraid that thing is pretty dull from one time where I accidentally used it on a block of wood. (Didn't bother checking which blade was in before going to make the cut.) This also started smoking pretty quick, making me concerned that too much cutting like that might cause the blade to heat up, lose strength, and snap. Pouring some water on the tire stopped the heat, but didn't make the cutting any more effective.

Ideas I've had...
* A chisel to snap the wires, then continue cutting the rubber as usual. Unfortunately, I don't have a chisel, but I really should get one anyway. I'm thinking that with enough pressure, it might do the trick. However, the flex of the tire might absorb the force.
* Angle grinder. If all else fails, the angle grinder succeeds. I've cut a doorknob off a door using this thing. It was some odd variation with a snap-on cap covering the screws that I couldn't snap off. Of course, this also took about two hours of careful grinding, but it worked. I simply want to avoid this though because it'd make a very mess cut, and once again, there'd be the issue with the heat.


So... Any ideas?
__________________
And yes, I'm actually holding that handstand. Get on my level.
Patrick Donnelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2009, 05:34 PM   #2
Garrett Smith
Senior Member
 
Garrett Smith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 4,368
Default

Call a tire shop, they might think you're crazy, but they would probably know how to go about this. Or...

Get a semi tire. Forget about the cutting and mounting. Work on your or your client's targeting skill if you need a bigger target than the width of a semi tire.
__________________
Garrett Smith NMD CSCS BS, aka "Dr. G"
RepairRecoverRestore.com - Blood, Saliva, and Stool Testing
My radio show - The Path to Strength and Health
Garrett Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2009, 04:48 AM   #3
Bob Overstreet
New Member
 
Bob Overstreet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Northern Cincinnati area
Posts: 9
Default

Do you have access to a saws-all? A favorite in maintenance departments or where "de-construction" is being done. The name pretty much says it all.
__________________
46/6'2"/M/220
Bob Overstreet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2009, 05:06 AM   #4
Jay Cohen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Western Pa
Posts: 416
Default

Are you nuts??

Just get a second tire, get a few tires. It's just taking a big friggin hammer and hitting a big friggin tire.

How can you take something soooooooooooooooooooo simple and make it sooooooooooooo hard?

Have you considered running for a governmental position?

Please take pictures if you're using a motorized saw and catch one of the steel belts. Google chain saw kickback.
Jay Cohen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2009, 09:09 AM   #5
Patrick Donnelly
Senior Member
 
Patrick Donnelly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 720
Default

Garrett, why did I not consider calling a tire shop before? Wow. My generation, myself included, is so dependent on the internet that it's disturbing. Thanks for sending a moment of "Duh" my way.

Bob, the sawz-all is a reciprocating saw, which I've already tried. However, the hacksaw blade was a bit dulled, as I had said before. I remember once at work last summer one guy using a DeWalt reciprocating saw to cut through several pieces of rebar, but it wasn't easy and DeWalt tools are far better than my Ryobi's. (Eleiko to Pendlay, basically.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Cohen View Post
Are you nuts??
A lil' bit.

I can't afford the space for a large tractor tire, meaning that a smaller tire placed vertically is the next best bet. I like Ross Enamait's idea right here, but unfortunately, I need things to look at least moderately nice.
__________________
And yes, I'm actually holding that handstand. Get on my level.
Patrick Donnelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2009, 09:38 AM   #6
Dave Van Skike
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,738
Default

Patrick, with all warmth and respect...U... R... High...
__________________
Practical Strength
Dave Van Skike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2009, 10:02 AM   #7
Garrett Smith
Senior Member
 
Garrett Smith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 4,368
Default

Listen to DVS, he knows of what he speaks.
__________________
Garrett Smith NMD CSCS BS, aka "Dr. G"
RepairRecoverRestore.com - Blood, Saliva, and Stool Testing
My radio show - The Path to Strength and Health
Garrett Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2009, 03:15 PM   #8
garrett stack
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 49
Default

just in case a tire shop in your locale may have one of these

http://www.glenmartin.com/erit.html
garrett stack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2009, 06:45 PM   #9
Joe Hart
Senior Member
 
Joe Hart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Lino Lakes, MN
Posts: 327
Default

Get a bobcat / skid loader tire. They are short and wide. Get a sheet of plywood some 4x4s. put the tire on the plywood 4x4s on each side. Screw them down and bolt a chain across that will go through the tire. That way the tire will stay put whilst whailing the hell out of it. Did that make sense?
Joe Hart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2009, 07:35 PM   #10
Dave Van Skike
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: PNW
Posts: 1,738
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett Smith View Post
Listen to DVS, he knows of what he speaks.
i know that you know that i know what that means.....
__________________
Practical Strength
Dave Van Skike is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:42 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator