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Old 07-16-2009, 09:20 AM   #21
Garrett Smith
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grissim Connery View Post
do you have values for homocysteine, c-reactive protein, IL-6, and TNF-alpha?
I highly doubt those were done on a check-up bloodwork.
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Old 07-16-2009, 10:45 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Jay Cohen View Post
Mike, yep, need to add some more fruit and veggies, will probable add in some more chicken and fish and not eat pork/beef every day. I was hitting the meat pretty hard. Thanks for the feedback
I remember reading long ago about a study that said adding Vit C (500mg I think) before a fast food meal reduce oxidative damage from the meal by like....well alot....and for the life of me can't find that study anymore....

I'm sure you also know that "grass fed" should be the choice.....as that will reduce the overall sat fat/MUFA ratio (since wild game have lower sat and higher mufa) and reduce excess proinflammatory omega 6 grains in the fat of grain fed meat. Worst case...trim the visible fat on the grain fed meats.
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Old 07-16-2009, 11:03 AM   #23
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He pretty much lives in farm country so he has access to grass fed everything. At least that was the impression I got from meatfest.
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Old 07-16-2009, 11:26 AM   #24
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Get your Vitamin D tested the next time with your bloodwork. Low vitamin D raises cholesterol, as the body tries to make more "raw material" to be turned into Vit. D with sun exposure.
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Old 07-29-2009, 06:50 AM   #25
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Another study on fruit and vegetables consumption and cholesterol.

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Fruit and vegetable consumption and LDL cholesterol: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.

ABSTRACT


Background: An elevated LDL-cholesterol concentration is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The association between fruit and vegetable consumption and LDL has been inconsistent.

Objective: The objective was to determine whether a high intake of fruit and vegetables is inversely associated with LDL concentrations.

Design: We used data collected from 4466 subjects in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study to study the association between fruit and vegetable consumption and serum LDL. We used a food-frequency questionnaire to assess fruit and vegetable intakes and regression models to estimate adjusted mean LDL according to fruit and vegetable consumption.

Results: The mean (±SD) age of the men (n = 2047) was 51.5 ± 14.0 y and that of the women (n = 2419) was 52.2 ± 13.7 y. The average daily serving of fruit and vegetables was 3.2 ± 1.7 for men and was 3.5 ± 1.8 for women. Fruit and vegetable consumption was inversely related to LDL: in the categories 0–1.9, 2.0–2.9, 3.0–3.9, and 4 servings/d, multivariate-adjusted mean (95% CI) LDL concentrations were 3.36 (3.28, 3.44), 3.35 (3.27, 3.43), 3.26 (3.17, 3.35), and 3.17 (3.09, 3.25) mmol/L, respectively, for men (P for trend < 0.0001) and 3.35 (3.26, 3.44), 3.22 (3.14, 3.30), 3.21 (3.13, 3.29), and 3.11 (3.04, 3.18), respectively, for women (P for trend < 0.0001). This association was observed across categories of age, education, smoking status, physical activity, and tertiles of Keys score. Exclusion of subjects with prevalent diabetes mellitus or coronary artery disease did not alter these results significantly.

Conclusion: Consumption of fruit and vegetables is inversely related to LDL in men and women.
http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/79/2/213
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Old 04-06-2012, 09:29 AM   #26
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Ok, I know, the last post on this thread was '09...

I've been looking more into blood issues lately and have just watched a very interesting vid on endo at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM
Dr. Lutsig does a great job of giving a primer on a pretty complicated subject.

In the vid he goes into a discussion on the real importance of Triglyceride/HDL ratios vs. Chol/HDL ratios. If what he says is so, and I believe it is, then re-evaluation of your blood test is in order.

My most recent numbers:

Name Result Ref Range
CHOLESTEROL CHOL 203 mg/dl 125-200

TRIGLYCERIDES TRIG 80 mg/dl 0-150

HDL* HDL 61 mg/dl 40-199

CHOLEST/HDL RATIO CHOL/H 3.33 0.0-5.00

VLDL* VLDL 16 mg/dl 0-30

LDL NLDL 126 mg/dl 0-130

Looking at my chol/hdl ration as the primary barometer of lipid ratio health one would conclude I should be planning for my funeral arrangements. But, according to Dr. Lutsig, and using the TG/HDL ratio as the primary barometer, my risk for heart/blood disorders is extremely low, 80/61 = 1.31 (ref ranges for this ratio are 2 and 4, < 2 being great, > 4 being bad).

For comparison purposes, my most prior numbers:

Name Result Ref Range
CHOLESTEROL CHOL 216 mg/dl 125-200

TRIGLYCERIDES TRIG 56 mg/dl 0-150

HDL* HDL 66 mg/dl 40-199

CHOLEST/HDL RATIO CHOL/H 3.27 0.0-5.00

VLDL* VLDL (not given)

LDL NLDL 139 mg/dl 0-130

TG/HDL ratio 56/66 = 0.848 , < 1 !
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:18 AM   #27
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From what I understand

trig/HDL and LDL/HDL are better predictors of cvd than CHOL/HDL

And thus your numbers would look very good

There's no correlation between CHOL and CVD
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