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Old 12-01-2009, 07:35 AM   #21
Brian DeGennaro
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Also, Bo, keep in mind that Arden has incredibly high lifting numbers as a result, he will burn out much faster than you if he put in much higher intensity.
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Old 12-01-2009, 09:47 AM   #22
Arden Cogar Jr.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian DeGennaro View Post
Also, Bo, keep in mind that Arden has incredibly high lifting numbers as a result, he will burn out much faster than you if he put in much higher intensity.
Thanks Brian. And I'm older. Middle aged training must be a lot more thought out than younger training. Sounds a bit rudimentary, but there's a lot of truth to it.

One other point to add, if you ever feel tired and listless, there is no crime in missing a day. I've found great solace in taking an extra day to recover then resuming my next day's training. I've found myself invigorated and raring to go after an extra rest day.

That may not be a big an issue given your age, but something to keep in mind if you're body feels beat up after a bit.

Well, to be frank, there's one other point. In addition to taking that extra rest day, don't be afraid to "festive feed" to help yourself recover as well. I CANNOT do that at this stage of my life as I once did during my youth. Instead, I now imbibe in a "festive meal" followed by late afternoon nap (if it's a weekend).

Oh, the joys of aging. I Love every second of it.

All the best,
Arden
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Old 12-01-2009, 11:24 AM   #23
Bo Schmidt
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Thank you so much for replying. I'll definitely use everything you've said. Having ones ego prevent succesful training is something I'd like to avoid. Thanks again!
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Old 12-01-2009, 12:38 PM   #24
Brian Baggetta
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I think the lifting stuff has been covered very well, and you should definitely take it all to heart, which it seems like you have. Just pick a real program (5-3-1, CA, Texas, SS, whatever) and stick with it.

I would add a small note of dissent, though, and say you shouldn't bag sprinting entirely for a period if it's one of the things you want to improve. You can become pretty de-trained/lose your movement efficiency at sprinting if you *never* do it. You don't have to do much, but do get out and sprint. I would recommend once a week -- it's enough to keep the movement pattern ingrained, but not so much that it will screw with your lifts. Check out this w/f/s article for ideas: http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/speedtraining.html

And I wouldn't mess with Tabatas or the "walk back to recover" method (unless you're walking REALLY f'ing slow). Those protocols are geared more toward improving conditioning than speed, and if you're looking to improve your 100m time by 1.5-2 seconds, they likely won't get you there. Concentrate on short distances, with full recovery (at least one minute per 10m sprinted).

Good luck.
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Old 12-01-2009, 02:34 PM   #25
Alex Bond
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Baggetta View Post
I think the lifting stuff has been covered very well, and you should definitely take it all to heart, which it seems like you have. Just pick a real program (5-3-1, CA, Texas, SS, whatever) and stick with it.

I would add a small note of dissent, though, and say you shouldn't bag sprinting entirely for a period if it's one of the things you want to improve. You can become pretty de-trained/lose your movement efficiency at sprinting if you *never* do it. You don't have to do much, but do get out and sprint. I would recommend once a week -- it's enough to keep the movement pattern ingrained, but not so much that it will screw with your lifts. Check out this w/f/s article for ideas: http://www.higher-faster-sports.com/speedtraining.html

And I wouldn't mess with Tabatas or the "walk back to recover" method (unless you're walking REALLY f'ing slow). Those protocols are geared more toward improving conditioning than speed, and if you're looking to improve your 100m time by 1.5-2 seconds, they likely won't get you there. Concentrate on short distances, with full recovery (at least one minute per 10m sprinted).

Good luck.
A quote from that article which the thread starter should take to heart:

Quote:
With the popularization of conjugate training there are many athletes who think they need to be addressing everything they can all of the time in any given mesocycle. Therefore they’re always lifting with the volume that would oftentimes kill a powerlifter and sprinting with the volume that would challenge a professional sprinter. What these people need to realize is you can't always focus on everything all of the time. There is often a delayed training effect for a given regime of work. For example, heavy strength work is necessary. It sets the foundation for everything and makes you stronger. But it is also fatiguing on both the nervous and muscular system and thus, it often takes recovery time to really see the benefits of strength work. It's difficult to run your fastest during the middle of a highly intense concentrated strength phase because your neuromuscular system will simple be too fatigued. Along the same lines, a surefire way to kill the effectiveness of a strength phase is to do too much specific work like running. Likewise, one of the quickest ways to kill the effectiveness of an explosive oriented phase is to drain the hell out of yourself with too much strength work. A better approach is to alternate the “focus” of your training. Work on building up your strength for a while while you maintain your speed. Then work on “maintaining” your strength while you focus on your speed.
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Old 12-01-2009, 04:02 PM   #26
Garrett Smith
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The last three sentences of that Baggett quote are the most important.

For example, in my training year, OL meets dominate the first half, PL dominates the second half. Highland Games get thrown in for fun here and there, I don't really train specifically for them (yet). Two days of gymnastics strength training is always in there, I recently completely gutted the program I was doing to emphasize handstands and weighted chins/dips. After I get strong enough and decide on a meet (and probably sacrifice going to an OL meet or two), I'll get some sound advice on how to work in some training for running a 100m & 400m in a meet.

Changing the focus is actually what keeps me interested, it allows for a more focused approach to my output and especially my programming.
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