Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Nutrition > Supplements

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-20-2010, 06:06 AM   #1
Matt Edwards
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Springfield, MA
Posts: 225
Default Creatine timing

Now I know the best time to take creatine is after your workout so. My question relates to when two-a-days come into play. I've just started up two-a-days and am starting up creatine to help with the increase in volume/frequency. What I'm wondering is if you should take half your dosage after the 1st workout and the other half after the 2nd, or just take the full dosage after the 2nd workout?
Matt Edwards is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2010, 10:11 AM   #2
Greg Davis
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 332
Default

Assuming your two a days are not every day, and for the sake of simplicity, I would say just stick to taking the same dose around every workout.
__________________
homepage: gregdavis.ca
Greg Davis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2010, 11:21 AM   #3
Mike ODonnell
Senior Member
 
Mike ODonnell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,596
Default

I would say more ideal is pre-workout (and/or during) mixed with BCAAs.
__________________
Fitness Spotlight
The IF Life
Mike ODonnell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2010, 01:23 PM   #4
Matt Edwards
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Springfield, MA
Posts: 225
Default

The creatine I got is already mixed with BCAAs. And on the pre-post workout, I go with post because of your body looking to "soak up" as much as possible and cramming the muscles with it for the next workout, more along the lines as a form of recovery. I know the pre- method has in mind using it up during that workout.
Matt Edwards is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2010, 05:48 PM   #5
Steven Low
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,091
Default

Pre method from what I've heard is ineffective because creatine which is very hydrophilic will pull water from the body into the intestines thus decreasing your hydration levels resulting in worse performance.

I would, in general, take it after the last workout for the day.

But if you want to split it up between the two workouts go for it.

See what works best through experimenting.
__________________
Posts NOT intended as professional medical, training or nutrition advice.
Site // Bodyweight Strength Training Article // Overcoming Gravity Bodyweight Book
Steven Low is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2010, 09:12 AM   #6
Mike ODonnell
Senior Member
 
Mike ODonnell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,596
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
I would say more ideal is pre-workout (and/or during) mixed with BCAAs.
I retract my original assumption and stand corrected....pre may not be as ideal as I initially believed as I was just lumping it in with the pre-wo bcaa advantage.

Quote:
J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2002 Sep;42(3):320-9.
Pre-exercise oral creatine ingestion does not improve prolonged intermittent sprint exercise in humans.

Preen D, Dawson B, Goodman C, Lawrence S, Beilby J, Ching S.

Department of Human Movement and Exercise Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia. dpreen@mbox.com.au

BACKGROUND: This investigation determined whether pre-exercise oral Cr ingestion could enhance prolonged intermittent sprint exercise performance. METHODS: EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: a randomised, double-blind crossover design was employed. SETTING: testing was performed at the Western Australian Institute of Sport and participants were monitored and treated by both scientific and medical personnel. PARTICIPANTS: eight active, but not well-trained males with a background in multiple-sprint based sports acted as subjects for this investigation. INTERVENTIONS: subjects ingested either 15 g Cr.H2O or placebo 120 min and 60 min prior to the start of an 80-min maximal sprint cycling task (10 sets of multiple 6-sec sprints with varying active recoveries). Subjects were retested 14 days later, being required to ingest the alternate supplement and repeat the exercise test. MEASURES: performance variables (work done and peak power) were obtained throughout the exercise challenge. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were raised to a peak of 2348+/-223 micromol x l(-1) prior to the commencement of exercise after Cr ingestion. There were no significant changes in any cycling performance parameters following Cr ingestion, although blood La- was significantly lower (p<0.05) than placebo at all time points during were taken preexercise as well as immediately and 3 min post-exercise in order to determine concentrations of ATP, PCr, Cr, La- and glycogen. Venous blood was drawn prior to and on four occasions during the exercise test, and analysed for Cr, NH3+, La- and pH. RESULTS: Serum Cr concentrations exercise, and plasma NH3+ accumulation was also significantly reduced (p<0.05) in the Cr condition, but only in the second half of the 80-min exercise test. Muscle ATP and TCr levels as well as postexercise PCr replenishment were unaffected following Cr administration. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that although the pre-exercise ingestion of a large Cr dose was shown to have some impact on blood borne metabolites, it does not improve maximal prolonged intermittent sprint exercise performance, possibly due to an insufficient time allowed for uptake of serum Cr by skeletal muscle to occur. Therefore, this form of loading does not provide an alternative method of Cr supplementation to the traditional five-day supplementation regimes established by previous research.
and for fun, the BCAA study
Quote:
Timing of amino acid-carbohydrate ingestion alters anabolic response of muscle to resistance exercise
Kevin D. Tipton1,2, Blake B. Rasmussen1,2, Sharon L. Miller1,2, Steven E. Wolf1, Sharla K. Owens-Stovall1, Bart E. Petrini1, and Robert R. Wolfe1,2

1 Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch, and 2 Metabolism Unit, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, Texas 77550

The present study was designed to determine whether consumption of an oral essential amino acid-carbohydrate supplement (EAC) before exercise results in a greater anabolic response than supplementation after resistance exercise. Six healthy human subjects participated in two trials in random order, PRE (EAC consumed immediately before exercise), and POST (EAC consumed immediately after exercise). A primed, continuous infusion of L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine, femoral arteriovenous catheterization, and muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were used to determine phenylalanine concentrations, enrichments, and net uptake across the leg. Blood and muscle phenylalanine concentrations were increased by ~130% after drink consumption in both trials. Amino acid delivery to the leg was increased during exercise and remained elevated for the 2 h after exercise in both trials. Delivery of amino acids (amino acid concentration times blood flow) was significantly greater in PRE than in POST during the exercise bout and in the 1st h after exercise (P < 0.05). Total net phenylalanine uptake across the leg was greater (P = 0.0002) during PRE (209 42 mg) than during POST (81 19). Phenylalanine disappearance rate, an indicator of muscle protein synthesis from blood amino acids, increased after EAC consumption in both trials. These results indicate that the response of net muscle protein synthesis to consumption of an EAC solution immediately before resistance exercise is greater than that when the solution is consumed after exercise, primarily because of an increase in muscle protein synthesis as a result of increased delivery of amino acids to the leg.
__________________
Fitness Spotlight
The IF Life
Mike ODonnell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2010, 02:11 PM   #7
John Filippini
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 166
Default

Not sure where I read it (somewhere on here I think), but wasn't there also some sort of evidence having to do with taking creatine before bed? Something about possibly elevating GH levels.

I admit to being pretty ignorant on the topic, I just jumped on it because it was substantially easier for me to remember to consistently take it. Even if what I'm remembering is totally bs I'll probably stick with it just for that reason, just to make sure I actually get the creatine in me. It'd be nice to know if I'm getting any extra benefit or not though.

Thanks.
John Filippini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2010, 06:07 AM   #8
Michael McKenna
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South Central, PA
Posts: 100
Default

When I started using creatine about 9 years ago, and I only use it rarely now (I haven't used it in about two years), I got great results from taking it 30 minutes before, 30 minutes after my last work set, and in the morning. Loading didn't help at all. On off days, I would take it in the morning and that was it.

I'd power it down with grape juice.
Michael McKenna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2010, 05:25 PM   #9
Steven Low
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,091
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Filippini View Post
Not sure where I read it (somewhere on here I think), but wasn't there also some sort of evidence having to do with taking creatine before bed? Something about possibly elevating GH levels.

I admit to being pretty ignorant on the topic, I just jumped on it because it was substantially easier for me to remember to consistently take it. Even if what I'm remembering is totally bs I'll probably stick with it just for that reason, just to make sure I actually get the creatine in me. It'd be nice to know if I'm getting any extra benefit or not though.

Thanks.
That sounds doubtful considering what creatine is as a molecule for the muscles... and how GH levels are elevated through regulation of the hypothelamus-anterior pituitary..
__________________
Posts NOT intended as professional medical, training or nutrition advice.
Site // Bodyweight Strength Training Article // Overcoming Gravity Bodyweight Book
Steven Low is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2010, 10:15 AM   #10
Mike ODonnell
Senior Member
 
Mike ODonnell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,596
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steven Low View Post
That sounds doubtful considering what creatine is as a molecule for the muscles... and how GH levels are elevated through regulation of the hypothelamus-anterior pituitary..
If you want to peak GH levels and wake up in a pool of sweat in the middle of the night....then just crash your blood sugar right before you go to sleep.
__________________
Fitness Spotlight
The IF Life
Mike ODonnell is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator