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Old 01-15-2010, 03:15 PM   #21
Jeff Yan
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How the hell do you scale walking on your hands if you can't even hold a free handstand?
http://www.gymnasticbodies.com/forum...hp?f=16&t=1392
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Old 01-15-2010, 03:41 PM   #22
David Nittler
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Originally Posted by Brian DeGennaro View Post
I wish they would stop putting "for time" before everything.
Yeah, that issue really has me scratching my head of late.

Handstands are one of the skills I'm working into my daily programming right now. I time them, but the other way around. I've worked myself up to 1:00 against support, and something around 7 or 9 seconds free standing.

I can't see any advantage to racing this "for time."
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Old 01-15-2010, 07:01 PM   #23
Patrick Donnelly
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I can't see any advantage to racing this "for time."
How else will you be able to tell who won?
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Old 01-15-2010, 07:39 PM   #24
Rafe Kelley
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Its not hard to make logical handstand work outs. How about 20 handstand holds for time post total time to comments, or max rep handstand push ups 5 rounds post total to comments, or handstand walk 300 feet graded by fewest falls. For time is great but its not the only way to measure success.
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Old 01-15-2010, 09:44 PM   #25
Brandon Oto
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For what it's worth we used to do handstand walks in gymnastics whether or not you could hold a HS. Gets you up there at least. You can stumble farther than you think.

Course, a sprung floor makes these lessons a little less painful.
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Old 01-15-2010, 11:42 PM   #26
Blair Lowe
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I've been thinking about trying this on the weekend some time. At first it looks nutso, but we'll see how it goes. The 20 HeSPU(on wall) will be very tough as well as the 2m HS. If I scale the HeSPU to back to wall with arms at 90 degrees I should be able to get through them (in a few sets). I'm generally good for clearing the 40' floor in 1-2 attempts right now though I don't think I've ever been able to hit 100'. Maybe walk the floor, pirouette and walk back at best. It's been awhile since I've tried a 2m wallHS.

One of the dangers of this is just completely trashing your wrists if they are not up to par. Even do Handstand shoulder tappers/wall runs can be hard on your wrist if you start falling on your wrists as you perform them.

You can sub 2 HandStand Shoulder tappers per hand for each foot as each step in a HS walk can be between 6" to a foot. Kind of depends on how big your hands are and how good your HS is. 200 Handstand shoulder tappers would not be easy. I think I've ever done while fresh is nearly a 100 but I've seen intermediate level gymnasts be able to do 50-100 in a free HS in place. It's not the same as a walk exactly.

Someone mentioned lately that .com WOD has become sort of a benchmark test at what they think their "elite" CFer athlete should be able to accomplish. That makes more sense than just a programming attempts. That's the only context I can think or they are merely just using the .com as a lab experiment rather than as programming (remember their old model of programming per the 3-1 model?).

Don't you want to be part of an experiment? Sounds kind of like the Chinese Olympic training model. Throw a lot of meat in the machine, most grinds/washes out, and some is still around afterwards and since you have so much meat to begin with; who cares? Now, I've heard that some of their programs have become much more interested in protecting and keeping their athletes healthy in recent years but this was the thoughts and words spoken of many of their athletes in training or after their competitive careers (because their bodies were so wracked and they weren't cared for well if they didn't make it).

For an ELITE training gymnast, it shouldn't pose too much of a problem. I'm pretty sure Coach Sommer's guys would crush this. I might ask him how he thinks they would do on it just for shits and giggles. I think I will ask Roger Harrell as well for fun.
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Old 01-16-2010, 06:35 AM   #27
travis earp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blair Lowe View Post
Someone mentioned lately that .com WOD has become sort of a benchmark test at what they think their "elite" CFer athlete should be able to accomplish. That makes more sense than just a programming attempts. That's the only context I can think or they are merely just using the .com as a lab experiment rather than as programming (remember their old model of programming per the 3-1 model?).

Don't you want to be part of an experiment? Sounds kind of like the Chinese Olympic training model. Throw a lot of meat in the machine, most grinds/washes out, and some is still around afterwards and since you have so much meat to begin with; who cares? Now, I've heard that some of their programs have become much more interested in protecting and keeping their athletes healthy in recent years but this was the thoughts and words spoken of many of their athletes in training or after their competitive careers (because their bodies were so wracked and they weren't cared for well if they didn't make it).
If it's a benchmark or experiment for the "elite" crossfitters, then round those guys up and have them do the WODs. Don't post it on the web for a million people to see and then go run off and do at their local box. Plenty of people still do the .com workout of the day. Not that I really care to see Crossfit better themselves, but those guys need to cut the mad scientist act and get a real coach to write the programming. Like maybe one with a degree and some experience, unlike tough guy Dave Shenanigans Castro...

There's a big difference between the training protocols of the Chinese team (who's lifters have 10+ years of training and some PEDs under their belts) and the slew of crazy that crossfit.com has graciously bestowed upon the internet.
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Old 01-16-2010, 01:47 PM   #28
Stephen Flamm
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I had one guy - with a strong wrestling/MMA background and plenty of handstand practice - run through this as rx'd, though he took his time in between movements. Broke the 100' walk into 2-4 sets, rested a few minutes, held the 2:00 static hold, rested a few minutes, and then went through the HSPU. Took a total of 33:00. He enjoyed it. Everyone else spent 15 minutes practicing free-standing handstands, and then performed a heavily modified, manageable circuit.

I'm just saying, HQ can and should post whatever they want - it's up to the affiliates and athletes who choose to follow the main site to be smart about it. I've actually enjoyed some aspects of the recent bizarre WODs. The whole "Angie", "Cindy", and "Barbara" three day cycle, on the other hand...
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Old 01-16-2010, 01:58 PM   #29
Jeff Yan
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Blair
As far as I know:
-nobody at my gym has come out of this WOD with injuries aside from the expected wrist soreness
-most finished around 15-30 minutes, scaled or RXed
-don't think anybody is actively taking gymnastics, although the more successful ones were likely to have had some background in it, dance or yoga
-nobody made it out like this WOD was particularly worse than any other

While CF has a habit of punishing practitioners who lack skills by prescribing harder substitutions (e.g. 10:1 rope skips to double unders, 4 pull ups & 4 ring dips for every muscle up), in this case, I wouldn't think it to be appropriate. That is, even though it's true that people don't cover a whole foot while taking a handstand step, I'd even say that a substitution of 1 tap for every foot walked, let alone 2 to 1, would be a bit much. So, if handstand walking is possible, but 100' is too difficult then I'd recommend scaling the distance. If handstand walking any distance whatsoever is a huge challenge, then I'd recommend both substituting the movement AND scaling the work by doing even less than 100 shoulder taps per round.

Then again, you're the gymnast.

I'm curious to read how this goes for you.
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Old 01-16-2010, 02:51 PM   #30
Brian DeGennaro
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The other thing with Chinese/Bulgarian type lifting programs is there is a progressive increase in volume, from start to finish, not a jump from 0-60, for everyone. The problem is jumping into the WOD which is 0-60 for most.
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