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Old 02-20-2010, 08:39 PM   #21
Steve Shafley
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I made them choose between the "Walk of Death" and "Suicides" conditioning routines, with suicides simply that sequence basketball players use inside running back and forth.

They didn't like either choice. The next time I had them choose between "Butterflies and Ponies" and "Pretty Princess Tea Party" which were the exact same workouts as before.

I got to take my laughs as I get them.
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Old 02-21-2010, 07:26 AM   #22
Jay Ashman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Shafley View Post
I made them choose between the "Walk of Death" and "Suicides" conditioning routines, with suicides simply that sequence basketball players use inside running back and forth.

They didn't like either choice. The next time I had them choose between "Butterflies and Ponies" and "Pretty Princess Tea Party" which were the exact same workouts as before.

I got to take my laughs as I get them.
Classic, Steve.... classic.
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Old 02-21-2010, 04:59 PM   #23
Steve Shafley
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For the record, the Walk of Death is a lunge/squat thrust+jump combo that gets longer and longer.

There seem to be few things teenage girls hate more than a squat thrust. If they do enough of them, most of them don't have the energy to bother the boy's squad practicing next to them.
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Old 02-21-2010, 06:19 PM   #24
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good workout, Steve... that is death
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Old 02-22-2010, 03:15 AM   #25
James Evans
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Shafley View Post
For the record, the Walk of Death is a lunge/squat thrust+jump combo that gets longer and longer.

There seem to be few things teenage girls hate more than a squat thrust. If they do enough of them, most of them don't have the energy to bother the boy's squad practicing next to them.
I imagine burpees would probably be about as welcome as a hole in the head.
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Old 02-23-2010, 06:28 AM   #26
Cormac O'Brien
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Couple of small additions.

On Gum shields, I believe they are the most important safety equipment on the Rugby pitch. I can't quote much regarding concussion, but I know you are not allowed take the pitch without a gumshield at youth or senior level over here (Ireland). Plus they protect your teeth in a contact situation. I learned tat the expense of the integrity of one of my bottom incisors. Big chip.

If they make you gag, trim the ends and refit untill they don't, shouldn't take too much off them and should still keep your molars apart as your jaw doesn't really bend.

One little conditioning exercise I used to hate was called "up and downs" or "Up, out and down" for Backs.

Sprint a distance (e.g. 22 to halfway line or between tram tracks.) plant turn and sprawl.
Then press up and sprint off back to the other line. Bit like a burpee but with a sprint instead of a jump.
Its a roast and mimics the picking yourself up after a ruck/maul or tackle and getting to the next breakdown. "Up out and down" involves a longer sprint.
Legend has it that the great Micheal Jones did 100 up and downs a day as conditioning.
Could be nonsense but its a good story, and he reinvented the Openside flanker position.

On learning to fall, you can teach someone to Knee>hip>Shoulder but that only helps if they are taken round the hips or knee, or if they are moving forward.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlHo4...eature=related

This is not a big use if you get smashed.

And there are other ways to recycle ball out of contact, e.g, between the legs, which accommodate a drive more but can be a bit more risky if you don't know what your are doing.
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Old 02-23-2010, 08:35 AM   #27
James Evans
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cormac O'Brien View Post
Couple of small additions.

On Gum shields, I believe they are the most important safety equipment on the Rugby pitch. I can't quote much regarding concussion, but I know you are not allowed take the pitch without a gumshield at youth or senior level over here (Ireland). Plus they protect your teeth in a contact situation. I learned tat the expense of the integrity of one of my bottom incisors. Big chip.

If they make you gag, trim the ends and refit untill they don't, shouldn't take too much off them and should still keep your molars apart as your jaw doesn't really bend.

One little conditioning exercise I used to hate was called "up and downs" or "Up, out and down" for Backs.

Sprint a distance (e.g. 22 to halfway line or between tram tracks.) plant turn and sprawl.
Then press up and sprint off back to the other line. Bit like a burpee but with a sprint instead of a jump.
Its a roast and mimics the picking yourself up after a ruck/maul or tackle and getting to the next breakdown. "Up out and down" involves a longer sprint.
Legend has it that the great Micheal Jones did 100 up and downs a day as conditioning.
Could be nonsense but its a good story, and he reinvented the Openside flanker position.
Cormac, I had no idea that gum shields were mandatory in Ireland. I think that is incredibly sensible.

And I second your suggestion of Up Downs.
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Old 02-23-2010, 08:43 AM   #28
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I believe they are mandatory in America as well. I recall before games the ref checking the cleats and checking for mouthguards.
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Old 02-23-2010, 08:55 AM   #29
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Sometimes we'd get our studs checked, sometimes not.

Often the refs who were into the little safety touches were the ones not so keen on learning the rules of the game!
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:05 AM   #30
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hi steve...i am an ex under 18,19 and 20 provincial (ulster) player with 12 years playing all ireland league, 2 years in johannesburg playing for wanderers rfc and a season in maine playing for portland rfc..i am sure you understand the difficulties in conveying much helpfull advice to you over the interweb...however, the most important drills i took part in at an early age, me bing a fly half/ centre, were the classic 2 attackers on 1 defender, 3 on 2, 4 on 3 etc etc..making sure the attackers stay deep and run at the defenders inside shoulder, thereby fixing them and cutting out their option of a drift defence...it may get repetitive, but when it becomes second nature, it pays dividends..the way the game is played today means that ball retention and recycling is king..the backs must play as forwards and the forwards, backs..drills focusing on 3 or 4 players cleaning out the opposition as their ball carrying teammate goes to ground will mean quick ball, and the other players must be in position ASAP to reap the benefits..both forwards and backs must be able to do these drills i.e backs rucking and forwards positioning themselves in the traditional backs positions..again, it will seem repetitive, but it must be done, and it will become second nature..i really don't envy you, because from what i can understand, you are working alone, you are out of pocket and getting little or no structured help from the union ( compared to the game this side of the pond), but i wish you all the best and will be following this thread with interest....
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