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Old 04-21-2008, 08:46 PM   #91
Steve Rogers
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Clarence Bass has another article about recently published research which supports the view that high intensity exercise mitigates the effects of aging.

http://cbass.com/Athletes,age.htm
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Old 04-21-2008, 09:25 PM   #92
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From what I've been looking at with the neuroendocrine response article I'm writing there's a lot of anti-inflam cytokines as well which should contribute to anti-aging.

Basically, it's tons of stuff working together it seems... just like with everything.
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Old 04-22-2008, 02:39 PM   #93
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Here's a really good article, whole thing can be seen here

Couple Highlights
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The mammalian version of the yeast SIR2 gene is known as SIRT1 ("SIR2 homolog 1"). It encodes a protein, Sirt1, that has the same enzymatic activity as Sir2 but that also deacetylates a wider variety of proteins both inside the cell nucleus and out in the cellular cytoplasm. Several of these proteins targeted by Sirt1 have been identified and are known to control critical processes, including apoptosis, cell defenses and metabolism. The potential longevity-enhancing role of the SIR2 gene family seems, therefore, to be preserved in mammals. But not surprisingly in larger and more complex organisms, the pathways by which Sirtuins achieve their effect have grown considerably more complicated as well.

Increased Sirt1 in mice and rats, for example, allows some of the animals' cells to survive in the face of stress that would normally trigger their programmed suicide. Sirt1 does this by regulating the activity of several other key cellular proteins, such as p53, FoxO and Ku70, that are involved either in setting a threshold for apoptosis or in prompting cell repair. Sirt1 thus enhances cellular repair mechanisms while buying time for them to work.

Over the course of a lifetime, cell loss from apoptosis may be an important factor in aging, particularly in nonrenewable tissues such as the heart and brain, and slowing cell death may be one way Sirtuins promote health and longevity. A striking example of Sirt1's ability to foster survival in mammalian cells can be seen in the Wallerian mutant strain of mouse. In these mice, a single gene is duplicated, and the mutation renders their neurons highly resistant to stress, which protects them against stroke, chemotherapy-induced toxicity and neurodegenerative diseases.
I also used it on this post along with some other Sirt studies. Resveratol is begging to look verrrrry interesting and possiblly something worthwhile.....
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Another critical process modified by Sirt1 is inflammation, which is involved in a number of disorders, including cancer, arthritis, asthma, heart disease and neurodegeneration. Recent work by Martin W. Mayo and his colleagues at the University of Virginia has shown that Sirt1 inhibits NF-B, a protein complex that promotes the inflammatory response. The Sirt1-activating compound resveratrol has the same effect. This finding is particularly encouraging, both because the search for molecules that inhibit NF-B is a highly active area of drug development and because another well-known effect of calorie restriction is its ability to suppress excessive inflammation.
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Old 04-22-2008, 05:56 PM   #94
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Interesting article Mike. One criticism to increase cell lifespan is increased amount of time to accumulate mutations which could result in cell(s) being deregulated and becoming cancerous.

FYI Resversatrol for those of you who don't know is the good stuff in red wine which everyone is saying to drink. -_-

Last edited by Steven Low; 04-22-2008 at 05:58 PM.
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Old 04-23-2008, 07:02 AM   #95
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Originally Posted by William Hunter View Post
One topic that has not been brought up directly in this thread (though it probably falls loosely under stress reduction) is SEX, as in a healthy and fulfilling sex life (hopefully with someone, not something) and its role in longevity.

A few years ago I was trying hard to build my Chiro practice, there were 3 kids in the house(2 of them in diapers), sleep was a luxury, money was tight and my wife's and my sex life suffered. With certain needs being unfulfilled, I tended to have more late night snacks and engage in more general binge-type behavior. These were hardly my healthiest years. Now that the youngest is 4, the finances are solid etc, we have gone through a second wave of sexual giddiness and we've recently spent a lot of time (post coital) discussing how important sexual fulfillment is in one's life. Physiologically speaking, there's gotta be some good stuff happening. How much can we harm ourselves by not taking full advantage of this natural resource?

I have an old book called The Tao of Health, Sex, and Longevity that hits this topic in depth. The Taoists place sexual activity near the top of their list of priorities for a long and healthy life. Of course, the Taoists believe that while the male should have sex often, he should "preserve essence", or as the author puts it, have "contact without leakage" (LOL). This is to allow your body to redirect the sexual energy elsewhere in the body. I've never read anything that actually supports this theory, but the warm fuzzies I experience do seem to be some type of NER, not unlike a good WO.

Thoughts?
Those early Daoists were actually right that ejaculating too often affects your health because each time you ejaculate you lose about half your RDA of zinc.

Early Daoists had many theories about increasing longevity but the one that I suspect will interest most people here is the practice of bigu or abstinence from grains. There's some debate over what this actually meant because the symbol for grain is also the symbol for food so it could mean eating less carbs or simply eating less food.
My theory for the origin of this practice is that young Daoists would head off into the mountains in search of solitude where they would adopt a fairly sparse diet of roots, fruits, berries, fungi and small game (Daoist aren't required to be vegetarian) which meant they had to spend a great deal of time hiking on rough terrain. When they eventually came down from the mountain many years later they would appear much younger than their years and be far more vigorous and healthy than the peasant farmers who'd been eating a primarily grain based diet and this lead the Daoists to assume that it was their abstinence from grains that had kept them healthy.
So therein lies the Daoist secret of longevity - a nutrient dense calorie restricted low carb diet coupled with plenty of fresh air and exercise.

Finally, no discussion on longevity can be complete without mentioning the Chinese herbalist Lee Ching-yuen who was reputed to have lived to 256 years of age.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Li_Qing_Yuen

http://www.chinahand.com/qigong/a_story_of.htm
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Old 04-23-2008, 09:25 AM   #96
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Originally Posted by Steven Low View Post
Interesting article Mike. One criticism to increase cell lifespan is increased amount of time to accumulate mutations which could result in cell(s) being deregulated and becoming cancerous.

FYI Resversatrol for those of you who don't know is the good stuff in red wine which everyone is saying to drink. -_-
More wine...wooohoooo.

Good observation Steven, I believe there are also links to Sirt1 increasing cell autophagy as well:
Quote:
These results suggest that the Sirt1 deacetylase is an important in vivo regulator of autophagy and provide a link between sirtuin function and the overall cellular response to limited nutrients.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...ubmed_RVDocSum

Which would mean (I believe) that a cancerous cell (or damaged) has the ability to break itself down, consume the damaged material and then rebuild with healthy materials.

Which is what Art also talks about here
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The process seems to be triggered when the energy content of the cell declines so that the cell literally consumes itself. It goes after the damaged materials first, so there is a strong link between repair of damaged tissues and fasting or low energy state in the cell. So, it you are over-fed you down regulate cellular repair. You want to go hungy episodically to turn on cellular autophagy and repair those damaged tissues.

This makes a lot of sense from an evolutionary perspective. When the energy in the cell declines, the cell eats the damaged tissues for energy and that recycles the damaged tissues to make new material. The result is a healthier cell. It is efficient for the cell to turn to damaged materials first as a source of energy, thus sparing healthy tissues.
http://www.arthurdevany.com/2007/08/...ar_autoph.html

Either way....more wine anyone?
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Old 07-12-2008, 07:53 PM   #97
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Default The New Gymnastics by Dio Lewis

It is a long, interesting article, but he addresses needs of the common adult for his longevity and health, not his performance needs for sport. BTW, it was written in 1862.

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/186208/gymnastics

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As our artificial training is designed to fit us for the more successful performance of the duties of life, I suggest that the training should be, in character, somewhat assimilated to those duties. If you would train a horse for the carriage, you would not prepare him for this work by driving at a slow pace before a heavy load. If you did, the first fast drive would go hard with him. Just so with a man. If he is to lift hogsheads of sugar, or kegs of nails, as a business, he may be trained by heavy-lifting; but if his business requires the average activity and free motions of human occupations, then, upon the basis of his heavy, slow training, he will find himself in actual life in the condition of the dray-horse who is pushed before the light carriage at a high speed.
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Old 07-13-2008, 08:26 AM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R. Alan Hester View Post
It is a long, interesting article, but he addresses needs of the common adult for his longevity and health, not his performance needs for sport. BTW, it was written in 1862.

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/186208/gymnastics
The 1862 ipod?

Quote:
A small drum, costing perhaps five dollars, which may be used as a bass-drum, with one beating-stick, with which any one may keep time, is, I suppose, the sort of music most classes in gymnas-tics will use at first. And it has advantages. While it is less pleasing than some other instruments, it secures more perfect concert than any other. The violin and piano are excellent, but on some accounts the hand-organ is the best of all.

Feeble and apathetic people, who have little courage to undertake gymnastic training, accomplish wonders under the inspiration of music. I believe three times as much muscle can be coaxed out, with this delightful stimulus, as without it.
He was right...workout+music=intensity
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Old 07-13-2008, 09:29 AM   #99
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Wow, and I don't workout with any music at all... just silence. Gotta try it sometime o_O
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Old 07-13-2008, 11:04 AM   #100
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Interesting article about Luigi Cornaro who cured himself of illness and lived happily to 102. http://drbass.com/cornaro.html

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state of unbroken health and happiness until the age of 102. When he died, he died in an ideal way. He was in his rocking chair. He closed his eyes, took a nap, and didn't wake up. There was no pain or suffering, ever. His mind was clear as a bell until the very end, no senility, no memory loss. Indeed, one of the things he wrote about in his discourses was that his hearing and vision were perfect He retained all his senses. That's something you don't see today.
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The amount of food necessary to sustain life. Since the quantity of food needed to maintain excellent health and spirits is so small, it is rather shocking to realize that all of us, with very few exceptions, overeat and produce an endless array of miseries in our lives in both mental and physical afflictions.

The KEY to health and happiness is inextricably associated with the QUANTITY of food we consume daily.

Each morsel we consume beyond what is absolutely necessary to sustain life, wastes physical and mental energy at a fearful rate. If any single factor were to be considered as the most important for health and happiness, this would be it.
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The Two Rules for Maintaining Health and Prolonging Life: These were reduced to two things, quality and quantity.
The first, namely quality, consists in not eating foods or drinking liquids harmful to the stomach. "The second, which is quantity, consists in not eating or drinking more than the stomach can easily digest, which quantity and quality every man should be a perfect judge of by the time he is forty or fifty or sixty." .....
"I felt like singing a song after my simple meals."
sounds like CR and Quality food works....although IF works better cause you don't have to be 115lbs...or at least that's the premise of it...I'll let you know how it all turns out in another 70 years.
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