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Old 03-18-2009, 03:31 PM   #151
Mike ODonnell
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I think that can also be tied to CR and increased autophagy which is responsible for cleaning up and recycling/repairing dysfunction mitochondria....leading to more good mitochondria.

Nice find.
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Old 04-03-2009, 01:44 PM   #152
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I've been looking into this a little in terms of balancing endurance vs. strength focused exercise as you get older.

Just as the 'best' diet is not the one that has the right results under laboratory conditions, but the one you can stick to, I think the best exercise approach also depends on the practical possibilities of continuing it over the long term.

This meta-study shows that exercise in general reduces inflammatory factors. In runners in general And even in ultra-marathon runners.

But risking permanent damage or reduction in mobility because you have overdone something which is supposed to be healthy makes no sense if you end up in a worse state than if you had never exercised.

Both sets of information lead me to conclude that *performance* does not have to be any higher than that in Crossfit Seattle's skill level II, as long as you do something frequently.

And I suspect that psycho-sociologically it is easier to carry on running as you get older than lifting or gymnastics, because running culture is pretty forgiving as far as performance is concerned, the social aspects matter more, and so on.

It also occurred to me that there are a lot of dancers who have long lifespans and with high activity late in life: Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, and Maya Plisetskaya. And let's not forget yoga guru BKS Iyengar .And all those octogenarians practising tai-chi at dawn in the parks of China. No weights, no running, just gymnastic style strength and flexibility, and probably a fair amount of calorie restriction, but not so much as to reduce activity levels.
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Old 04-04-2009, 09:00 AM   #153
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I am becoming more and more a fan of bodyweight exercising. It just seems more "reasonable" in terms of what the body is going to be able to handle as I get into my 50's, 60's, 80's and beyond. Although I do love my deadlifts. I can see myself eventually evolving to a point where I do deadlifts and kettlebells as my only weighted exercises and then adding bodyweight stuff and short sprints. From what I have read, anything extreme is bad. In my mind, extreme is running anything over a mile straight (not intervals) three times a week, or putting more than 400 pounds on your shoulders.
I can illustrate the functionality of what I do. Just yesterday I started building a welding table. It will be an outdoors table so it will have to be picked up and scooted around the area rather than rolled. It ended up right about #400. I can still move it. I don't have to get my shoulders under it and squat, but it sure feels alot like a deadlift...
I may be pretty hosed up in my thought process compared to many of you all, but this is where my mind is at the moment. I have been doing IF as many days a week as I can and it REALLY has made a difference for me as well.
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Old 04-04-2009, 10:04 AM   #154
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I think we just need to look at Jack LaLanne. He can be our 95 y/o guinea pig when it comes to this topic. I'd be really interested in what his programs have looked like over the years as he's aged and what it looks like right now.
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Old 04-04-2009, 06:05 PM   #155
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I wouldn't look necessarily to LaLanne, who has given up the gymnastic/BW/calisthenic exercises that made him a star...he's now gone to a machine-based, very BBing style workout.

I'd look to the generalities of those living in the Blue Zones:
Quote:
The people inhabiting Blue Zones share common lifestyle characteristics that contribute to their longevity. Among the lifestyle characteristics shared among the Okinawa, Sardinia, and Loma Linda Blue Zones are the following:[4]

* Family - Family is put ahead of other concerns.
* No Smoking - Centenarians do not typically smoke.
* Plant-Based Diet - The majority of food consumed is derived from plants.
* Constant Moderate Physical Activity - Moderate physical activity is an inseparable part of life.
* Social Engagement - People of all ages are socially active and integrated into their communities.
* Legumes - Legumes are commonly consumed.
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Old 04-10-2009, 11:13 AM   #156
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I've read The Blue Zones and it is an excellent read overall. It's very inspiring to read about these amazing people who've lived to 100 and beyond AND maintained their health and functionality. Oprah actually did an episode on this book and Dr. Oz and Dan Buettner actually visited the blue zones. One man was 101 and was outside rigorously chopping weeds with a machete. He literally looked no older than 70 and in great shape. He was lean and muscular. It was amazing.

Anyway, to the point.........a few things that really stood out to me in the book were:

1. In all the Blue Zones it was found that overall calorie intake was between 1700 and 1900 kcals/day; these people are probably getting some of the benefits of lower calorie intake.

2. Virtually all of the very long-lived people endured great hardship at some point in their lives, whether it be famine, war, separation from family, etc. My speculation is that hardship calloused these people, making all the small things in life seem silly; they don't sweat the small stuff. I also think that hardship allows people to examine what is really important in life and focus on that and appreciate it.

3. They all have a strong sense of purpose. They have a reason to wake up everyday, whether it be an obligation to family, work, etc.

4. They all ate essentially a Weston Price-esque diet. All whole foods, grains and beans prepared to eliminate antinutrients, etc. Fermented foods, raw dairy, etc. Most of them drank alcohol, but in small quantities. Meat was generally consumed once a week in Sardinia, a few times a week in Okinawa and Nicoya, and little if ever in Limo Linda.

Buettner and his team also have discovered an island off the coast of Greece (called Ikaria I think, but not sure) that is also a Blue Zone. It should be interesting to read about that when the info is released on April 20th.
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Old 04-11-2009, 11:48 AM   #157
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Battaglia View Post
2. Virtually all of the very long-lived people endured great hardship at some point in their lives, whether it be famine, war, separation from family, etc. My speculation is that hardship calloused these people, making all the small things in life seem silly; they don't sweat the small stuff. I also think that hardship allows people to examine what is really important in life and focus on that and appreciate it.
That is very key....hence why stressors can make us stronger (if they are not chronic that is). What's the worst thing that can happen in life? You die....once you get over that fear and accept it, everything else is kind of small beans....and you can get on with appreciating what you have right now.
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Old 04-11-2009, 01:50 PM   #158
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Originally Posted by Mike ODonnell View Post
That is very key....hence why stressors can make us stronger (if they are not chronic that is). What's the worst thing that can happen in life? You die....once you get over that fear and accept it, everything else is kind of small beans....and you can get on with appreciating what you have right now.
Fear of death keeps people alive as well though. You have the Zen mentality or the run like hell mentality. They both work in many cases.
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Old 07-10-2009, 06:30 AM   #159
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Yet another study demonstrating the benefits of calorie restriction (CR) -

Quote:
Cutting calories may delay the ageing process and reduce the risk of disease, a long-term study of monkeys suggests.

The benefits of calorie restriction are well documented in animals, but now the results have been replicated in a close relative of man over a lengthy period.

Over 20 years, monkeys whose diets were not restricted were nearly three times more likely to have died than those whose calories were counted.

Writing in Science, the US researchers hailed the "major effect" of the diet.

It involved reducing calorie intake by 30% while maintaining nutrition and appeared to impact upon many forms of age-related disease seen in monkeys, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and brain atrophy.

Whether the same effects would be seen in humans is unclear, although anecdotal evidence so far suggests people on a long-term calorie-restricted diet have better cardiovascular health.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8141082.stm

................

Quote:
Calorie-Counting Monkeys Live Longer.

Rodents, yeast, and roundworms all have something in common: They live longer when they consume less. Now a primate has joined the calorie-restriction club. After 20 long years of waiting, scientists have concluded that rhesus monkeys that eat nearly a third less food than normal monkeys age more slowly. The results come as close as any can to proving that calorie restriction could significantly slow aging in humans--even if such a lean diet would not appeal to most of us.

Researchers first discovered the connection between lean diets and extended life spans in a 1935 study of calorie-restricted rats. In the past decade, studies in yeast and worms have pinpointed some genes that may be responsible. Scientists believe the genes somehow ramp up systems to protect an organism from environmental stress and may have evolved to help organisms survive in environments where food was scarce. In rodent studies, calorie restriction can extend life span by 20% to 80%. Whether calorie restriction also slows aging in primates wasn't known, however.

Two decades ago, three different research groups in the United States decided to fill this gap. The groups have previously published updates on their monkeys' health, but in tomorrow's issue of Science, one of them reports survival data from their colony of 76 rhesus monkeys. The team, led by gerontologist Richard Weindruch of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, began monitoring the animals when they hit 7 to 14 years old--monkey adulthood. Researchers allowed half of the monkeys to eat as much as they wanted during the day, while restricting the other half to a diet with 30% fewer calories. The scientists gave the restricted monkeys vitamin and mineral supplements to ensure they did not suffer malnutrition and treated any animals that fell sick, says Weindruch.

Studying aging in monkeys takes patience. Mice and rats only live for a couple of years, while these monkeys can live to 40, and the average life span is 27 years. Now that the surviving monkeys have reached their mid- to late 20s, the Wisconsin group could glean how calorie restriction was affecting their life span. Sixty-three percent of the calorie-restricted animals are still alive compared to only 45% of their free-feeding counterparts. For age-related deaths caused by illnesses such as cardiovascular disease and cancer, the voracious eaters died at three times the rate of restricted monkeys: 14 versus five monkeys, respectively. Another seven control and nine lean monkeys died from causes not related to aging such as complications from anesthesia or injuries. Leaner diets also reduced muscle and brain gray matter deterioration, two conditions associated with aging. (The team has not yet studied cognitive differences between the two groups.)
http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi...ull/2009/709/1
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Old 07-11-2009, 07:19 AM   #160
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Anorexia rules!...
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