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Old 12-12-2007, 06:16 AM   #81
Susie Rosenberg
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If you look at the picture with the broadest possible lens, you see something interesting, I think.

The broadest possible lens takes a snapshot of a country's health by capturing life expectancy; infant mortality; death rates by disease catagory, and disease incidence and prevalence.

When the United States is compared to other countries, the picture is disappointing. The U.S. Census Bureau indicates that 43 countries have life expectancies that exceed the United States, and 40 countries have a lower infant mortality rate than the United States. Even within the U.S., the states with the lowest infant mortality rates rank 25th or lower when compared to other countries. Canada, Australia, Spain, France and Germany all exceed our best state rates in terms of infant mortality.

The contributing factors to the lower life expectancy rates in the United States can be seen by comparing age-adjusted mortality rates for the United States to seven other developed countries (Canada, France, Germany, Greece, Japan, Spain and the United Kingdom). Not only does the United States have a higher mortality rate than all of these countries for ischemic heart disease; trachea, bronchitis and lung cancer; and diabetes mellitus; but additionally, the U.S. is higher than six of these seven countries for unintentional injuries, intentional injuries and neuropsychiatric conditions. (From http://www.unitedhealthfoundation.or...ml#End%20Notes)

So, let's take France and Japan and look at diet.

Japanese eat fish, white rice, vegetables, not much fat.

French people start their day with a breakfast of coffee with milk, a white flour piece of bread with butter and jam. They eat a diet relatively high in fat, including saturated fats, and drink wine daily.

Yet both traditions-vastly different traditions--spawn better national health pictures than the US.

I'm coming to the conclusion that the big issue in the US is industrialization of the food chain. That big picture snapshot shows that when people across the world leave their traditional food cultures behind and adopt US-style consumption, their disease rates rise and life expectancy drops. They get sick, US-style.

The antithesis of the US industrial diet means trying to live by the following principles:

1. Eat whole, real foods.
2. Eat local, fresh, and in season whenever possible.
3. Find a source--preferably local, that you can visit--- for grassfed meats, eggs, and dairy products that are raised without routine use of antibiotics or growth hormones.
4. Avoid buying foods from the middle of the supermarket aisles: those things with long lists of ingredients and fancy packaging. This includes organic foods that are manufactured or packaged. Organic brownies are no better for you than the regular kind.
5. Slow down: learn to eat slowly and mindfully. Enjoy your food, and the company you keep when you eat it.
6. Limit sugar. Limit sugar. Limit sugar. Limit sugar.

I honestly don't think it's necessary to balance nutrients a la The Zone; I don't think you have to eat or eschew red meat to be healthy; I don't think eating foods like barley, quinoa, buckwheat, whole oats is bad; I don't think it's necessary to eat a lot of fat--even omega 3--to be healthy; I don't think it's necessary to avoid eating a big percentage of your total calories as fat.

I think the critical element is to eat food grown in good soil, as close to harvest as possible, grassfed animal products, wild fish, and limit sugar.

Rant off.

Susie
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Old 12-12-2007, 06:34 AM   #82
Gant Grimes
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Susie, welcome to CA/PM.
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Old 12-12-2007, 07:10 AM   #83
Troy Archie
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Awesomeness and I fully agree, esp about the "industrialization of the food chain". Slow food is good.
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Old 12-12-2007, 07:42 AM   #84
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Great post Susie! So true...funny how people are looking for the magic combination of foods for longevity when some cultures eat high fat..low fat..or whatever...the common link so overlooked is no processed foods and high quality natural foods. Sugar is public enemy #1 when it comes to health...but yet industry #1 when it comes to the government and a society based on public companies and ever increasing profit. The fact that you have a "good for your heart" label on something that is processed and loaded with sugar....or that your dieticians and doctors telling people how to eat are overweight and sick....just makes for a warped sense of reality.
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Old 12-12-2007, 02:13 PM   #85
Susie Rosenberg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gant Grimes View Post
Susie, welcome to CA/PM.
Thanks, Gant. I'm here to learn something about getting stronger. Very informative site and interesting board!

Susie
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Old 12-12-2007, 03:34 PM   #86
Garrett Smith
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Yes, welcome Susie, to the forum!

Your combining of dance and CF-style GPP must leave your dance colleagues in awe at your fitness (and probably a massive reduction in injuries as well, I'd guess).
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Old 12-12-2007, 06:37 PM   #87
Susie Rosenberg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett Smith View Post
Yes, welcome Susie, to the forum!

Your combining of dance and CF-style GPP must leave your dance colleagues in awe at your fitness (and probably a massive reduction in injuries as well, I'd guess).
Oh, Geeze, Dr. G....I don't really dance anymore!

I was actually not a very good dancer, but in my late teens and early twenties, I did some summer stock theater. I was good enough to fake it in the back of the chorus line. Studied with some good teachers, though.

No, now at age 52, I'm content to do my thing: mostly cycle long distance recreationally, and have at my Crossfit workouts. These have pointed up how weak I am, especially in the upper body, so I'm approaching 2008 as the year Susie Gets Stronger.

Thanks for the welcome..

Susie
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Old 12-12-2007, 06:55 PM   #88
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Awesome stuff, Susie. I couldn't agree with you more. Welcome
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Old 02-01-2008, 08:37 AM   #89
Mike ODonnell
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long live this thread! Pardon the pun...

excellent post at MDA on longevity and muscle conection.
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/organ...le-mass-aging/
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Old 04-21-2008, 04:11 PM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert McBee View Post
DeVaney had this on his site that seems to tie in to what Robb mentioned about clearing intercellular detritus:


"Autophagy (self eating or consumption) is a crucial process in the cell. The cell consumes and recycles damaged internal material; this is an energy sparing process and important for scavenging old and damaged material within the cell.

A role for the NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirt1 in the regulation of autophagy.
Quote:
We demonstrate a role for the NAD-dependent deacetylase Sirt1 in the regulation of autophagy. In particular, transient increased expression of Sirt1 is sufficient to stimulate basal rates of autophagy.
Sirt1 being the so called "longevity" gene being touted by the science community. CR has a positive link to increases in Sirt1, forming the link to why CR increases longevity.

Should be doing a whole post on this in a day or so at the blog...but just stumbled across this study and remembered this post...that and no thread dedicated to longevity should ever have to "die off"....bad advertising....
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