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Old 03-22-2010, 07:17 AM   #1
Steven Low
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Default The fundamentals of bodyweight strength training

Finally got a primer out on purely bodyweight strength training work and/or combining bodyweight and barbell work.

The fundamentals of bodyweight strength training

Hope you enjoy. Post feedback or comments here or there.
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Old 03-22-2010, 02:26 PM   #2
Corey Cedeno
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Very good read Steve.

One question though, under Routine construction, the 60s skill work. Is that aggregate of sets or one unit?
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Old 03-22-2010, 07:12 PM   #3
Steven Low
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Aggregated sets...

Probably should mention that.
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Old 03-22-2010, 08:02 PM   #4
Júlíus G. Magnússon
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Haven't read through the whole thing, yet, Just wanted to point out, you should probably copy all the pictures to your own server. All your pics seem to be directly linked to someone else's server, and all they need to do is remove them and you'll have a broken image in your article. At least one seems to be broken right now.

Also, just a typo I thought I should point out:

"full back lever and full back lever– images from drillsandskills.com and 128.pair.com"

One of the pics shows a back lever and the other front lever.

Looks like a good read, and I'll definitely be giving it a much closer look when gymnastics movements become more of a priority for me (when my stupid elbow stops being a pussy).

By the way, you mentioned phosphatidylserine in your log. Just wanted to say I'm very interested in your thoughts on that. So definitely make that your next article.
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Old 03-22-2010, 08:13 PM   #5
Steven Low
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Yeah, I'll probably try to get on that tomorrow (the pics).

It was easier hotlinking for now. :\ Gonna take a few hours which SUCKS.


I'm definitely gonna start working on the PS... but I have 4 other things in queue right now that I'm like 50% done with so it may get put on the backburner for a bit.

We'll see.
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Old 03-23-2010, 01:13 AM   #6
Grissim Connery
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since julius brought up typos, here's another

"Skill development for bodyweight strength training is much different than barbell work.

It is unlike most of the barbell movements where you can start to learn the most complex movements as a beginner such as the clean and jerk and snatch within a couple months of starting.

It is unlike barbell training where you can begin learning the more complex movements (such as the Olympic lifts – snatch and clean and jerk), as a beginner and reach a decent level of proficiency within a few months. In fact, with barbell work this is preferable because it allows for years upon years of meticulous training to reinforce proper movement patterns to do it under heavy loads."

so far though it's great!
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Old 03-23-2010, 05:16 PM   #7
Gavin Harrison
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I like the ideas and stunts of bodyweight training, but honestly, I doubt I'm built for it, being tall (6') with long limbs. I'm probably best suited for the deadlift, maybe strongman if I can gain some weight...
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Old 03-23-2010, 06:06 PM   #8
Steven Low
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That's why you can work it in partially.
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Old 03-23-2010, 09:37 PM   #9
Grissim Connery
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I hadn't really considered the manna to be the opposite of a handstand before. That was a really interesting concept. i'm restructuring my workouts now with that idea in mind

One thing i felt as i read it and i've also always had issues with is classifying the back lever. it definately makes sense that it's a flexion, but then then it seems strange to call it a pull. but then again, manna is considered extension and it is more like a push than a pull. i guess once you go behind the back, a push is a pull and a pull is a push.

what about bridge work?
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Old 03-23-2010, 10:19 PM   #10
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Yeah, I thought there would be a bit of confusion about that. I didn't really specify so here's my breakdown of it:


I consider it a pull namely because

1. your are "pulling" your center of mass towards your hands
2. the main muscle engaged are primarily "pulling" muscles -- lats, biceps, etc. (though some chest, minimal anterior delts)

Like I said, there some that are in the grey area... back lever is one of them. Manna is definitely another -- most people see it as a pushing (and it is in the sense of the "strict center of mass away from your hands" concept).

I classify it as pulling since it works shoulder extension extensively in the movement.

Although back lever is flexion, it does not engage the anterior delts sufficiently that I would put it in the pushing category.

Quote:
i guess once you go behind the back, a push is a pull and a pull is a push.
Yeah, I considered adding this (because I noticed it too)... but the article is already long enough and I don't want to confuse anyone further. :\

-----------

bridge is under the development of low back flexibility -- Coach Sommer has articles on that which I linked to.
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