Home   |   Contact   |   Help

Get Our Newsletter
Sign up for our free newsletter to get training tips and stay up to date on Catalyst Athletics, and get a FREE issue of the Performance Menu journal.

Go Back   Catalyst Athletics Forums > Training > Combat Sports

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-24-2010, 04:48 AM   #21
Greg Davis
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 332
Default

Geez forget that idea.. went back in to my BJJ gym after a bit of a hiatus and was not impressed to see they ripped out the weight room section to make more room for muay thai classes..

Erg!
__________________
homepage: gregdavis.ca
Greg Davis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2010, 06:00 AM   #22
Mark Joseph Limbaga
Member
 
Mark Joseph Limbaga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 87
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Davis View Post
Hey guys what are your thoughts on fitting the 5/3/1 workouts in around BJJ training as far as timing?

I prefer to go in for a separate session but as far as scheduling it is sometimes super convenient to hit a heavy weight and then go to a class. I go to 1 hour morning BJJ classes at my gym which thank god are more focused on technique and not running around doing a million high rep sets for "cardio".

Of course it depends on how intense the class is so that can be an unpredictable variable, but IMO as long as you aren't overdoing it, a 5/3/1 session on the brief side then a BJJ class can work out well.

Thoughts/experiences?
I always preferred to lift before training...

the #1 rule: listen to your body
Mark Joseph Limbaga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 09:38 AM   #23
Grissim Connery
Senior Member
 
Grissim Connery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 624
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Joseph Limbaga View Post
I always preferred to lift before training...
if i can lift several hours before training, then i prefer this. if it's lifting and then going straight into class, then i don't like this at all. if that's the case, then working out after class is fine too. in general i find that i have less pressure to condition after class since i feel like i probably already conditioned just by training. therefore, i can just focus on strength and skill work. granted though, i normally don't expect great performance cause i'm probably tired.

i do feel though that after working on strength and skill after training for a while does make me much more capable when i do come into a fresh workout session without training beforehand.

it's more reasonable to me to train after class because most people are training at the 6-8pm times anyways, and if you have a normal workday, then there's no good free time beforehand. that is unless you workout in the morning, but that just makes my back hurt.

if you train at noon or so, and then workout in the evening, that would probably be ideal. although my guess would be that if you feel up to it, you should train both at noon and in the evening and only workout if you don't have the energy (although that may sound weird).
Grissim Connery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2010, 09:06 AM   #24
Robb Wolf
Senior Member
 
Robb Wolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,444
Default

Great thread. Wanted to ask folks, why a 531 template (sticking with base moves for long-ish duration) vs a MEBB approach of rotating the strength work. Let's say something like Gant's program, but in lieu of 531, a rotating battery of ME moves?
__________________
"Survival will be neither to the strongest of the species, nor to the most intelligent, but to those most adaptable to change."
C. Darwin

Robb's Blog
Robb Wolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 10:53 AM   #25
Grissim Connery
Senior Member
 
Grissim Connery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 624
Default

I've been more wiped out recently after training. This has made S&C after class harder. i'd still like to work out after class, but need to find a way to put forth the energy. anybody have tips other than trucker drugs and blow?

i thought of drinking a dextrose drink and waiting an hour. the only problem is that waiting starts to push later into the night, and then i start to impinge on my girlfriend's patience.
Grissim Connery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 10:56 AM   #26
Grissim Connery
Senior Member
 
Grissim Connery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 624
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robb Wolf View Post
Great thread. Wanted to ask folks, why a 531 template (sticking with base moves for long-ish duration) vs a MEBB approach of rotating the strength work. Let's say something like Gant's program, but in lieu of 531, a rotating battery of ME moves?
i think 531 just takes less thinking. i'm not saying it's dumb, but more of the fact that when you're worn out from training, switching exercises seems oddly fatiguing on the mind.
Grissim Connery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2010, 01:30 PM   #27
Derek Simonds
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Deland, FL
Posts: 4,231
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robb Wolf View Post
Great thread. Wanted to ask folks, why a 531 template (sticking with base moves for long-ish duration) vs a MEBB approach of rotating the strength work. Let's say something like Gant's program, but in lieu of 531, a rotating battery of ME moves?
I agree with Grissim about the simplicity and not having to think about it. I program a month in advance, post the excel spreadsheet in my gym and I am done other than showing up.

The other part is three-fold. I get a real clear indication of my level of overtraining / underrecovering from the workouts. With very linear numbers on the same lifts week over week I know exactly how I am tracking and can compensate accordingly. If I feel I am starting to push too far I will cut out the accessory work. If I need to I will only strength train 2 days a week. Lots of flexibility for me to work within this framework without having to give it too much attention. Secondly I am truly a linear person, Knowing up front every day what lifts and numbers I need to hit for the set and rep scheme just works for me. The last part is that I have had the most significant gains ever using this protocol so my own little 5/3/1 BB has definitely passed.

I know that there is a ton of flexibility in the MEBB approach. I watch Coach Rut in my google reader all the time and like the MEBB approach. I am sure if I programmed it a month in advance with actual numbers I could get the same results, just haven't been that motivated to try it since I have been having good success with the 5/3/1

Robb I thought about my reply a lot and hope that it is clear enough.
__________________
What we think, or what we know, or what we believe, is in the end, of little consequence. The only thing of consequence is what we do. -John Ruskin

http://westvolusiawellness.com/
Derek Simonds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2010, 01:21 PM   #28
Robb Wolf
Senior Member
 
Robb Wolf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,444
Default

Guys-
I really appreciate the time, and yes, Derek, very clear.

it's funny, I program for others all the time but now that I'm rolling again and looking towards tournaments I need a handle on my own training. I'll sketch out what I'm up to and get y'alls input.
__________________
"Survival will be neither to the strongest of the species, nor to the most intelligent, but to those most adaptable to change."
C. Darwin

Robb's Blog
Robb Wolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2010, 02:32 PM   #29
Gant Grimes
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,373
Default

Robb, I like 531 for the reasons others mentioned. There's nothing to overthink, so you can cut the trainee loose. It's useful for novices or intermediates, and the use of one heavy workset doesn't burn you out like sets across in a linear program. The AMRAP set also dovetails into other conditioning work better than a limit strength program does.

I'd do something different if I was coaching and programming for a specific trainee (assuming I was also familiar with his technique work). It would look more like my old stuff or like Rut's. But there is a lot of wiggle room, which means a lot of opportunities for an ignorant trainee to screw up the program. Not as much with 531.

For the spring season, I toyed with a combination of 531 (which I nixed closer to tourney time), timed sets on the KBs, Dan John's barbell complexes, and prowler work. I liked it a lot.

Also check Joel Jamieson's stuff.
__________________
"It should be more like birthday party than physics class." | Log | 70's Big
Gant Grimes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2010, 11:20 PM   #30
Anton Emery
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 145
Default

Good thread. I think all the approaches mentioned are valid, depending on the individual. After some starting and stopping I am back to following Joel Jamieson's program laid out in his book. I figure he coached most of the Pride roster, so its at least worth a shot and i can see how i respond. The aerobic phase has been interesting, basically just keeping the heart rate between 120-150 for 30-90 min. For that I have been mostly been doing various things around the gym, practicing wrestling shots, BJJ drills, some gymnastics stuff, anything to keep my HR up for the allotted amount of time.

Hopefully i can stick to this. In the past i have tended to jump from one fitness goal to the other, as i see fellow gym members become better O-lifters, or get better at gymnastics. I see them do it and i want to do it too, when in reality i need to train for my sport of juijitsu.


Anton
Anton Emery is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:39 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Subscribe to our Newsletter


Receive emails with training tips, news updates, events info, sale notifications and more.
ASK GREG

Submit your question to be answered by Greg Everett in the Performance Menu or on the website

Submit Your Question
WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM

Catalyst Athletics is a USA Weightlifting team of competitive Olympic-style weightlifters with multiple national team medals.

Read More
Olympic Weightlifting Book
Catalyst Athletics
Contact Us
About
Help
Newsletter
Products & Services
Gym
Store
Seminars
Weightlifting Team
Performance Menu
Magazine Home
Subscriber Login
Issues
Articles
Workouts
About the Program
Workout Archives
Exercise Demos
Text Only
Instructional Content
Exercise Demos
Video Gallery
Free Articles
Free Recipes
Resources
Recommended Books & DVDs
Olympic Weightlifting Guide
Discussion Forum
Weight Conversion Calculator