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Old 07-20-2010, 01:24 PM   #21
Leon Robotham
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Power Snatch Heavy

80k.

This felt pretty fast and snappy. It actually felt a lot better than my recent snatch attempts, probably not suffering any paralysis by analysis.
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Old 07-21-2010, 03:16 PM   #22
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BJJ

Warmed up with some jogging, rolls and crawls of different variety.

after the warm-up we paired off and drilled a couple of variations of the double-leg takedown. The first one was with two rigid arms behind the legs and the second was with the legs wrapped. We kept drilling this for a good portion of the class, the coaches were making a point of a rapin change in levels and an accurate shot. Once we'd covered this with a completely compliant, non-engaging partner we included some grip fighting. I was getting pretty caught up with trying to hand fight and win a grip with my right hand (i'm an orthodox) and Hywel said it would be better to simply guide the arm up to create space for a good shot. It worked really well.

The next drill was a follow up from the double-leg. With the leg wrap, almost in side control we were to scoot up a little and place the outside leg under both of the legs. Then we removed the outer arm and pinched the hips with your elbow. The outside arm was now up the length of the opponents body, palm facing up with firm pressure. This was basically to stop him from turning into you for an escape attempt and to buy a little time so that we could secure side control. To finish we simply take the other arm and take a head control and the same time clearing the arm and taking a gable grip.

Head and arm control from side. From this position we drilled the key lock when your partner was being silly and waving his hand infront of your face.

Time seemed to have passed us by so we didn't do any isolation rounds and went straight into sparring. It was hellishly hot and humid again in the gym, we were all tired so everybody was using good jiu-jitsu and not relying on power. I sparred with Hywel, Aldo ( the 120kg+ 6ft beast) and Owen who's had a lot of time off the mat recently. Rolling with Hywel was great, I think the other coach forgot to stop the round and we ended up going for about 8-10 minutes. It felt like 20! My lower body was working really well and I managed to escape and ezekiel and a gable choke twice, granted I was given a jiu-jitsu clinic but afterwards Hywel said that my neck was pretty big and he struggled with it. I managed to escape a lot of bad positions and also managed to take his back with hooks in but couldnt finish. I ended up getting choked with a gi choke of some sort right on the buzzer

Next up was rolling with Aldo, this just plain sucks but luckily for me he was really bloody tired because of the heat so little strength was being used. I say little but little for him is still a lot... It was ok, he played on the bottom to start and worked to mount, but I escaped when he went in for the choke. Finished off the round taking his back and getting the tap with a gable choke.

Rolling with Owen I played a pretty passive game to allow him to dust the cobwebs off and get some work in without having too much to think about. It was a good roll, i tried to keep using my hands to a minimum and focused on an active lower body and hips. Also managed to get a gable choke.

I've been managing to take the back on a lot of guys across different belts lately. My closed guard game is pretty poor and i'm working on it a lot, I'm a fairly big and strong guy so was advised early on not to get in the habit of shutting shop and not allowing other guys to do jiu-jitsu. Because of that I always tend to play an open guard or BFG. My technique for taking the back is to allow my opponent to kind of break my guard, most people go for the basic knee in the middle technique. With a sleeve and collar grip (not deep) I let them get to a combat base and then spin out to the side and put a hook in like De-la Riva. From here I switch my grips and take the arm with the collar grip and take hold of the arm I had while using the arm that had the sleev grip to grab the belt. All the time here i'm pushing and pulling to test their base ( I'm off to the side here with a belt and sleeve grip with my legs kind of scissored around my opponent, the leg thats in front of him i scoot round to the back and hook. To take the back with a smaller guy i'll just kick forward and they drop right into position. For a bigger guy its part pulling him down and pulling me up.

Tonight was a really good session for me, i've had a couple of sessions where I felt as though I was taking a backward step but it's all good for now.
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Old 07-22-2010, 02:23 PM   #23
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Deload deads 40-50-60 %

90-112.5-135

10 minutes prowler walk 150kg. Floor has minimal friction hence the load, but it was still a suckfest. No stopping. Ankles, calves and shoulders were burning during and afterwards.
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Old 07-23-2010, 03:28 AM   #24
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I have never taken the back from de la riva. I understand completely what you are doing and find it amusing that I haven't done that before. I have done a similar pass from standing but never on the ground. Glad I read that. I get de la riva all the time. At the state championships this year I won my last match with 2 points from a de la riva sweep. I couldn't pass the guy once I swept him but got the 2 for the win.

I also have been working on taking the back from the guard. Most of my techniques are derivatives of Roger Gracie (I am not quite as tall but not far off in total size) moves. I had a private and worked on them for an hour.

I can now take the back from closed guard using a simple grip. It turns out that the grip is the key part. You loosen the gi on the right side, sit up into your opponent and reach around their back with your left hand and grab under their right armpit. Ideally with your right hand you pass their gi to your left hand and you can grab it tight right under their armpit. From there just lay back to your right side open guard and use your right leg to push their right knee away and pull them back into you with your left arm. Voila great back control.

I am enjoying the blog. You ought to do a shameless plug in the fighting section or at least here in your log.
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Old 07-23-2010, 04:16 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Simonds View Post
I have never taken the back from de la riva. I understand completely what you are doing and find it amusing that I haven't done that before. I have done a similar pass from standing but never on the ground. Glad I read that. I get de la riva all the time. At the state championships this year I won my last match with 2 points from a de la riva sweep. I couldn't pass the guy once I swept him but got the 2 for the win.

I also have been working on taking the back from the guard. Most of my techniques are derivatives of Roger Gracie (I am not quite as tall but not far off in total size) moves. I had a private and worked on them for an hour.

I can now take the back from closed guard using a simple grip. It turns out that the grip is the key part. You loosen the gi on the right side, sit up into your opponent and reach around their back with your left hand and grab under their right armpit. Ideally with your right hand you pass their gi to your left hand and you can grab it tight right under their armpit. From there just lay back to your right side open guard and use your right leg to push their right knee away and pull them back into you with your left arm. Voila great back control.

I am enjoying the blog. You ought to do a shameless plug in the fighting section or at least here in your log.
I find it really natural to take the back from de la riva but depending on who i'm rolling with it can be tough to get the second hook in. If you're a points player then you'd only get the advantage I think, but you still have a lot of submission and transition opportunities. For you it will be a good technique because as i'm a lowly 2 stripe white belt i'm still figuring a lot out. I'm beginning to analyse less and do more, things are becoming more natural but I just don't have a big arsenal.

Did you see the Braulio technique on the blog? Is the grip that you're talking about that one but with an underhook? I'm thinking the overhook so that the arm doesnt base or resist... I think i'm with you.

Glad that you're liking the blog, can you think of anything else that could be put up to make it better?
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Old 07-23-2010, 06:06 AM   #26
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I just watched the video. The grip is exactly what I am talking about the difference is the direction you move your opponents arm. In the video you wouldn't be able to move to the back because he can block you with his right arm. The way I do it is to pop the right arm across his body and move to the same grip. Does that make sense? I have 3 different setups I work to get the arm across but that is the key, the arm has to be across the body so you can get around them.

The second variation he did where he underhooked the arm and grabbed cross collar is one of my all time favorite control moves from guard. I have never seen the triangle from there before and will drill that this coming week.

When you say gable choke are you talking about a baseball choke? BJJ has some crappy naming conventions so it is hard to have a discussion when you are saying the same thing but thinking different moves.

Here is a link for a no-gi version http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KlXBd9VAcM I use a gable grip anytime I do this choke not the way he is grabbing.
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Old 07-23-2010, 09:36 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Simonds View Post
I just watched the video. The grip is exactly what I am talking about the difference is the direction you move your opponents arm. In the video you wouldn't be able to move to the back because he can block you with his right arm. The way I do it is to pop the right arm across his body and move to the same grip. Does that make sense? I have 3 different setups I work to get the arm across but that is the key, the arm has to be across the body so you can get around them.

The second variation he did where he underhooked the arm and grabbed cross collar is one of my all time favorite control moves from guard. I have never seen the triangle from there before and will drill that this coming week.

When you say gable choke are you talking about a baseball choke? BJJ has some crappy naming conventions so it is hard to have a discussion when you are saying the same thing but thinking different moves.

Here is a link for a no-gi version http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KlXBd9VAcM I use a gable grip anytime I do this choke not the way he is grabbing.
That makes perfect sense. I think a setup that might work for me would be after loosing the gi to go for a collar choke with the right hand in first. Threathen the choke with the other hand and if they go to break the grip quickly pull them in with the right arm and leg. Hopefully this will trap the arm between our chests and I can secure the grip to begin the transition.

What was I thinking? I was referring to the cradle choke I think... The grip I use to stay on the back before attacking is the gable grip. It was late when I typed that sorry. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWTd705t1oc at 2.29 in this video Andre Galvao does the choke.
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Old 07-25-2010, 03:58 AM   #28
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Friday.

I trained with the pro team. Thought it was a no-gi BJJ class but it turned out to be a focussed sparring session. We did about 8 rounds of Muay Thai, shoot-boxing, wrestling and then finished off the session with some rolling. Although I haven't thai boxed in about a year I was still able to control the pace and work at distance. The shoot-boxing was a different story, my upright tha style doesn't convert well to MMA so I got taken down quite a lot until I started to sink down in a boxers stance and throw leg instead f body kicks. My shooting ability is pretty poor but after several crappy telegraphed attempts and failures I managed to bait on of the lads in walking backwards then quickly changed levels, shot and got the takedown, happy with that one takedown even though I got levelled. Suprisingly the wrestling went well and I had fun. I finished off getting a few rounds with Kafui who has a fight coming up and fairing quite well, and then with Ian. Now that our class has grown I don't get as much time to roll with Ian, but every time I do he puts on a jiu-jitsu clinic. At 56kg and a 2 stripe brown belt to my 90 he just takes the p*ss, I learn how to tap a lot, but I know what not to do next time around.

Fun class but i'm done with taking knocks and bumps from elbows,shins and knees and getting punched in the face.

Saturday

BJJ

Warmed up with shrimping, crawls, rolls, breakfalls, partner hip-up things.. and flipping from one side control to the other.

BFG passes were the focus of the technique section for this session. The first pass was to get in nice and close to nulify the hooks and pinch the hips with our elbows, from there mule kick on leg up and back then bring it back in to stuff one of their hooks across your hips. Secure a deep underhook, spawl hips to the floor, walk round and sit to kesa gatame then switch to a deep side control with the arm trapped high. On the next pass you had an underhook but you just sprawled off to one side and worked round to finish like the first variation. Finally we were to wrap the legs and put your head to one side of your opponent on the mat and spring over to side control.

After working those techniques we were to work them in isolastion with your partner giving about 50-60% resistance. I couldn't get the mule kick to work for me as written with a resisting partner, my flexibility needs work. To make it work for me from the safe position, hips tucked I reached underneath and grabbed the hook that I didn't want to hook, kicked back and then trapped the leg. It worked well. For the one where we sprawled off to the side sometimes it worked and other times I got caught in half guard. The last one for me worked well but felt pretty sloppy.

The sparring session was good, I got to work with people who are about my level so was able to try things i'd been wanting to work on. First thing on the agenda was a simple sweep from guard when the opponent attempts to pass. With a collar and sleeve control you kick one leg up while bridging the hips up and over landing in the mount, it's simple but was working well for me. I'm going to focus on a couple of things every week to help improve my closed guard game. Next was the first triangle from the braulio video on our blog I got all the way to the triangle after a few hip adjustments I couldn't get it closed properly.

I tried to take the back using your technique Derek and I can see how it will work but my set-up for getting the arm trapped wouldn't have worked without being forcefull and i'm trying to let things flow on the mat.
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Old 07-26-2010, 01:36 PM   #29
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Burgener Warm-up

Power Snatch
50-50-60-60-70-70-80

Back Squat 5-5-5+ 5-3-1 Cycle 7 week 1. (repeated cycle 4 after a BJJ comp)

123.5-142.5-161.

3x10 pull-ups between sets. My strict pull-ups are getting stronger.

5x10 GHR
5x10 Barbell Shrugs, 80k. Too light.
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Old 07-27-2010, 03:58 AM   #30
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The easiest way to use that technique is to just sit up at the same time you pull your opponent forward with your hips and pin the arm you are going to reach around in between you and him. It is an explosive move but you aren't just horsing them around.
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