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Old 08-18-2010, 06:51 AM   #41
John Alston
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I am with Allen on this. Esp since I agree with the anecdotal than increasing protein above the need level of 1g - 1lb can have good effects based on my own exp.
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Old 08-18-2010, 10:38 AM   #42
Gant Grimes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Allen Yeh View Post
What I was saying is that it seems silly to me that Darryl was advocating the "calorie is a calorie" idea after meeting 1.8/2g/kg of protein. Especially if you are talking about on a daily basis and not just a one shot deal.

So if a 200 lb guy was training hard and met his protein needs with 164 grams of protein. which is 1.8g per kg. I can't possibly see him getting the same results as adding 400 calories from a chicken breast as adding 400 calories of straight up sugar. Especially if we are talking about for months on end. This is assuming the rest of his diet stays the same and the only thing is changing is taking away his extra protein and adding in 400 calories from sugar.
The skinny guys in extra medium lab coats disagree with you, Allen.

Again, no offense to anyone, but sitting at 220, guys my size and bigger aren't going to get it done with 1.8g/kg. I wish it were not so, as it would be much cheaper.
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Old 08-18-2010, 11:14 AM   #43
John Alston
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As does skinny Martin leangains, eating +1lb of beef after a workout. I shouldn't say skinny, since he can pull close to 600...
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Old 09-16-2010, 01:54 AM   #44
Paul Epstein
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Originally Posted by Darryl Shaw View Post
The protein requirements of strength athletes in regular training are 1-1.4g/kg/d which is only slightly greater than that of the general population and is easily met by almost any diet that provides adequate calories.
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Originally Posted by Darryl Shaw View Post
However as protein in excess of 1.8-2g/kg/d is oxidized to provide energy all that additional meat is doing really is providing the extra calories required for growth.
im confused by the discrepancy here. you say that only 1.4g/kg/d is required but then excess above 2g/kg/d is simply used as excess calories...

what happens between 1.4 to 2 g/kg/d?
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Old 09-16-2010, 07:14 AM   #45
John Alston
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That mediocre level encouraged mediocre results.
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Old 09-17-2010, 04:24 AM   #46
Darryl Shaw
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Originally Posted by Paul Epstein View Post
im confused by the discrepancy here. you say that only 1.4g/kg/d is required but then excess above 2g/kg/d is simply used as excess calories...

what happens between 1.4 to 2 g/kg/d?
There is no discrepancy, protein in excess of requirements is oxidised to provide energy.

If for example a bodybuilder or strength/power athlete ate 1.6gPRO/kg/d when they only required 1.2g/kg/d then 0.4g/kg/d of protein would be broken down to provide energy.

I think what you're missing here though is that people such as elite endurance athletes, pregnant or lactating women, children/teenagers, the elderly, people with low energy intakes etc may require up to 2gPRO/kg/d which is far in excess of what any bodybuilder or strength/power athlete in regular training would need.
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Old 03-20-2012, 12:22 AM   #47
Jack Alan
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Protein is the basic key to maintain health and get weight. Protein can be get from many foods items like fruits, vegetables, meat, fish and chicken etc.
these are help full to get weight according to your desire.
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Old 07-12-2012, 03:10 AM   #48
Adrian Lloyd
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Default whey protein?

I have heard that Whey Protein is quite a good supplement in building mass. But if you take my advice then i may suggest you to try Creatine supplement in developing a good stamina in addition to building a good muscle.

Many people have benefited from this supplement and you must also try this.
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Old 08-01-2013, 12:33 AM   #49
Hall James
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Hi Daniel,
Whey proteins is great to lose and maintain weight, improve immunity system and improves memory. Whey protein helps in reducing elevated blood pressure, improves mood in stressful situations and to sooth stress.
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Old 11-16-2013, 06:56 AM   #50
David Sharad
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Whey protein powder is mostly used in bodybuilding. It include vitamins, mineral, nutrients, iron and protein that are good to improve fitness, boost energy, build stamina, make strong muscles and improve physical performance.
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