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Old 08-14-2010, 09:09 PM   #11
Jarod Barker
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I have no idea if these numbers are good or bad, but

WBC: 4.5
Platelets: 146
MPV: 11.6

I think those are the CBC numbers? I have a ton of paperwork and bloodwork here, and admittedly, I don't really know what I should be looking for.
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Old 08-15-2010, 07:57 AM   #12
Garrett Smith
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WBC are definitely low for my ranges, if I recall off the top of my head (I'm at home right now), your platelets are low as well. Note I mean functional (some would say "optimal") ranges, NOT the lab ranges.

As I mentioned before, if you want my help in working on this, PM me or contact my office, the necessary info is in my sig.
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Old 08-15-2010, 08:09 AM   #13
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Sorry, I missed seeing this post.
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Originally Posted by Chad Cilli View Post
Thank you Garrett, you're spot on with your assessment. My cholesterol was screwed up, and I thought that was unusual. My total was 222, triglycerides were 109, HDL was 44, and LDL was 156. I've never had bad cholesterol levels in my life, so I just thought it was a fluke.
Not a fluke. It fits the pattern. It will rectify with proper approaches. If I were you, I would NOT go on a statin for this.

Quote:
My free testosterone was 10.0, but the doc kept repeating the 427 number as his reasoning for wanting me to use testosterone. I can't help being skeptical though, because if I sign on for a lifetime of testosterone injections, that's money in his bank account, so no offense to any doctors, but I kind second guess whether or not his advice is in my best interest. Like I said, I'm 26, so I'm not exactly eager to start down a path of TRT as it would really interfere with my personal goals for my life.
You are young and doing (mostly) healthy things for yourself, other than your excessive exercise. IMO, testosterone should be last on your list right now.
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My baseline cortisol level was 24.010 ug/dL which they said was high. However, they were unable to diagnose anything like Cushing's or Addison's. So, maybe that did have some role to play in my recent fractures. I don't know if that level ever came back down.
This high cortisol level means that your training is over-the-top for you at this time.
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What's strange to me is everything was going great and I was progressing from September to December, and then everything just seemed so abrupt. With the back to back flus, the fractured tibia, the bloodwork issues with cortisol, and then the fractured metatarsals and ligament tears, I've barely been able to get any sustained training in. Shouldn't the time off from the flus and then the time off from the fractured tibia been enough time for my body to have recovered?
What you experienced was the "calm before the storm". Progress for four months followed by a major crash means that what you were doing is not sustainable for you right now, maybe not ever. Hour-long CF workouts done one or more times a week will ruin nearly anyone who has any other types of responsibilities (job, family, post-grad studies, etc.). The flus were a sign that you needed a lot more time off and easier training, not just the time you took off for feeling sick. You ignored the signs your body was trying to give you.
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Forgive for whining "why me" but I can't understand how it could be that other guys are still following the programming, and somehow I became overtrained. What is the difference that allowed them to continue training while I'm muddling through problems?
People's stress levels and ability to deal with stress is both built by nature and nurture. I can't sprint as fast as Tyson Gay, I realize this, and I deal with what I was dealt. I don't tolerate much training stress well. I used to get a cold like clockwork if I trained 5 weeks straight. I don't get sick anymore now that I follow 5/3/1 and actually take the deload week more like a week "off". This is a learning experience for you.
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I'm seeing another doc with the Steelers on Monday, but I may contact you for a consult. I'm not particularly pleased with the recommendations and advice I'm getting from these doctors.
I'm not surprised. Don't expect much.
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Old 08-15-2010, 08:51 AM   #14
Jarod Barker
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Hey Garrett, thanks for the info, I'm not going to bother waiting till Monday to start this ball rolling. PM inbound, thanks!
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Old 08-18-2010, 03:52 PM   #15
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lack of periodization, lack of Down-time, too much volume, too much intensity....

I do 5-10 consults per week on this. if we can a correlation between my client list and CF games competitors (past & present) folks would find it interesting.

People need to wise-the-fuck-up on this topic.
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Old 08-18-2010, 08:11 PM   #16
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Heard today that in shitty boxes, injury rates are ~70% and in good boxes they are around 30%.

How do those numbers look? There seems to be a big issue with sweeping injury rates under the table.

I do know that in a local Crossfit based bootcamp business, the idiot has untrained, overweight women running distances (1-2 miles) on concrete and asphalt and that many of the develop, at the minimum, shin splints. One developed stress fractures. In my mind, this is almost a criminal prescription, not to mention a lazy way (for the trainer) to program activity.
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Old 08-19-2010, 04:10 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Shafley View Post
Heard today that in shitty boxes, injury rates are ~70% and in good boxes they are around 30%.

How do those numbers look? There seems to be a big issue with sweeping injury rates under the table.

I do know that in a local Crossfit based bootcamp business, the idiot has untrained, overweight women running distances (1-2 miles) on concrete and asphalt and that many of the develop, at the minimum, shin splints. One developed stress fractures. In my mind, this is almost a criminal prescription, not to mention a lazy way (for the trainer) to program activity.
Awesomeness.....
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Old 08-19-2010, 07:02 AM   #18
Geoffrey Thompson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Shafley View Post
Heard today that in shitty boxes, injury rates are ~70% and in good boxes they are around 30%.

How do those numbers look? There seems to be a big issue with sweeping injury rates under the table.
Well... it's hard to tell how those injury rates look. I've heard stats bandied about concerning the injury rates for recreational runners that are also around 70%. I agree that they're high, especially of the species "stupid injuries you shouldn't get", but it's really hard to get a good baseline. I think we'd all agree, though, that if it's 70% when it could be 30%, there's some malpractice going on. The boot camp example is egregious. But it's hard to tell if 30% is good or bad. I'm pretty much always on the brink of tendinitis in some joint or other, it might flare up to an actual case of it every year or two. That sounds like an injury rate of 50%. I suspect a lot of lifters are the same, if not worse, though I consider myself fairly "injury free".
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Old 08-19-2010, 09:38 AM   #19
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I think I read in a book on running injuries that 90% of recreational runners will suffer an injury in any given year. Now, to keep that in perspective, I imagine to get a number that high they're taking every little injury from a mild sprain to a herniated disc, but in any case, running definitely "causes" many injuries.

Perhaps, the POSE community has the right idea in teaching running as a skill. I've had years of coaching on proper bench press and squatting technique, and I have not sustained an injury from bench pressing or squatting. Even when working with weights beyond my 1 rep max, I've learned how to safely miss a lift. However, I've had but one weekend of running instruction.

Robb, we've talked about this multiple times. I think as an athlete, especially a highly motivated athlete working towards a goal, there is a certain unexplainable willingness to follow a coach's programming. I realize that training for health and fitness is something that needs to be adjusted carefully, shorter met cons, more focus on strength work, more recovery time.

But how should one prepare for "endurance" type training schools like SFAS, Ranger School, RIP, Q course, BUD/S, etc.? Is there a certain level of overtraining that would provide sort of a "hormesis" to protect the body during those courses? Is it even possible to avoid overtraining while going through such a course?

I know Poliquin has spoken about what he calls "super accumulation" where you overtrain purposely and then when you take time off your body over compensates and you supposedly gain more strength, endurance, etc than you could on a linear training plan, but I've never witnessed nor experienced that.
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Old 08-19-2010, 12:40 PM   #20
Garrett Smith
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Chad,
There is a key difference between CF's approach to training and *everyone* else's.

Everyone else does the same types of training over and over again, with small & gradual changes, allowing the body to adapt.

CF's intention is to not let the body adapt. Thus every workout is seen by the body as a new, different stressor...and the body is always off balance...this is perceived as a much greater stressor and is potentially not able to adapt over time past a certain point. Not allowing for adaptation means that the body's stress machinery also never adapts (see below).

This is why no one else in the world does "random" programming. It is too hard on the body over time.

Here are some examples from a recently linked site on CF.com on stress, which I find humorous as it would seem to explain why the stress response to CF isn't like that of other programs. Note the part about stress and digestion--you would be amazed how many CFers eat "perfect Paleo" and yet are still dealing with stress-induced IBS that goes away when they start training in a more sensible manner.

http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/0...ess_cure/all/1
Quote:
One of the most tragic aspects of the stress response is the way it gets hardwired at a young age — an early setback can permanently alter the way we deal with future stressors. The biological logic of this system is impeccable: If the world is a rough and scary place, then the brain assumes it should invest more in our stress machinery, which will make us extremely wary and alert. There’s also a positive feedback loop at work, so that chronic stress actually makes us more sensitive to the effects of stress.

--

Stress is a chemistry problem. When people feel stressed, a tiny circuit in the base of their brain triggers the release of glucocorticoids, a family of stress hormones that puts the body in a heightened state of alert. The molecules are named after their ability to rapidly increase levels of glucose in the blood, thus providing muscles with a burst of energy. They also shut down all nonessential bodily processes, such as digestion and the immune response. “This is just the body being efficient,” Sapolsky says. “When you’re being chased by a lion, you don’t want to waste resources on the small intestine. You’ll ovulate some other time. You need every ounce of energy just to get away.”

--

Confront your fears

When paratroopers are first learning to parachute, they experience a massive stress response. In fact, one study of Norwegian airmen found that this response started before the jump and lasted for hours afterward. But something interesting happened when the soldiers kept jumping out of planes. Instead of being stressed for hours at a time, they showed elevated levels of stress hormone only while in midair, which is precisely when they needed it. The chronic stress response that causes long-term harm had all but disappeared.

--

Don’t force yourself to exercise

While exercise is remarkably effective at blunting the stress response, at least for a few hours, this effect exists only if you want to exercise in the first place. After all, a big reason working out relieves stress is that it elevates your mood; when mice are forced to run in the lab, their levels of stress hormones spike. So when you force yourself to go to the gym and then suffer through 30 minutes on the treadmill (lamenting the experience the entire time), you don’t reduce your stress levels. In fact, you might be making things worse.
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