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Old 09-21-2010, 10:25 AM   #11
Blair Lowe
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The question remains as to whether they should be taught from both sides at once.
One of the particular shihan in my system is noted for saying it's better to be able to do it good on one side than shit on both side. The meaning is get it good on one side versus training both sides at first and having no competency early on. Once you figure out how to get it good on one side, it's a helluva lot easier doing it on the off-side.
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Old 09-21-2010, 10:36 AM   #12
Grissim Connery
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Originally Posted by Gant Grimes View Post

A good way to teach combos (IMO) is to teach them to actually try a throw--get blocked--and move to the next. E.g. Tori attempts right o soto gari; uke steps back with his right; tori hits o uchi gari (or uchi mata, tai otoshi, etc.).
i feel that when you're on the ground, you have to do it this way. because everything is less dynamic on the floor, you have to legitimately do a move and have it blocked before anything else opens up.

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Originally Posted by Gant Grimes View Post

Throwing from both sides: The opinions are mixed. We all agree that students should be taught to throw from both sides. The question remains as to whether they should be taught from both sides at once.

I'd say a large majority teach one-sided judo (I am part of that). The motor patterns are hard enough to learn and can be easily confused. Despite learning one-sided judo myself, I threw two opponents for ippon last year with left-side throws despite never having practiced them. Once a throw it hard-wired, your body seems to be able to translate it. At least mine was. BTW, I work off both sides now and it works fine.

The other school of thought is that since everybody should learn how to throw off both sides that you may as well start this way. I don't know anybody personally who teaches this way, but I know there are some respected high dans around the world who do. I think it would be really difficult to start with this, as everybody has a natural pivot that makes learning one side easier.
i've often found in BJJ that if you do a move a whole lot, then you can just all the sudden do it on both sides. as a result, i generally just practice moves on one side. it especially helps if they block your move, and the counter to their block is to do the same move but on the other side (this happens a lot with omo platas and triangles).

back when i played lacrosse, the best way to learn to use your offhand was to just believe that it was no different and that you could already do it. it was weird how quickly you could start switching sides just by being confident. you always sucked when you tried to think about it too much.

i've felt that same way the few times i've been uncomfortable on my off side while grappling. if you just believe you can do it on that side, your body seems to take over nicely.
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Old 09-21-2010, 11:46 AM   #13
Brian Stone
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Re: learning to throw from both sides at once, my instructor stresses that primarily because he has an actual muscle and posture imbalance due to prolonged heavy favoritism of one side his entire life. However, maintaining this might arguably as easily fit the category of learning both sides but not at the same time.

Also, I question whether this would be an issue with a steady and intelligently designed strength training program outside of judo.
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