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Old 11-13-2010, 05:02 PM   #11
Derek Weaver
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Cool Yael. I'll keep some sort of a running journal on what information I collect in office, whatever stretching and SMR stuff I do etc. and how progress is.
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Old 11-14-2010, 07:17 AM   #12
Jarod Barker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek Weaver View Post
PS.
If anyone is interested, or experiencing any issues similar to mine (still fully functioning, low level symptoms etc.) I am willing to post whatever progress and information I get.

Of course, you'd have to accept that it's not medical advice, I'm not a trained medical professional etc. Informational only.

If not, I'll keep it to myself.

(I hate the whole CYA requirement)
I'd be interested, I've had alot of improvement, but it still gets a little funny now and then.

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Originally Posted by Yael Grauer View Post
I'd be interested. I've had anterior tilt forever but some work from a PRI guy helped a lot, plus what I call psoas torture and some mobility exercises. Then, I did a Gokhale seminar which helped a bit more but I am still a bit anterior (though it has lessened quite a bit.) I heard rolfing can help.
Have you ever had rolfing done on anything? I had it done on my calf once, very painful, but effective. I was supposed to go back for multiple treatments, but opted for electrostim and ultrasound instead.
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Old 11-14-2010, 10:16 AM   #13
Yael Grauer
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I have never had rolfing done, though I've tried just about everything else. It can be pretty aggressive and I've seen people who have had dramatic structural changes from it but tend to revert to their old patterns afterwards, so I'm hesitant, but my PRI guy in Tucson thought it'd be a good fit for me.
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Old 11-14-2010, 05:55 PM   #14
Craig Brown
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Derek, more info is never bad. I think I've had at least some of everything mentioned on this thread!

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Old 11-15-2010, 07:51 AM   #15
Jarod Barker
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Originally Posted by Yael Grauer View Post
I have never had rolfing done, though I've tried just about everything else. It can be pretty aggressive and I've seen people who have had dramatic structural changes from it but tend to revert to their old patterns afterwards, so I'm hesitant, but my PRI guy in Tucson thought it'd be a good fit for me.
I'd say it's definitely worth trying. I couldn't believe how different my calf felt afterwards, but I just don't think it was beneficial enough for that particular injury. Perhaps if I had a purely muscular injury, I might try rolfing again.
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Old 12-10-2010, 03:44 PM   #16
Derek Weaver
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Update:
Been getting a lacrosse ball and doing work on the piriformis, hip flexors, TFL etc. Whatever I can dig into around the hip, both flexors, extensors etc. I get into. Once I find a spot that sucks, I hang out there and wait it out. At times this has taken more than a couple minutes.

Afterwards, I have been going through 2-5 minutes of stretching per area. If one area is tighter, even after the lacrosse ball or foam rolling, I hang out for as long as I can a) handle it, or b) til the muscle releases or I reach the end range.

After that, I'll do some iso work to get the glute on the right side firing a bit better.

I also began to address that my right foot was a bit externally rotated. I had these things going on forever, but thought it was how I was built. As I've worked on these two issues, my hips and lower back have been much better and I've had less popping.

Additional updates as they become relevant...
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Old 12-10-2010, 06:32 PM   #17
Steven Low
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Nope.... most people aren't "built" a certain way at all. They think it's normal when things ain't normal.

Even if you have structural problems they can sometimes be corrected although it's much easier to correct while you're still growing in the teens.

Glad to see you're on track and doing fairly well it seems.
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Old 12-11-2010, 01:37 AM   #18
Derek Weaver
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Thanks. I finally started looking more into the unfortunate truth that if something sticks a direction it normally wouldn't, it's usually not a genetic thing. Maybe a genetic predisposition to certain issue.

I still have some glaring imbalances, but since I've been working on loosening up my quads/hip flexors and targeting certain areas I've gotten a lot better.

One question though regarding the right foot being a bit externally rotated:

I've read a few schools of thought, and each has merit in my mind so I'd like to get a little clarification on my thinking.

One is that the internal rotators of the hip could be imbalanced and tight, causing the femur to internally rotate and the foot to overcompensate. This may be in response to a weak piriformis and glutes in general. I do seem to have a little extra tightness in the TFL area though from what I can tell. usually resolved with the lacrosse ball though. Likewise, externally rotated femurs may result in a pigeon toed stance.

The next one would be weak internal rotators and overactive glutes/piriformis causing external rotation of the hip that translates down to the ankle and foot. This doesn't seem to be the case given the imbalances between sides re: glutes

The first school of thought makes more sense to me given my set of circumstances. Any insight would be appreciated.
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Old 12-11-2010, 07:47 AM   #19
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The logical school of thought being that most people have a bit more excessive external rotation in the right ankle (rather pronation/eversion/etc.) is that they drive with their right foot and often don't move the whole leg to hit the brake and gas pedal and instead just move their ankle.

Since we're on the gas most of the time, the right foot gets in the habit of being pronated/everted.

It's true if you have really tight adductors or predisposition to valgus knees (caving knees weakness) the foot does tend to evert/pronate though.

You more see chronic external rotation in the hip in old people as the hip flexors get really tight (as psoas major, iliacus, etc.) are external rotators of the hip.

Depending on how you sit (legs crossed or not) also becomes an issue sometimes.

So usually it's multiple issues with people.


If it's only the right foot I would tend to think it's just the gas pedal thing and things we do unilaterally since most of the time if it's due to a weakness or tightness issue you're gonna get it bilaterally or on the weak leg (left leg for most people).

I have a bit of the same thing, and now hae to consciously rotate my leg or move the whole leg when I'm driving a bunch. So I know the feeling of how annoying this is to correct.

If that's not the case we'll try to figure it out from there, but gas pedal thing makes the most sense to me.
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Old 12-12-2010, 04:23 PM   #20
Derek Weaver
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Thanks for the replies and advice in this thread Steven.

Regarding gas pedal vs. tight adductors, some thoughts:
- I am pretty ambidextrous, but did favor jumping off my left leg, kicking with my right leg (thus, I am more stable balancing on my left leg) etc.

I was talking with my cousin last night who is also in PT school, and she first presented the gas pedal idea as well. Then we started talking about past sports and she noted that it's likely I have more stability and strength in the glutes, and hip extensors in general on the left side. Hamstrings are a touch stronger, glutes are definitely more active. On the right side, it seems I have overactive hip flexors and dormant hip extensors.

I think I noted it in this thread, or maybe elsewhere, but the big assessment that made me realize just how significant the differences left vs. right are is the seated 90/90 stretch. I am significantly tighter on the left side than the right. When doing glute bridges, I have to focus a ton to actually get the right side to fire. If I don't drive my heel, my high hamstring takes over completely. After several reps, this isn't as much of an issue. I do this before every deadlift session.

Final issue I noticed, and don't laugh, is that my left glute "complex" is more hypertrophied. It's not like I sit there and rub my own ass silly day in and day out, but I finally noticed this while doing some SMR stuff with the lacrosse ball. My ass is lopsided if you will.

I think I know the answer, but it seems that additional SMR on the left side + additional stretching to loosen things up, while also doing more isolation type strength and activation work (like the super dog, Cook hip lift), and mashing + stretching of the flexors and adductors may result in the foot eventually turning to a more neutral angle as well as continue to balance out the hips and potentially alleviate the SI issues?
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